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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2021

Mehriban Yusifova, Gunash Nasrullayeva, Elza Omarova, Mehriban Magerramova and Aphila Kurbanova

The provision of safe food is a topic of increasing relevance worldwide. Several countries, including Azerbaijan, attempted to develop scientific, applied, social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The provision of safe food is a topic of increasing relevance worldwide. Several countries, including Azerbaijan, attempted to develop scientific, applied, social and economic solutions to the food supply and nutrition problems. However, Azerbaijan still faces important challenges, particularly providing appropriate, eco-friendly and microbiologically safe supplies and food. These issues occur in international export and import of raw food materials and food, provision of regional and municipal control in food supply and sales and teaching food culture to the public. This viewpoint paper aims to examine the challenges that impede the provision of safe food for Azerbaijan. Such information can facilitate policy implications for governments in developing solutions to the food supply.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature review is done to base the discussions of this viewpoint paper.

Findings

Academic institutions and departments should take a more centralized and effective effort in scientific research concerning safety, hygiene and culture of nutrition. In conclusion, to ensure proper sustainment, it is necessary to provide strict microbiological, sanitary and hygienic control across the network of production and distribution of food and its import and export within regional and local food source provision systems and mechanisms.

Originality/value

To the authors’ best knowledge, there is no systematic study evaluating the challenges of ecologically and microbiological safety for food in Azerbaijan.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Andrea Grout

Food-borne illnesses are common worries for tourists. In-flight food safety issues reflect the interrelated factors arising from an expanding airline industry, with its…

Abstract

Food-borne illnesses are common worries for tourists. In-flight food safety issues reflect the interrelated factors arising from an expanding airline industry, with its increased passenger loads, extended flight times, and multiple service activities. Adapting to these new challenges, and especially the global spread of food-borne diseases, requires an understanding of the cabin crew role as food handlers and the risks associated with this task. This chapter outlines the key factors that determine the safe delivery of in-flight food services, highlights the benefits of best practice to airline operators, passengers, and tourism boards, and addresses the policy implications for airline regulators and national health authorities.

Details

Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2016

David R. Just and Jeffrey M. Swigert

Little work has directly addressed the potential to control food waste. This chapter focuses on behavioral nudges and their potential to reduce food waste and, in turn…

Abstract

Purpose

Little work has directly addressed the potential to control food waste. This chapter focuses on behavioral nudges and their potential to reduce food waste and, in turn, implications for food security.

Methodology/approach

Key methodological and definitional challenges that must be met to make effective use of interventions to reduce food waste are examined. Chief among these challenges are determining welfare measures that are robust to the behavioral anomalies and apparently inconsistent preferences observed under behavioral interventions.

Findings

Targeted reductions in food waste can be significantly impacted by simple behavioral interventions either in institutional settings or within the home. Some evidence suggests that food waste is rampant not only in developed countries, but also among developing countries.

Practical implications

Our findings highlight the need to create a research program addressing the behavioral causes of food waste both in developed and developing country contexts.

Details

Food Security in a Food Abundant World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-215-3

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Saitin Sim and Viroj Wiwanitkit

COVID-19) is the present global problem. The potential for food borne transmission of COVID-19 becomes a present discussed public health issue. At present, there are many…

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Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19) is the present global problem. The potential for food borne transmission of COVID-19 becomes a present discussed public health issue. At present, there are many reports on the food contamination with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It is no doubt that the viral contamination in food is possible. The authors summarize and discuss on food contamination, food safety and COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors give a commentary on the available data on food contamination during COVID-19 outbreak. Based on basic food safety principles, the authors build an argument on available recommendation regarding food safety during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Findings

It still lacks in many details of food safety during COVID-19 pandemic. Public health personnel usually refer to classical food safety principles for recommending general people about food safety, but it still lacks for updated specific data on COVID-19. The present commentary gives some few ideas and it is necessary to have further specific research on this specific issue.

Originality/value

This is an original commentary regarding the new contemporary problem on food contamination, food safety and COVID-19 outbreak.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Stefano Grando, Gianluca Brunori, Teresa Pinto-Correia and Lee-Ann Sutherland

This chapter provides a first systemic analysis of the environment in which small farms operate, hinging on the concept of ‘food system’. Food systems are not detached…

Abstract

This chapter provides a first systemic analysis of the environment in which small farms operate, hinging on the concept of ‘food system’. Food systems are not detached from the territory: an effective conceptualization must take into account the geographical dimension in which actors operate, originating material and immaterial flows. Thus food systems can be represented according to their functional elements, but also conceptualized and represented in their spatial dimension. This chapter provides a conceptualization of territorialized food systems, seen as a set of relations between actors located in a regional geographic space and coordinated by territorial governance (Rastoin, 2015). In the analysis of a food system in the context of a specific territory, geographical elements like distances, spatial distribution and physical and administrative borders become key factors that influence the systems’ capability to provide sustainable food and nutrition security and to achieve the other socially expected outcomes. Having explored the conceptualization of food systems as systems of actors ad flows in a given space, the chapter ends with a representation of small farms' interaction with the system (taken from a report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition of the Committee on World Food Security – HLPE), where the specific types of flows they activate are highlighted (HLPE, 2013).

Details

Innovation for Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-157-8

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Sarah Meikle

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of food tourism to connect local communities and strengthen the visitor economy through COVID-19 induced…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of food tourism to connect local communities and strengthen the visitor economy through COVID-19 induced international visitor downfalls and reimagine New Zealand tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

As a viewpoint paper, this paper is a personal and professional reflection of the relevance of food for New Zealand tourism.

Findings

The three themes of community, connection and challenges identify the potential of using local communities as ambassadors to connect both local and international visitors alike with New Zealand culture.

Practical implications

Findings of this paper can provide guidance for global communities on how to both mitigate a reduction in visitor arrivals while creating a foundation for future positioning as food destinations.

Originality/value

There is a lack of insight into the potential of special interest tourism in reimagining a post-COVID-19 tourism landscape, and this viewpoint paper contributes through its practical and community-based approach.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Iona Yuelu Huang, Louise Manning, Vicky Wood, Katy L. James, Anthony Millington, Vasilis Grigoriadis and Shane Ward

This research aims to explore retail managers' views on how food waste (FW) management activities contribute to sustainable value creation and how the customer value…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore retail managers' views on how food waste (FW) management activities contribute to sustainable value creation and how the customer value proposition (CVP) for a given food retailer interacts with their approaches to FW management.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage exploratory qualitative approach to data collection and analysis was adopted, involving in-depth interviews with retail managers, documentary analysis of multiple years of relevant corporate reports and email validation by seven major UK grocery retailers. Thematic content analysis supplemented by word similarity cluster analysis, two-step cluster analysis and crisp-set qualitative comparative analysis was undertaken.

Findings

FW management practices have been seen by retail managers to contribute to all forms of sustainable value creation, as waste reduction minimises environmental impact, saves costs and/or serves social needs, whilst economic value creation lies at the heart of retail FW management. However, retail operations are also framed by CVP and size of a retailer that enable or inhibit the adoption of certain FW management practices. Low-price retailers were more likely to adopt practices enabling them to save costs. Complicated cost-incurring solutions to FW were more likely to be adopted by retailers associated with larger size, high quality and a range of services.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to empirically explore retail managers' perception of sustainable value creation through FW management activities and to provide empirical evidence of the linkages between retail CVP and sustainable value creation in the context of retail FW management.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Jin-young Kim and Johye Hwang

This study aims to examine food tourists’ engagement in positive and negative electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) by considering the following questions: Do satisfied…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine food tourists’ engagement in positive and negative electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) by considering the following questions: Do satisfied customers engage in advocacy, and do dissatisfied customers make the same effort to spread their negative experiences? Which restaurant experience attributes influence eWOM behavior? What demographic and psychographic characteristics contribute to advocacy?

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from an online survey of 456 consumers with restaurant experience in the tourism context, this study applied simultaneous Tobit estimation to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

Engagement in negative eWOM because of poor experiences was stronger than engagement in positive eWOM because of positive experiences. Food taste was a critical attribute for both positive and negative eWOM. Authenticity was influential for positive eWOM only, and value was influential for negative eWOM only. Atmosphere, service and location were found to be insignificant, indicating that they are ‘indifferent’ factors for eWOM in the food tourism context. Female customers were more active in negative advocacy, while Generation Y customers were more active in positive advocacy. Food involvement was significantly related to both positive and negative eWOM.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study provide useful marketing and service insights for restaurant managers in the digitally connected world, enabling them to formulate services based on factors critical for restaurant eWOM in the tourism context.

Originality/value

To fill a gap in the current literature in the era of digital marketing, this study takes a comprehensive yet industry-specific perspective on eWOM engagement by examining demographic factors and the food involvement of consumers as well as restaurant experience attributes. By investigating both positive and negative eWOM, this study presents meaningful practical and theoretical implications.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2021

Syed Abdul Rehman Khan and Pablo Ponce

At the end of 2019, the first case of the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan city of China. The disease was declared a pandemic without imagining the…

Abstract

Purpose

At the end of 2019, the first case of the Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan city of China. The disease was declared a pandemic without imagining the magnitude of damage currently caused in all branches of the economy. One of the most affected sectors was food and mostly perishable food (PF), which are more susceptible to environmental conditions. Thus, the research examines the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on Ecuador's perishable food supply chains (PFSCs) during the pandemic. It contributes to new results on the special issue (SI) PFSC response to event risk and uncertainty, such as those that generated the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used are from primary information sources, which were collected through a questionnaire. The questionnaire was applied to 298 companies belonging to the sector, and later the information was processed through partial least squares structural equation model. The convergent validity, discriminate and robustness tests provide arguments for the suitability of the model. Therefore, the findings are reliable and valid for the adequate measures to improve the PFSC due to a COVID-19 outbreak.

Findings

The results show that the perception of personal risk (PPR) produced by COVID-19 has caused the companies of the PFSC to adopt preventive policies (PO) to avoid contagion and guarantee the operation of the companies. In addition, the PPR has been responsible for the alterations in the demand and price (DP) of PF. Next, PO and DP have a significant effect on PFSC, which shows the evidence favouring the malfunction of PFSC operations due to anti-contagion PO, the mismatch of DP. On the contrary, circular economy practices contribute to the excellent performance of the PFSC. Finally, the research suggests some policy implications to consider in improving the PFSC.

Originality/value

This study is the first to be carried out in Ecuador's country on the PFSC; its contribution is unprecedented and makes it a road-map to be considered to guarantee the correct functioning of the PFSCs, and it will provide policymakers with valid elements to design efficient PFSCs that better respond to unforeseen events and uncertainties. Future research will focus on analysing the management of PF consumption in Ecuador during the pandemic.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Subhalakshmi Bezbaruah, Amandeep Dhir, Shalini Talwar, Teck Ming Tan and Puneet Kaur

Fake news represents a real risk for brands, particularly for firms selling essential products, such as food items. Despite this anecdotal acknowledgement, the dynamics of…

Abstract

Purpose

Fake news represents a real risk for brands, particularly for firms selling essential products, such as food items. Despite this anecdotal acknowledgement, the dynamics of the relationship between fake news and brand reputation remain under-explored. The present study addresses this gap by examining the association of consumer values (universalism and openness to change), brand trust, fake news risk and system trust in the context of natural food products.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a cross-sectional survey design and the mall-intercept method to collect data from 498 consumers of natural food residing in India. To test the hypotheses, which were grounded in the stimulus-organism-response (SOR) framework, the collected data were analysed using covariance-based structural equation modelling in SPSS AMOS. The conceptual model proposed universalism and openness to change as stimuli, brand trust as an internal state or organism and fake news risk – captured through the tendency of consumers to believe and act on fake news – as a response.

Findings

The findings support a positive association of universalism with brand trust and a negative association with fake news risk. In comparison, openness to change has no association with either brand trust or fake news risk. Brand trust, meanwhile, is negatively related to fake news, and this association is moderated by system trust. Furthermore, brand trust partially mediates the relationship between universalism value and fake news risk.

Originality/value

Notably, the present study is one of the first attempts to understand the fake news risk associated with natural food brands by utilising the SOR framework in an emerging market setting. The study provides interesting insights for policymakers, brands and consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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