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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Srinath Perera, Onaopepo Adeniyi and Solomon Olusola Babatunde

A better cooperation among all stakeholders working towards enhancing the disaster resilience of societies can only be achieved if the expectations or the needs of each…

Abstract

Purpose

A better cooperation among all stakeholders working towards enhancing the disaster resilience of societies can only be achieved if the expectations or the needs of each stakeholder are understood. This study attempts to outline the needs of communities affected by disasters for the purpose of aligning the needs and skill requirements with the abilities of built environment professionals serving these communities. Therefore, the study aims to identify and describe community needs and skills requirements for enhancing disaster resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted literature review and semi-structured interviews. The semi-structured interviews were conducted with key members of some communities affected by disasters and with some of the professionals who participated in the restoration/reconstruction of those communities. Data obtained were analysed using NVivo 10.

Findings

The study revealed the current and emerging needs and skills of communities related to the built environment professionals from the viewpoint of enhancing disaster resilience. Thus, 29 classifications of skill and needs were derived and classified under five major disaster resilience dimensions to include social, economic, technological, environmental and institutional aspects.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses only of the needs and skills of the “community”, which is the major stakeholder that is basically the receiver of all that the other stakeholders of disaster resilience have to offer.

Practical implications

This study would help the built environment professionals involved in disaster resilience to become aware of the specific needs and skills of the communities affected by disasters for the purpose of developing their competences.

Originality/value

The study findings would be useful for both the built environment professionals and higher education institutions. Because it is important for professionals to update and upgrade their knowledge towards enhancing their capabilities and meeting stakeholders’ expectations in a bid to enhance societal resilience to disasters across all domains of resilience.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

K.G.B. Bakewell

Some libraries and information services are quite definitely user‐centred; some think they are but are not always; some seem to be designed for librarians rather than…

Abstract

Some libraries and information services are quite definitely user‐centred; some think they are but are not always; some seem to be designed for librarians rather than users. The purpose of this monograph is to encourage the development of libraries to meet the perceived needs of users — I hope it will be found useful by librarians and information workers as well as by students.

Details

Library Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Lia Metzger, Cyrus Ahalt, Margot Kushel, Alissa Riker and Brie Williams

The rapidly increasing number of older adults cycling through local criminal justice systems (jails, probation, and parole) suggests a need for greater collaboration among…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapidly increasing number of older adults cycling through local criminal justice systems (jails, probation, and parole) suggests a need for greater collaboration among a diverse group of local stakeholders including professionals from healthcare delivery, public health, and criminal justice and directly affected individuals, their families, and advocates. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that local communities can use to understand and begin to address the needs of criminal justice-involved older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework included solicit input from community stakeholders to identify pressing challenges facing criminal justice-involved older adults, conduct needs assessments of criminal justice-involved older adults and professionals working with them; implement quick-response interventions based on needs assessments; share findings with community stakeholders and generate public feedback; engage interdisciplinary group to develop an action plan to optimize services.

Findings

A five-step framework for creating an interdisciplinary community response is an effective approach to action planning and broad stakeholder engagement on behalf of older adults cycling through the criminal justice system.

Originality/value

This study proposes the Criminal Justice Involved Older Adults in Need of Treatment Initiative Framework for establishing an interdisciplinary community response to the growing population of medically and socially vulnerable criminal justice-involved older adults.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Dinesh Rathi, Lisa M. Given and Eric Forcier

This paper aims to present findings from a study of non-profit organizations (NPOs), including a model of knowledge needs that can be applied by practitioners and scholars…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present findings from a study of non-profit organizations (NPOs), including a model of knowledge needs that can be applied by practitioners and scholars to further develop the NPO sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with NPOs operating in Canada and Australia. An analysis of survey responses identified the different types of knowledge essential for each organization. Respondents identified the importance of three pre-determined themes (quantitative data) related to knowledge needs, as well as a fourth option, which was a free text box (qualitative data). The quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analyses and a grounded theory approach, respectively.

Findings

Analysis of the quantitative data indicates that NPOs ' needs are comparable in both countries. Analysis of qualitative data identified five major categories and multiple sub-categories representing the types of knowledge needs of NPOs. Major categories are knowledge about management and organizational practices, knowledge about resources, community knowledge, sectoral knowledge and situated knowledge. The paper discusses the results using semantic proximity and presents an emergent, evidence-based knowledge management (KM)-NPO model.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the growing body of literature in the KM domain, and in the understudied research domain related to the knowledge needs and experiences of NPOs. NPOs will find the identified categories and sub-categories useful to undertake KM initiatives within their individual organizations. The study is also unique, as it includes data from two countries, Canada and Australia.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Rosemary Stockdale

This paper aims to examine peer‐to‐peer online communities for people with chronic diseases in order to present a conceptual framework that identifies the needs of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine peer‐to‐peer online communities for people with chronic diseases in order to present a conceptual framework that identifies the needs of members. This framework aims to improve understanding of the role of these communities in the enhancement of people's self‐management of chronic disease care.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is drawn from the literature and tested against three illustrative case studies using an ethnographic approach. Taking an objective perspective, the data were examined against the proposed framework. The iterative cycle of qualitative analysis supported reflection through the ongoing observation of the case communities over several months.

Findings

The research underpins identification of members' needs as presented in the framework. It finds that the constructs of the shared space provide a context for the identified needs of members which are revised to reflect the findings. Social needs are broadened to include the powerful influences of communication through self‐expression, spiritual support and advocacy. Hedonic needs are found to play a significant role in continued participation.

Practical implications

Improved management of chronic disease care benefits both the patient and a range of stakeholders concerned with delivery of care services. Greater recognition of the identified needs of online community members supports the capability to improve the effectiveness of healthcare delivery.

Originality/value

This research provides a framework for enhancing the ability of online communities to empower patients. It identifies specific needs of members and presents a conceptual framework to facilitate continuing research in this significant area.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Rick Colbourne

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support…

Abstract

Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid venture creation represents a significant opportunity for Indigenous peoples to build vibrant Indigenous-led economies that support sustainable economic development and well-being. It is a means by which they can assert their rights to design, develop and maintain Indigenous-centric political, economic and social systems and institutions. In order to develop an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the intersection between Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures, this chapter adopts a case study approach to examining Indigenous entrepreneurship and the underlying global trends that have influenced the design, structure and mission of Indigenous hybrid ventures. The cases present how Indigenous entrepreneurial ventures are, first and foremost, hybrid ventures that are responsive to community needs, values, cultures and traditions. They demonstrate that Indigenous entrepreneurship and hybrid ventures are more successful when the rights of Indigenous peoples are addressed and when these initiatives are led by or engage Indigenous communities. The chapter concludes with a conceptual model that can be applied to generate insights into the complex interrelationships and interdependencies that influence the formation of Indigenous hybrid ventures and value creation strategies according to three dimensions: (i) the overarching dimension of indigeneity and Indigenous rights; (ii) indigenous community orientations and (iii) indigenous hybrid venture creation considerations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Shiraz Durrani

Addresses a number of issues concerning racial discrimination in UK public libraries. It examines Black librarianship in the UK in 2001; records the development of the…

Abstract

Addresses a number of issues concerning racial discrimination in UK public libraries. It examines Black librarianship in the UK in 2001; records the development of the Quality Leaders Project which focuses on policy development, management and leadership issues in the context of Black workers and community needs; and discusses the potential contribution of this approach.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Deborah Quilgars

Care and support agendas have tended to focus on the need to develop effective services to meet individualised needs within communities of interest. In contrast, community

Abstract

Care and support agendas have tended to focus on the need to develop effective services to meet individualised needs within communities of interest. In contrast, community development and regeneration policy have concentrated on the needs of the broader ‘community’ but with little regard to support and care. Rarely do these two important policy domains meet in practice. A three‐year pilot initiative, the Hull Community Care Development Project, aimed to develop the capacity of local communities to respond to their own support and ‘community care’ needs. An independent evaluation documented how such an approach could begin to bridge community and care, and how this produced new challenges, communities prioritising broad neighbourhood issues over specific care and support concerns.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Joseph John Morgan, Brian Knudsen, Mona Nasir-Tucktuck and Tracy Griffin Spies

Students living in urban environments tend to have lower academic achievement and college- and career-readiness skills than students living in suburban environments, as…

Abstract

Students living in urban environments tend to have lower academic achievement and college- and career-readiness skills than students living in suburban environments, as well as tend to be more at-risk for social-emotional learning problems. Research indicates that several school and community variables are related to this education discrepancy, and aligning these variables to best meet the needs of students is the best way to improve educational outcomes. This chapter will describe a collective impact initiative designed to align school, community, and nonprofit resources in an urban environment to best address the needs of students and increase academic success.

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Amy Elizabeth Fulton, Julie Drolet, Nasreen Lalani and Erin Smith

This article explores the community recovery and resilience element of “building back better” (BBB) through the perspectives and experiences of community influencers who…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the community recovery and resilience element of “building back better” (BBB) through the perspectives and experiences of community influencers who provided psychosocial supports after the 2013 floods in southern Alberta, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The Alberta Resilient Communities (ARC) project adopted a community-based research methodology to examine the lived realities of children, youth, families and their communities postflood. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 37 community influencer participants representing a range of organizations including not-for-profit agencies, community organizations, social service agencies and government departments.

Findings

The findings were drawn from the interviews held with community influencers in flood-affected communities. Major themes include disaster response challenges, insufficient funding for long-term disaster recovery, community partnerships and collaborations and building and strengthening social capital.

Practical implications

Findings demonstrate the need to build better psychosocial services, supports and resources in the long term to support community recovery and resilience postdisaster for children, youth and families to “build back better” on a psychosocial level.

Social implications

Local social service agencies play a key role in the capacity of children, youth and families to “build back better” postdisaster. These organizations need to be resourced and prepared to respond to psychosocial needs in the long term in order to successfully contribute to postdisaster recovery.

Originality/value

The findings illustrate that adopting a psychosocial framework for disaster recovery can better inform social service disaster response and long-term recovery plans consistent with the BBB framework. Implications for social service agencies and policymakers interested in fostering postdisaster community recovery and resilience, particularly with children and youth, are presented.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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