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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinström

This chapter explores new and emerging dimensions in our understanding of how information behaviour develops in early childhood. Spink (2010) proposed that information

Abstract

This chapter explores new and emerging dimensions in our understanding of how information behaviour develops in early childhood. Spink (2010) proposed that information behaviour — when we engage in behaviours to make sense of, seek, avoid, forage, use and organise information — is (1) shaped by both instinctive and environmental dimensions that are as essential to the lives of our prehistoric ancestors as they are for people today and (2) emerges in early childhood. This chapter explores what we currently know about the development of cognitive, language, social and information behaviour abilities in early childhood. Drawing on research from cognitive and developmental psychology, and findings from two studies of different aspects of young children's information behaviours, including Web searching (Spink, et al., 2010) and library information categorisation (Cooper, 2004), the chapter discusses information behaviour development in early childhood. The connection between general cognitive development and information behaviour are discussed, and further research suggested.

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinström

A sign of maturity of a scientific field is its theoretical growth that is based on an increased depth of understanding and a broadening of the contexts and issues…

Abstract

A sign of maturity of a scientific field is its theoretical growth that is based on an increased depth of understanding and a broadening of the contexts and issues addressed. Information behaviour research has grown substantially over the last 10 years, expanding from a focused exploration of utilitarian features such as problem-focused, work-related information behaviour to inclusion of aspects such as leisurely information needs and impact of spiritual information. Exploring new concepts and contexts helps to build an increasingly thorough and holistic understanding of information behaviour, which, in turn, lifts the field to a higher theoretical level.

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Amanda Spink and Jannica Heinström

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response…

Abstract

Ever since our cognitive make-up allowed it, human beings have used their information behaviour abilities to help them survive. Information behaviour evolved in response to the need by early humans to benefit from information that could not be immediately accessible in the nearby environment or obtained through communication. Humans developed an information behaviour ability, including processes of information sense making, foraging, seeking, organising and using. Information behaviour brought several benefits to early humans, including greater influence and control over their environment, and the degree in which they could use the environment for their own gain and survival. Information behaviour thus brought several advantages for the survival of early humans, and consequently emerged as a genetically favoured trait (Spink, 2010).

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Amanda Spink and Minsoo Park

During multitasking, humans handle multiple tasks through task switching or engage in multitasking information behaviors. For example, a user switches between seeking new…

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Abstract

Purpose

During multitasking, humans handle multiple tasks through task switching or engage in multitasking information behaviors. For example, a user switches between seeking new kitchen information and medical information. Recent studies provide insights these complex multitasking human information behaviors (HIB). However, limited studies have examined the interplay between information and non‐information tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

The goal of the paper was to examine the interplay of information and non‐information task behaviors.

Findings

This paper explores and speculates on a new direction in HIB research. The nature of HIB as a multitasking activity including the interplay of information and non‐information behavior tasks, and the relation between multitasking information behavior to cognitive style and individual differences, is discussed. A model of multitasking between information and non‐information behavior tasks is proposed.

Practical implications/limitations

Multitasking information behavior models should include the interplay of information and non‐information tasks, and individual differences and cognitive styles.

Originality/value

The paper is the first information science theoretical examination of the interplay between information and non‐information tasks.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Sik Sumaedi, Sumardjo, Amiruddin Saleh and Agus Fanar Syukri

During Covid-19 pandemic, Millennials, which are familiar with the Internet, may contribute in facing the pandemic by consistently sharing healthy food information. Thus…

Abstract

Purpose

During Covid-19 pandemic, Millennials, which are familiar with the Internet, may contribute in facing the pandemic by consistently sharing healthy food information. Thus, it is important to improve Millennials online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic. This research aims to examine the simultaneous effects of e-health literacy, knowledge of the digital health communication media (DHCM) use, facilitating conditions, information quality and source credibility on Millennials' online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was performed to collect the data. The respondents of the survey are 205 DHCM millennial users who lived in Tangerang Regency and Tangerang City, Indonesia. This research performed a multiple regression analysis to test the conceptual model and proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Millennials' online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic was significantly affected by perceived threat of Covid-19, knowledge of the DHCM use and the facilitating conditions. However, it was not significantly affected by e-health literacy, information quality and source credibility.

Research limitations/implications

This research employed a purposive sampling technique. This research also was conducted only in Tangerang Regency and Tangerang City, Indonesia. In order to test the stability of the research findings, future research should be conducted in other contexts.

Practical implications

In order to improve Millennials' online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic, it was essential to educate Millennials on the importance of healthy food consumption during the Covid-19 pandemic and their relationships. It is also important to enrich Millennials' knowledge of reliable and trustworthy online health information sources, such as the DHCM, and the search method. Furthermore, the facilitating conditions of online healthy food information-sharing behaviour should be improved.

Originality/value

It is well known that online healthy food information-sharing behaviour is important during Covid-19 pandemic. However, there is lack of study that specifically focused on Millennials' online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic. This paper is the first that develops and tests a model of Millennials' online healthy food information-sharing behaviour during the Covid-19 pandemic. The model can be used to understand the behaviour and develop intervention strategy.

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British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Jarim Kim and Yesolran Kim

This study aimed to examine the relationships between different uses of Internet modes and political participation, focusing on political information behaviors, including…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the relationships between different uses of Internet modes and political participation, focusing on political information behaviors, including political information seeking and forwarding.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used secondary data from the 2016 Korea Media Panel Survey conducted with 8,439 Korean adults.

Findings

The results indicated that political participation is generally associated with the use of online news forums, online communities, online services and online information production, but not with the use of social networking sites (SNSs). Additional analyses revealed that the use of different Internet modes has an indirect effect on voting intention through political information seeking. The analysis also showed that a number of sociodemographic characteristics influence political participation.

Originality/value

As one of the first studies to focus on active information behaviors in examining the influence of Internet use, this study enhances the understanding of how human behaviors are shaped by digital technology. By providing guidelines for the use of different modes of the Internet, the findings of this study also have practical implications for efforts to encourage political participation.

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Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

David Elsweiler, Max L. Wilson and Brian Kirkegaard Lunn

Originally grounded in library and information science, the majority of information behaviour and information-seeking theories focus on task-based scenarios where users…

Abstract

Originally grounded in library and information science, the majority of information behaviour and information-seeking theories focus on task-based scenarios where users try to resolve information needs. While other theories exist, such as how people unexpectedly encounter information, for example, they are typically related back to tasks, motivated by work or personal goals. This chapter, however, focuses on casual-leisure scenarios that are typically motivated by hedonistic needs rather than information needs, where people engage in searching behaviours for pleasure rather than to find information. This chapter describes two studies on (1) television information behaviour and (2) the casual information behaviours described by users of Twitter. The first study focuses on a specific casual-leisure domain that is familiar to many, while the second indicates that our findings generalise to many other casual-leisure scenarios. The results of these two studies are then used to define an initial model of casual-leisure information behaviour, which highlights the key differences between casual-leisure scenarios and typical information behaviour theory. The chapter concludes by discussing how this new model of casual-leisure information behaviour challenges the way we design information systems, measure their value and consequently evaluate their support for users.

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Hamid Keshavarz, Amir Vafaeian and Ali Shabani

User behavior in online information evaluation is the result of a multitude of factors related to social, cultural, personal and psychological issues. The present study…

Abstract

Purpose

User behavior in online information evaluation is the result of a multitude of factors related to social, cultural, personal and psychological issues. The present study aimed to examine the effects of three important psychological variables including personality, self-efficacy and attitude on online information evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Four validated measures were administrated in person and online among 355 postgraduate students at Shahed University, Tehran, Iran. For testing the possible relationships among the variables, the reliability, normality and Pearson correlation tests were performed by using SPSS 24.0. Moreover, to test the ten hypotheses of the research, the structural equation modeling was considered using AMOS 26.0.

Findings

The findings confirmed the first five research hypotheses indicating the direct positive relationships among the four variables except for the impact of self-efficacy on attitude. The mediated effects of the variables were not supported except for the mediating role of attitude in the impact of personality on online evaluation behavior. The variable personality was found to be fundamental among the tested paths because it influenced the information evaluation behavior, both directly and indirectly.

Originality/value

The study showed the impacts of the three variables, which demonstrates that online information evaluation is greatly affected by psychological factors.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

David Ellis

This chapter explores how early theorising about information behaviour and the emergence of conceptual modelling in information behaviour research had its beginnings in…

Abstract

This chapter explores how early theorising about information behaviour and the emergence of conceptual modelling in information behaviour research had its beginnings in thinking that was taking place in the very late 1970s and early 1980s in Europe and the USA. Some of these ideas were presented in papers that are very familiar and much cited, but others in papers which may be less familiar and, consequently, may not be much cited, but which together contribute to explain why the rapid development in conceptual thinking about, as opposed to the simple empirical study of, information behaviour took place from that period to the present. Four dimensions are identified which together underpin the emergence of conceptual modelling in contemporary information behaviour research. The four dimensions are (1) the adoption of a social science perspective, (2) a qualitative as opposed to a quantitative orientation, (3) a focus on the modelling of information behaviour and (4) a concern with empirical validation and exemplification in the development of such models. These four dimensions came together to provide a tacit rather than explicit framework for subsequent theorising about information behaviour, and in particular underpinned studies involved the conceptual modelling of information behaviour. Information behaviour research then began to develop conceptual models very different from the empiricism of earlier studies, and, at the same time exhibited a strong concern for the exemplification or validation of these models in empirical studies. This combination of theoretically based conceptual modelling and empirical exemplification and validation together gave much of the character to information behaviour research from the later 1970s and early 1980s, an influence that extends to the present.

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New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

David Bawden and Lyn Robinson

This chapter reviews the study of individual differences in information behaviour; those differences which are not due to demographic factors such as age, gender…

Abstract

This chapter reviews the study of individual differences in information behaviour; those differences which are not due to demographic factors such as age, gender, education or occupation, but rather to personality factors and to learning and thinking styles. It examines studies of patterns in information behaviour and of personality and similar factors in groups of information-focused occupations, as well as studies which have explicitly sought to relate information behaviour to such factors. The aim of the chapter is to assess how far we have come in being able to identify and measure ‘information style’, a quality different from any other categorisation of personality or of intellectual styles. If this goal were achieved, it would be a valuable concept for the academic study of information-related behaviours, as well as being of practical usefulness for the design of information systems and services, the evaluation of the effectiveness of such systems and the training of users. It could also allow a tailored provision of information, particularly for creative or innovative purposes.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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