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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Mark Swift

A community-centred approach to health called Community Wellbeing Practices (CWP) is being offered to patients at all 17 GP practices in Halton in order to respond more…

Abstract

Purpose

A community-centred approach to health called Community Wellbeing Practices (CWP) is being offered to patients at all 17 GP practices in Halton in order to respond more appropriately to patients’ social needs, which are often an underlying reason for their presentation at primary care services. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Delivered in partnership with a local social enterprise this approach is centred on the integration of community assets and non-medical community-based support provided by the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector. The core elements include community navigation, social prescribing and social action approaches.

Findings

The CWP initiative has supported more than 5,000 patients over the last four years and has evidenced demonstrable improvements in a range of health and social outcomes for patients.

Research limitations/implications

The initiative has been well received by clinicians and social care professionals and has contributed to a cultural transformation in the way health and care professionals are responding to the identified needs of the community.

Practical implications

Using community-centred approaches in this way may help to augment clinical outcomes as well as reduce demand on over stretched public services.

Social implications

Community-centred models such as the one in Halton have the potential to empower citizens to play an active role in creating healthier communities by catalysing a “people powered” social movement for health.

Originality/value

The CWP model in Halton is a good example of the way community-centred approaches to health can be integrated with health and care pathways to augment clinical outcomes and reduce demand on over stretched services.

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Christofer Pihl

By using the concept of style, the purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the notion of brand community. More specifically, it seeks to explore how style can function as…

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12231

Abstract

Purpose

By using the concept of style, the purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the notion of brand community. More specifically, it seeks to explore how style can function as a linking value in forms of communities centred on brands that emerge within the empirical context of fashion and social media.

Design/methodology/approach

A netnography of the content produced by 18 fashion bloggers in Sweden was conducted. Content analysis of this material was used to map how consumption objects, in terms of fashion brands, were integrated in activities taking place on blogs, and through these processes, acted as a linking value for community members.

Findings

– This paper demonstrates how fashion bloggers, together with their readers, constitute a form of community centred on style. It also shows how fashion bloggers, by combining and assembling fashion brands and products, articulate and express different style sets, and how they, together with their followers, engage in activities connected to these style ideals.

Research limitations/implications

– As this study has been empirically limited to a Swedish setting, future research would benefit from findings of international expressions of communities of style.

Practical implications

Based on this study, strategies for managing communities of style is suggested to represent a potential source of competitive advantage for fashion firms.

Originality/value

In the context of the conceptual discussion about what brings members of communities together, this study provides evidence of how style can function as a linking value in the setting of consumer communities that emerge within the boundaries of fashion and social media.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship for Deprived Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-988-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Gerald Wistow and Gill Callaghan

This article is the second which the Journal of Integrated Care has published about the Hartlepool connected care pilot. It takes up the narrative from the launch of the…

Abstract

This article is the second which the Journal of Integrated Care has published about the Hartlepool connected care pilot. It takes up the narrative from the launch of the community audit report in February 2006 to the project's successful bid to become one of the 26 DoH social enterprise pilots some 12 months later. It seeks to understand the barriers encountered as the pilot sought to implement a service model based on an audit of local needs and ambitions. It identifies the need for support outside the local policy systems if holistic, community‐based initiatives are to be initiated and implemented. In addition, it considers some of the implementation dilemmas that the pilot posed for local agencies and that it had itself to face and resolve during this second phase in its development.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Jon Coaffee

The city of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, has become an urban laboratory where numerous nationally prescribed regeneration partnerships and strategies have been “tried‐out”…

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1657

Abstract

The city of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, has become an urban laboratory where numerous nationally prescribed regeneration partnerships and strategies have been “tried‐out” over the last 30 years. This paper unpacks the different and often contradictory spatial scales that such responses have taken, be they area‐based or city‐wide, as well as how “ways of doing” regeneration have been subsequently recast by this range of new partnerships, structures and processes. These developments have subsequently transformed the linkages between both central government and localities, and between local authorities and citizens, especially with regard to issues of trust‐based relationships. This paper will exemplify these changes by highlighting how the Government's flagship community‐centred regeneration partnership collided with an ambitious and far‐reaching local authority‐led city‐wide regeneration strategy. This paper concludes by discussing and how this has implications for managing regeneration partnerships per se in the current urban policy context.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Stefan Gold, Alexander Trautrims and Zoe Trodd

This paper aims to draw attention to the challenges modern slavery poses to supply chain management. Although many international supply chains are (most often unknowingly…

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16509

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw attention to the challenges modern slavery poses to supply chain management. Although many international supply chains are (most often unknowingly) connected to slave labour activities, supply chain managers and researchers have so far neglected the issue. This will most likely change as soon as civil society lobbying and new legislation impose increasing litigation and reputational risks on companies operating international supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a definition of slavery; explores potentials for knowledge exchange with other disciplines; discusses management tools for detecting slavery, as well as suitable company responses after its detection; and outlines avenues for future research.

Findings

Due to a lack of effective indicators, new tools and indicator systems need to be developed that consider the specific social, cultural and geographical context of supply regions. After detection of slavery, multi-stakeholder partnerships, community-centred approaches and supplier development appear to be effective responses.

Research limitations/implications

New theory development in supply chain management (SCM) is urgently needed to facilitate the understanding, avoidance and elimination of slavery in supply chains. As a starting point for future research, the challenges of slavery to SCM are conceptualised, focussing on capabilities and specific institutional context.

Practical implications

The paper provides a starting point for the development of practices and tools for identifying and removing slave labour from supply chains.

Originality/value

Although representing a substantial threat to current supply chain models, slavery has so far not been addressed in SCM research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Yannick Thomas van Hierden, Timo Dietrich and Sharyn Rundle-Thiele

This study aims to demonstrate how banks can align their CSR investment to community needs and citizen preferences. A grounded theory inductive approach is applied to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate how banks can align their CSR investment to community needs and citizen preferences. A grounded theory inductive approach is applied to deliver a community-centred process that banks can apply to inform CSR investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a sequential mixed-method research design to identify areas of need from the perspective of community leaders and members through depth interviews. Following thematic analysis, citizen preferences for eight priority areas were elicited using best-worst scaling (BWS).

Findings

Clear investment preferences emerged with citizens preferring six community investment causes, namely, (1) infrastructure, (2) crisis and prevention support, (3) community groups, (4) youth facilities and activities, (5) initiatives that support the local environment, and (6) physical activity promotion. The forming of community advisory committees emerged as one approach that banks could apply to ensure long-term citizen-centred CSR investment decisions.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to one community and one community bank and a small convenience, cross-sectional data sample.

Social implications

Community-oriented financial institutions should centre investment decisions on community need and citizen preferences ensuring investments made deliver the greatest societal benefit and community support for the banks is garnered.

Originality/value

This paper provides important contributions to improve the effectiveness of CSR initiatives, providing an inductive, methodological approach that financial institutions can follow to better align their CSR investment to community needs and preferences.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Jane L. Ireland, Carol A. Ireland and Christina L Power

The purpose of this paper is to examine attitudes towards prisoner-to-prisoner bullying, further considering the association between attitudes and characteristics of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine attitudes towards prisoner-to-prisoner bullying, further considering the association between attitudes and characteristics of the prison environment thought to promote prisoner bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered to 423 adult male prisoners and 195 correctional officers from three prisons in Canada. Participants completed the Prison Bullying Scale and the Prison Environmental Scale.

Findings

Convergence in attitudes between prisoners and officers were noted although staff were more likely to consider bullies to be skilled, whereas prisoners were more likely than officers to feel that victims of bullying should be supported. Associations between attitudes supportive of bullying and environmental characteristics likely to promote prison bullying were found primarily among prisoners; the strongest predictors of such attitudes were poor relationships (e.g. prisoner to officer; prisoner-to-prisoner).

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights the importance of the social aspect of the prison environment. It further provides an outline of two measures that could have utility in evaluating interventions designed to reduce prisoner-to-prisoner bullying.

Practical implications

Interventions into prisoner-to-prisoner bullying should attend to the wider environment and not focus solely on individual pathology approaches. A “whole prison” approach to intervention should be adopted, with recognition that officers and prisoners are part of the community. A focus on the perceived relationships between all those in this community requires consideration, with a community centred approach recommended for intervention. A concentrated effort is needed on evaluating and publishing interventions into prisoner-to-prisoner bullying.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine attitudes in a combined sample of prisoners and officers and focuses on the role of the wider prison environment. It also utilises a sample from three prisons as opposed to focusing on a single establishment.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Shane Rendalls, Allan D. Spigelman, Catherine Goodwin and Nataliya Daniel

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of consumer and community engagement in health service planning, quality improvement and programme evaluation in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of consumer and community engagement in health service planning, quality improvement and programme evaluation in Australia, and key components and importance of a strong suite of tools for achieving effective outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a non-systematic review of Australian national, state and territory websites in relation to policy commitment to consumer engagement, best practice framework for consumer engagement and recent project example.

Findings

Consumer engagement is a recognised component of the Australian health system. It is reflected in the national and state health policy and is a mandatory requirement of hospital accreditation. The application of co-design principles is gaining increasing popularity in health service planning and programme evaluation. Co-design is an important enabler of patient/community-centred service planning and evaluation; however, on its own it may lead to poorer outcomes. Co-design must occur within a broader systemic framework.

Practical implications

The research identifies a conceptual framework, approaches and tools of value to health service management and planners.

Originality/value

Consumer and community engagements are critical to the development of consumer-centric services. However, this should complement and add value to, not divert attention away from established principles of service planning, continuous quality improvement and programme evaluation. To do so may result in poorer quality health and well-being outcomes, reduced efficiency and ultimately reduced consumer and community satisfaction with services. This paper examines consumer and community engagement within the broader planning and quality improvement framework and practical implications for keeping planning, research and evaluation on track.

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Paola De Bernardi and Lia Tirabeni

The purpose of this paper is to analyse a sustainable business model (SBM) implemented by an Alternative Food Network (AFN), namely the Italian Food Assembly, with the…

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1024

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse a sustainable business model (SBM) implemented by an Alternative Food Network (AFN), namely the Italian Food Assembly, with the goal of exploring its drivers of success and explaining how it can contribute to enhance sustainable and anti-consumption behaviours. This research aims at combining principles from both SBM innovation and user-driven anti-consumption and well-being habits, in order to develop more successful, comprehensive and community-centred sustainable value propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the research goal, an exploratory case study was prepared where multiple sources of data were employed, namely in-depth interviews, participant observation, focus groups and document analysis.

Findings

In the light of the Bocken et al. (2014) framework, this paper provides evidence on the implementation of an AFN where it is possible to observe a strong sharing of knowledge regarding sustainable consumption behaviours and an effective dissemination of best practices between members. The authors developed four propositions that support the creation of a sustainable food supply chain, laying the foundation for spreading consumer behaviours and motivations so that they become more sustainable in their consumption habits.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the case study is very rich in the amount of data gathered, it cannot be generalised. Further research will overcome this limitation by adding more cases within a comparative approach and through a quantitative methodology.

Originality/value

It adds value to recent literature and practice by focussing on how networks of producers, consumers and other actors could act to improve food anti-consumption behaviours, by embodying alternatives to conventional food systems.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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