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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Álvaro Hernán Galvis, Angélica Avalo, Alexandra Ramírez, Diana Carolina Cortés and Helmman Cantor

The REDINGE2 – Reengineering Engineering Teaching, version 2 – project seeks to transform engineering education practices at the University of los Andes (UNIANDES) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The REDINGE2 – Reengineering Engineering Teaching, version 2 – project seeks to transform engineering education practices at the University of los Andes (UNIANDES) by using technology-based active learning strategies in courses from different disciplines that are to be reformed using a Big-ideas approach. Studies from this two-year project (2017-2018) seek to solve three main questions: What changes in engineering teaching conceptions, methods, tools and practices could be generated by reengineering courses using a Big-ideas approach? What changes in key conditions of learning environments have the students perceived in courses that use a Big-ideas approach? What lessons can be derived from the initial studies of REDINGE2’s pilot experiences?

Design/methodology/approach

The REDINGE2 project was conceived as a technology-based educational transformation initiative. It is the Faculty of Engineering at UNIANDES’ explicit intention to move engineering teaching from being content-focused to being big-ideas focused. It also wants to migrate from teacher-centered teaching strategies to student- and group-centered approaches. Additionally, this project intends to enrich engineering education ecologies with digital resources by integrating experiential, flexible and collaborative digital learning environments with traditional classroom/workshop/library/home/work learning settings. To promote this organic change, the project implemented a facilitation-from-the side strategy, which redesigned 14 engineering courses: each was given a two-year grant from the Office of the Dean of Engineering to rethink teaching practices and redesign the course. A cybernetic evaluation system was embedded in the life cycle of the transformation process that could support decision-making through each of the project’s stages (Stufflebeam, 1971). Questions of interest in this study are provided with information using triangulation of data at different times during each course’s redesign process.

Findings

After a year and half of the two-year REDINGE2 project (2017-2018), it is possible to say the following three research questions are fully solved. Concerning Question #1: What changes in engineering teaching conceptions, methods, tools and practices contribute to reengineering courses when using a Big-ideas approach? Participating teaching staff have demonstrated changes in their teaching conceptions, methods and resources, which can be attributed to their exposure to active-learning strategies supported by digital technologies. In fact, each one has redesigned and pilot tested at least one restructured learning unit for one of their courses according to the proposed Big-ideas approach; in addition, most admit to already having adjusted their teaching practices by changing their mindset regarding learning and how to promote it. Concerning Question #2: What changes in key conditions of learning environments have the students perceived in courses that have been redesigned using a Big-ideas approach? Data collected from students and participating staff members, both before the redesign and throughout this process, have provided teachers and students with feedback concerning perceived changes in learning environments. This has had positive results and provided opportunities for improvement. Concerning Question #3: What lessons can be derived from REDINGE2’s pilot experiences? Lessons from this project are multi-dimensional and there are organizational, pedagogic, technological and cultural considerations. A decalogue of critical success factors was established, which considered the things that must go right to successfully accomplish proposed educational transformations.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a good case of educational transformations in engineering teaching. No generalizations should be made, but it shows that similar processes of planned change can be made in tertiary science, math, engineering and technology (SMET) education.

Practical implications

The lessons learned from this experience are very valuable for higher education decision-makers who want to innovate by using learning ecologies in their institutions. In addition, theoretical considerations that illuminate the innovation process become very useful to help provide a foundation to similar interventions.

Originality/value

A non-conventional approach to integrate digital technologies in higher education teaching is the most significant contribution this experience has made. Its focus has been to transform educational practices with pedagogically sound uses of digital technologies instead of just integrating technologies in current SMET teaching practices. Facilitation-from-the-side and embedded cybernetic evaluation through the transformation process are key ideas that add value to organic change processes.

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Sui Lin Goei, Wouter R. van Joolingen, Floortje Goettsch, Anne Khaled, Tom Coenen, Sjors G.J.G. In ’t Veld, Siebrich de Vries and Tijmen M. Schipper

The purpose of this study is to explore how lesson study (LS) can be transitioned to an online mode, with the purpose to derive recommendations for performing online LS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how lesson study (LS) can be transitioned to an online mode, with the purpose to derive recommendations for performing online LS while being loyal to the defining elements of a face-to-face LS.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical analysis into the core components and procedures of LS resulted in five big ideas that capture essentials of LS. Using these big ideas, constraints were derived for online LS and a pilot online LS was performed. Data were collected on the process and team members' reflections. The experience in the pilot was mapped against the outcomes of the theoretical analysis.

Findings

Setting up close collaboration and the observation of the online lesson appeared to be the most challenging issues. A set of recommendations in the form of do's and don'ts was derived from the experience.

Practical implications

The set of recommendations can be applied by practitioners who face the challenge of performing LS in an online environment, and can serve as a start for further research in online LS.

Originality/value

The original contribution of the article is the combination of the theoretical analysis of LS combined with the practical experience in the pilot. This gives rise to a framework that can help understanding LS in general and online environments in particular.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 March 2017

Abstract

Details

The Imagination Gap
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-207-7

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Book part
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Karen Jaw-Madson

Abstract

Details

Culture Your Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-899-6

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Abstract

Details

The Imagination Gap
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-207-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2011

Bob Hudson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual and policy underpinnings of the UK Government's “Big Society” programme.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conceptual and policy underpinnings of the UK Government's “Big Society” programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses secondary research: a review and analysis of published sources – official and unofficial.

Findings

The “Big Society” concept is unclear but seems more focused upon extending the principle of markets than increasing community cohesion. This may do little to encourage the shared endeavour which is known to be necessary for service integration focused on individuals. Co‐production would be a better concept to underpin the Big Society.

Originality/value

There have been few attempts to undertake a broad analysis of the Big Society idea and critically explore the whole programme.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Lucia M. Flevares and Jamie R. Schiff

The conceptual framework of mathematical modeling (e.g., Lesh & Doerr, 2003) is a vital area in mathematics education research, and its implementation has potential for…

Abstract

The conceptual framework of mathematical modeling (e.g., Lesh & Doerr, 2003) is a vital area in mathematics education research, and its implementation has potential for deeply involving children in integrated and meaningful learning. In mathematical modeling learners are active agents in content-integrated, real-world problem solving. This emphasis on integrating multiple content areas to answer big questions, the pursuit of mathematical modeling, descends from Dewey’s work. We present the definition, principles, and design of modeling practices for readers who may be familiar with early childhood curriculum but less so with using modeling for learning. We explore the application of mathematical modeling to early childhood classrooms and its compatibility with early childhood pedagogies and philosophies. Young children may often be underestimated, assumed to be unable to pose big questions that can be answered through activity, experience, and data; but we discuss how young children can be engaged in problems through mathematical modeling. Finally, as preservice teacher educators, we discuss preparing preservice and in-service teachers for modeling in their classrooms. We offer examples and guidance for early childhood teachers to engage in authentic practice – meeting children where their interests are and creating integrated problem-solving experiences.

Details

Learning Across the Early Childhood Curriculum
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-700-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Leonard L. Berry

Big Ideas in Services Marketing”, published in 1987, identified seven precepts fundamental to the just emerging field; this paper aims to explore the relevance of these…

Abstract

Purpose

Big Ideas in Services Marketing”, published in 1987, identified seven precepts fundamental to the just emerging field; this paper aims to explore the relevance of these ideas three decades later and discuss what should be changed and what should be added.

Design/methodology/approach

Deep reflection on the central ideas proposed in a paper written 30 years ago through the lens of the author’s personal research and learning journey was the basis for preparing this retrospective essay.

Findings

The seven ideas presented in the original paper have stood the test of time although one of the seven “services branding” was incompletely developed. After 30 years, four more ideas need to be added, i.e. competing on value, meeting and exceeding customers’ expectations, saving customers’ time and effort, and generosity.

Originality/value

The proposals in the 1987 paper offered an early framework for consideration by scholars who have produced a worthy body of work and brought services marketing into its own as a legitimate discipline.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Judit Kárpáti-Daróczi and Tibor János Karlovitz

We consider start-up companies that have been established for rapid growth and are active in the international market. In this study, we examine the conditions required…

Abstract

We consider start-up companies that have been established for rapid growth and are active in the international market. In this study, we examine the conditions required for starting a start-up. We analyze how it is possible to add value to an idea that makes a business unique. First, we’ll show you when to talk about start-up. The starting point is that a start-up company is organized on a community basis. This much greater knowledge is coupled with high-level technological competences. In addition, there is a need for some “big idea,” innovation, which investors see as fantasy. A new niche market must be found where hundreds of thousands of customers worldwide can be served without any geographical constraints. The founder must have a high-risk appetite, and even naughtiness, because the novelty he invented will narrow the market of others and harm the interests of others. Here’s a look at the financing options for start-ups. At the end of this chapter you will find case studies on different start-ups.

Details

Managing Customer Experiences in an Omnichannel World: Melody of Online and Offline Environments in the Customer Journey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-389-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Gergely Nyilasy, Robin Canniford and Peggy J. Kreshel

– The purpose of this paper is to map advertising agency practitioners' mental models of creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map advertising agency practitioners' mental models of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 30 in-depth interviews among top-level advertising agency executives (creative, account and planning directors) were conducted. Design and data analysis followed the grounded theory paradigm of qualitative research.

Findings

Complementing earlier studies in advertising creativity, a multi-dimensional system of practitioner mental models was discovered. Substantive models depict agency professionals' core understanding of advertising creativity and its dialectical structure. Developmental models conceptualise the intrapersonal acquisition of creative skill as well as the social context in which advertising creativity is generated. Effectiveness models introduce native explanations for the market effectiveness of creativity. Interrelationships between the identified models are presented in detail.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding the mental models of advertising executives enriches the literature on the production side of marketing culture.

Practical implications

Shared understandings of mental models between advertising agencies and client brand management teams have the promise of reducing agency-client conflict.

Originality/value

The study's contribution is threefold: it provides an integrated view on advertising practitioners' multifaceted mental models about creativity (an area that has received little prior research attention); it models these mental models in their dynamic interaction, going beyond previous accounts that looked at topical areas in creativity in relative isolation; it redresses an imbalance in marketing theory between the production and consumption contexts of marketplace culture formation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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