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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2021

Fredrick Otike and Ágnes Hajdu Barát

Due to globalization, digitization and advanced technology, academic libraries are experiencing a tremendous change in their role and operations. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to globalization, digitization and advanced technology, academic libraries are experiencing a tremendous change in their role and operations. The purpose of this study is to critically examine and establish the emerging trends of academic libraries in Kenya; this study also highlights some of the critical roles of the academic libraries in relation to the emerging trends.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted the literature review method to critically analyse and establish the various roles and emerging trends and issues in academic libraries in Kenya.

Findings

This study established that change is inevitable and that academic libraries are supposed to adapt to the emerging trending trends and roles, lest their function and service become redundant. Due to the fact that library users’ information needs and information-seeking behaviour are changing, academic libraries are supposed to devise new and innovative ways of reaching out to their clients.

Originality/value

This study has been able to comprehensively create a new viewpoint of the role and emerging trends of academic libraries in Kenya in regards to the changing and advancement of new technology.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2017

Jennine A. Knight

As is the case of all organizations, the academic library is a body reflecting the contribution of its core employees. As such, the roles performed by academic librarians…

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2000

Abstract

Purpose

As is the case of all organizations, the academic library is a body reflecting the contribution of its core employees. As such, the roles performed by academic librarians are crucial to its development and existence. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of academic librarians as change champions in an information age that has been, still is, and is expected to be continuously pervaded by varying and widespread changes in librarianship and scholarship coupled with the ever changing and expanding user needs and expectations. The paper also identifies a framework to perform this role.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is informed by opinion and draws on relevant literature to highlight the current climate and what is being perceived as valuable to the future direction of academic libraries in order to bring credence to its trajectory.

Findings

Academic librarians must readily accept, be responsive to, and anticipate change to maintain and justify their relevance to stakeholders. Yet, anecdotal evidence suggests that not all librarians are prepared to embrace change.

Practical implications

Academic librarians must understand how their roles influence the decision-making processes of the stakeholders and vice versa.

Originality/value

The paper advances five principles or 5As to guide the change process in academic libraries: alignment, accountability, agility, accessibility, and assessment. Very briefly, it discusses the relevance of a concept referred to as the competition-collaboration continuum to further academic librarianship. These notions serve to assist academic librarians in determining the appropriate actions to be taken now.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Claire Creaser, Susanne Cullen, Ruth Curtis, Nicola Darlington, Jane Maltby, Elizabeth Newall and Valerie Spezi

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the findings of two studies investigating the value of academic libraries to teaching and research staff in higher education…

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1215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the findings of two studies investigating the value of academic libraries to teaching and research staff in higher education institutions. The Working Together (WT) project was an international study, funded by SAGE Publishing, investigating the value of academic libraries for teaching and research staff in the USA, UK and Scandinavia. The Raising Academic Impact (RAI) project was an initiative of the University of Nottingham (UoN) aimed at increasing the impact of academic librarians in departments across the university by assessing perception and awareness of current library services and future needs of academic staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The WT project was conducted during Spring 2012, comprising a series of eight case studies and an online survey exploring the case study experiences and findings within their wider regional and academic context. One was conducted at the UoN, and included the RAI project. The RAI project was originally a four-phase initiative conducted by academic librarians at the UoN. The first phase, which is reported in this paper, consisted of a survey of teaching and research staff, distributed in summer 2012, investigating awareness, uptake and value of existing services, as well as demand for new library services.

Findings

Determining the value of academic libraries is a challenging task as very little evidence (beyond the anecdotal) is collected. Perceptions of library value vary greatly between what librarians think the value of their library is to academic staff and how academic staff actually value their library. Information literacy and study skills teaching are greatly valued by academic staff. Despite current efforts, research support is still limited, owing to a cultural barrier hampering greater collaboration between libraries and academic staff in this area. Communication and marketing are keys to increase the value of academic libraries to teaching and research staff.

Originality/value

This paper presents the key findings from the two studies in parallel. It is anticipated that these discoveries will be of interest to the wider library community to help libraries develop services which are closely linked to the needs of teaching and academic staff.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Patrick Griffis

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community…

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1134

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide examples and best practices of an academic library’s strategy of collaborating with community agencies in assisting community entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper reflects on the evolution of a new service role for an academic library in providing outreach to community entrepreneurs and is limited to the best practices and lessons learned of one academic library.

Findings

This conceptual paper reflects on an academic library’s outreach strategy for assisting community entrepreneurs; collaboration with community agencies is featured as a best practice with examples and lessons learned.

Originality/value

A recent national study of academic business librarians’ outreach to entrepreneurs has established collaboration with community agencies as an effective service strategy. This conceptual paper reflects on the use of this strategy in a specific academic library’s outreach efforts to community entrepreneurs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Ivana Hebrang Grgic

The purpose of this paper is to provide information on handling gifts‐in‐kind in Croatian public and academic libraries. It also recommends what should be done to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide information on handling gifts‐in‐kind in Croatian public and academic libraries. It also recommends what should be done to improve practice with gifts for collections.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the author's research conducted using an anonymous online questionnaire that was sent to Croatian public libraries (n=139) and academic libraries (n=73) in May 2011. After a two‐week period, a total of 84 responses was received (40 public libraries and 44 academic libraries). In statistical analysis, some variables are tested by χ2‐test to show whether differences between public and academic libraries are statistically significant.

Findings

The majority of Croatian libraries do not have gift policy statements. Gifts do have a significant part in collection building, especially in Croatian academic libraries, but are not always handled in the right way (i.e. according to IFLA's guidelines). This paper shows the quantity of gifts in the libraries, librarians' reasons for not accepting some gifts, librarians' methods in dealing with gifts, and their way of communicating with donors or potential donors.

Originality/value

This paper gives results of the first complete study of gift policies in Croatian public and academic libraries. In conclusion, a need for a written gift policy in Croatian libraries is emphasized and some recommendations are given.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Mark‐Shane E. Scale

The purpose of this paper is primarily to report on a 2011 online discussion on tablets and their adoption in libraries, as observed by the researcher in blog postings and…

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831

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is primarily to report on a 2011 online discussion on tablets and their adoption in libraries, as observed by the researcher in blog postings and micro‐blog postings.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher examined blogs and tweets about the diffusion of tablets in academic libraries to find out why early adopters or academic librarians adopted tablets and implemented them into library services.

Findings

Results reveal that academic librarians and libraries adopt and integrate tablets into library services because they can offer wireless access to the library's e‐collection and e‐resources in ways better than e‐readers or smartphones and because librarians have some level of familiarity with using tablets for their own work purposes before they considered extending such purposes to users.

Practical implications

Academic libraries are investing in devices to facilitate users' access to growing e‐resources. Tablet devices are one such option. However, many tablets are expensive, equalling or totalling more than the costs of laptops. The decision to adopt and implement them into library services needs to be informed by the experiences of others, in order to determine if it is a worthwhile purchase.

Originality/value

This paper departs from the general pattern of library literature on the subject of tablet adoption, by breaking with the tradition of being only informed by practice and emerging trial and error, to a more reflective approach to those experiences informed by Rogers' theory of the diffusions of innovations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Helen H. Spalding and Jian Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of marketing in academic libraries and how the marketing concept is applied in practice to marketing academic library

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4580

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of marketing in academic libraries and how the marketing concept is applied in practice to marketing academic library services through the experiences of academic libraries across the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on using marketing as a managerial tool to accomplish strategic organizational goals and objectives, discusses challenges and opportunities in academic library marketing, presents examples demonstrating innovative methods that academic libraries have used to market their images and services, and offers suggestions for developing marketing plans and strategies.

Findings

The paper finds that market research allows libraries to understand better the points of view of their student and faculty library users, as well as the perspectives of campus administrations and the community external to the college. The result is that the library is more successful in gaining visibility and support for its efforts, and library users are more successful in making the best use of the services available to them to meet their academic and research goals.

Originality/value

The paper offers practical solutions for academic libraries in the global community.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Raghini S. Suresh, Cynthia C. Ryans and Wei‐Ping Zhang

The primary function of an academic library is to serve as aninformation resource centre for the entire academic community. In orderto provide better service to academic

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1186

Abstract

The primary function of an academic library is to serve as an information resource centre for the entire academic community. In order to provide better service to academic patrons, liaison programmes have been established in some colleges and universities. Very little has been written on liaison activities or the role of subject specialists in academic libraries. Focusses on how to implement a successful liaison programme in order to facilitate library collection building and improve communication with the academic units. Defines the concept of liaison librarians and library representatives in academic units, and provides suggestions for setting up such a programme.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Michael Heery

This paper examines the growth of research in polytechnics. It considers the extent to which polytechnic libraries are able to support academic research. The role of large…

Abstract

This paper examines the growth of research in polytechnics. It considers the extent to which polytechnic libraries are able to support academic research. The role of large research collections, such as exist in many university libraries is discussed. The paper argues that polytechnic libraries can best support research not by emulating the collection‐building policies of the universities, but rather by developing active information services. It uses a case study from Brighton Polytechnic to demonstrate how a successful service has been offered to researchers in the subject fields of accountancy, business and management. Analysis of online search records and of a survey of academic staff is used to evaluate the efforts of Brighton Polytechnic library to provide a useful service to academic researchers.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Nokuphiwa Kunene and Patrick Mapulanga

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the adoption of transformational leadership qualities in South African libraries in Gauteng Province.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the adoption of transformational leadership qualities in South African libraries in Gauteng Province.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative approach with open-ended questions that yielded some qualitative data. For the study, a multi-case study design was used. The study specifically targeted participants by identifying three directors of academic libraries in Gauteng. The criteria for selecting the three directors were that two of the universities are residential research-intensive universities, and the third is an academic library of a distance learning university. Atlas.ti8 was used to analyse the data, which was then presented using thematic content analysis.

Findings

Thematic areas for leaders of the 21st century, as mentioned by the directors, were a mixed bag. That empowerment was suggested by the first academic director. The appropriate leadership qualities were fiduciary, analytical, pragmatic, transformative and visionary. The second academic director proposed consultative, innovative and adaptable approaches, while the third proposed collaborative, ethical and adaptive approaches.

Practical implications

Transformative leadership is required, particularly in the aftermath of technological advances and pandemics such as COVID-19, which have altered the way academic libraries should operate.

Originality/value

Many studies on transformative leadership have been conducted. However, in the aftermath of technological advancements and pandemics such as COVID-19, the role of transformative leadership remained untested. This study fills the void.

Details

Library Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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