Search results

1 – 10 of over 46000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Neil Davidson

Describes how the influence of feminist thinking has altered the approach to sex education for young women, while young men remain damaged and restricted by rigid…

Downloads
1300

Abstract

Describes how the influence of feminist thinking has altered the approach to sex education for young women, while young men remain damaged and restricted by rigid stereotypes of men. Suggests that, while women have done good work on sex education with boys, men should also get involved in sex education for boys, providing an alternative for the stereotype that men do not talk seriously about sex. Provides some suggestions for ways of carrying out this work.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Claire H. Griffiths

The purpose of this monograph is to present the first English translation of a unique French colonial report on women living under colonial rule in West Africa.

Downloads
2088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this monograph is to present the first English translation of a unique French colonial report on women living under colonial rule in West Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The issue begins with a discussion of the contribution this report makes to the history of social development policy in Africa, and how it serves the on‐going critique of colonisation. This is followed by the English translation of the original report held in the National Archives of Senegal. The translation is accompanied by explanatory notes, translator’s comments, a glossary of African and technical terms, and a bibliography.

Findings

The discussion highlights contemporary social development policies and practices which featured in identical or similar forms in French colonial social policy.

Practical implications

As the report demonstrates, access to basic education and improving maternal/infant health care have dominated the social development agenda for women in sub‐Saharan Africa for over a century, and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future in the Millennium Development Goals which define the international community’s agenda for social development to 2015. The parallels between colonial and post‐colonial social policies in Africa raise questions about the philosophical and cultural foundations of contemporary social development policy in Africa and the direction policy is following in the 21st century.

Originality/value

Though the discussion adopts a consciously postcolonial perspective, the report that follows presents a consciously colonial view of the “Other”. Given the parallels identified here between contemporary and colonial policy‐making, this can only add to the value of the document in exploring the values that underpin contemporary social development practice.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ruth Simpson and Yochanan Altman

This article presents evidence on the career success of young women managers and suggests an interaction between age and seniority as young women managers outpace their…

Downloads
5274

Abstract

This article presents evidence on the career success of young women managers and suggests an interaction between age and seniority as young women managers outpace their male counterparts in career progression. Hence the glass ceiling may be seen as “time bounded”. Three alternative explanations are presented: a sea change in women’s careers; that young women’s careers are fundamentally different from older women’s; that the glass ceiling moved up the hierarchy and affects only senior positions.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Emma Dresler and Margaret Anderson

The risk associated with heavy episodic drinking in young people has caused concern among public health professionals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The risk associated with heavy episodic drinking in young people has caused concern among public health professionals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the gender differences in the perception of risk in alcohol consumption behaviour for better targeting of messages.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative descriptive study examines the narratives of 28 young people’s experience of a “night out” framed as the Alcohol Consumption Journey to examine the ways young men and women experience context-specific risks for alcohol use.

Findings

The young people perceived participation in the Alcohol Consumption Journey involved risk to their personal safety. Both young men and young women described their alcohol consumption as controlled and perceived the risks as external inevitabilities linked to the public drinking establishments. However, they displayed noticeable gender-based differences in the perception and management of risk in diverse contexts of the Alcohol Consumption Journey. Young women drink in close friendship groups and have a collective view of risk and constructed group strategies to minimise it. Comparatively, the young men’s drinking group is more changeable and adopted a more individualistic approach to managing risk. Both groups exhibited prosocial tendencies to protect themselves and their friends when socialising together.

Originality/value

The concept of “edgework” is effective in providing an explanatory framework for understanding young people’s ritualised Alcohol Consumption Journey and to illustrate the context-specific risks associated with alcohol use.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Silke Uebelmesser

Abstract

Details

Unfunded Pension Systems: Ageing and Variance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-732-6

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Lisa McNeill and Jacob McKay

The purpose of this study is to explore how fashion clothing is perceived and consumed by young males, what their attitudes are toward fashion and how fashion is used in…

Downloads
1529

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore how fashion clothing is perceived and consumed by young males, what their attitudes are toward fashion and how fashion is used in the construction of a social identity by these men.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach is used in this research, with the fashion consumption behaviours and perceptions of males aged between 19 and 25 explored.

Findings

Results note the positive role of social comparison amongst young men in their fashion-seeking behaviour, with fashion consumption playing a large role in the emotional well-being of young men in a social context.

Research limitations/implications

This research was exploratory in nature and used a small sample of males from a specific age cohort. As such, the results cannot be generalized but do offer analytical insights into male attitudes and behaviour toward fashion that can be extended in future research.

Practical implications

While the act of shopping for clothing was traditionally seen as a female recreation, fragmentation of the traditional male/female dichotomy has seen men become active in the social consumption ethic surrounding fashion. The current study examines the emergence of fashion-aware males and offers insight into the key motivations for young males to seek out fashion products.

Social implications

In a society where fashion seeking is a popular recreational activity across genders and changing notions of masculinity allow for more appearance focused men, shopping for clothes is no longer considered an exclusively female activity.

Originality/value

Where research has previously examined fashion items and their integral role in product-self extension from a female perspective, very little studies focus on males’ relationships with fashion. Whilst prior research has examined men’s self-image and self-modification via exercise or plastic surgery, there is little that focuses on the role of clothing in men’s identity creation.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Abstract

This paper shows how a shorter fecundity horizon for females (a biological constraint) leads to age and educational disparities between husbands and wives. Empirical support is based on data from a natural experiment commencing before and ending after China’s 1980 one-child law. The results indicate that fertility in China declined by about 1.2–1.4 births per woman as a result of China’s anti-natalist policies. Concomitantly spousal age and educational differences narrowed by approximately 0.5–1.0 and 1.0–1.6 years, respectively. These decreases in the typical husband’s age and educational advantages are important in explaining the division of labor in the home, often given as a cause for the gender wage gap. Indeed, as fertility declined, which has been the historical trend in most developed countries, husband-wife age and educational differences diminished leading to less division of labor in the home and a smaller gender wage disparity. Unlike other models of division of labor in the home which rely on innately endogenous factors, this paper’s theory is based on an exogenous biological constraint.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Anil Joshi

This study seeks to explore the perceptions of young men in Uganda regarding their sexual behaviour, which is normally understood as “high risk” in terms of HIV/AIDS…

Downloads
419

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the perceptions of young men in Uganda regarding their sexual behaviour, which is normally understood as “high risk” in terms of HIV/AIDS. Specifically, the paper aims to look at the practice of engaging with multiple sexual partners (MSP).

Design/methodology/approach

Six 15‐19 year old school‐going young men in rural Uganda played an attribute‐ranking game, wrote personal stories and acted in small dramas as part of the data collection.

Findings

The participants of the study spoke about love and sex being important in a relationship, which is why they engaged in MSP, to maximise their experience of both. MSP also allowed the young men to gain pleasure, experience and control: three necessary and sought‐after attributes inherent in their notion of masculinity. The features that challenged these three factors (i.e. money, manipulative girls, parental control), which threatened their ideals of masculinity, were identified by participants as the primary risks of MSP, rather than health threats.

Originality/approach

A more open‐minded and positive emphasis is needed regarding the use of condoms, where pleasure and issues of “manliness” are incorporated. By understanding the experiential views of young men, HIV/AIDS prevention programmes can be adapted accordingly to better reflect their lived realities.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Ciann L. Wilson and Sarah Flicker

This paper, and the corresponding project, is motivated by the lack of qualitative research elucidating the voices of young Black women in Canada when it comes to their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, and the corresponding project, is motivated by the lack of qualitative research elucidating the voices of young Black women in Canada when it comes to their sexual health.

Methodology/approach

This paper draws from data produced in the Let’s Talk About Sex (LTAS) project – a Photovoice process held once a week for nine consecutive weeks in the Jane-Finch community, a low-income community in Toronto, Canada. This workshop was completed by 15 young African Caribbean and Black (ACB) women in the age group 14–18. These young women used photography and creative writing to express their opinions on the barriers and facilitators to making healthy sexual decisions.

Findings

A central finding was the existence of a subculture among youth in Toronto, where the exchange of sex for material resources was commonplace. Herein, we unpack the various forms of economically motivated relationships reported, which ranged from romantic relationships to sugar daddies and brothel-like sex dens. We also reflect on the discussions at community forums where the research findings were presented. From shock and outrage to a sly smile of knowing, the responses were often gendered, generational and reflective of a trend occurring across Toronto, not just in the Jane-Finch community, and not merely among the Black youth.

Research implications

Effective interventions and youth programs should focus on the sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV risks that may result from transactional relationships, economic empowerment, and youth employment.

Originality/value

This is a novel arts-based study on youth engaged inthe exchange of sex for money, which has nuanced differences from survival sex.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Irene Selwaness and Rania Roushdy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the school-to-work transition of young people from subsequent school exit cohorts between 2001 and 2012 in Egypt, thus, presenting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the school-to-work transition of young people from subsequent school exit cohorts between 2001 and 2012 in Egypt, thus, presenting an early evidence on the adjustments of the labor market in terms of patterns of youth transition to a first job following the 2011 Egyptian uprising.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis compares the early employment outcomes of those who left school after the January 25, 2011 uprising to that of those who left before 2011. The authors also separately control for the cohorts who left school in 2008 and 2009, in an attempt to disentangle any labor market adjustments that might have happened following the financial crisis, and before the revolution. Using novel and unexploited representative data from the 2014 Survey of Young People in Egypt (SYPE), the authors estimate the probability of transition to any first job within 18 months from leaving education and that of the transition to a good-quality job, controlling for the year of school exit. The authors also estimate the hazard of finding a first job and a good-quality job using survival analysis.

Findings

School exit cohorts of 2008–2009 (following the financial crisis) and those of 2011–2012 (in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings) experienced a significantly higher likelihood of finding a first job within 18 months than that of the cohorts of 2001–2007. However, this came at the expense of the quality of job, conditional on having found a first job. The results of the hazard model show that school leavers after 2008 who were not able to transition to a job shortly after leaving school experienced longer unemployment spells than their peers who left school before 2007. The odds of finding a good-quality job appears to decline with time spent in non-employment or in a bad-quality first job.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to a limited, yet growing, literature on how school-to-work transition evolved during the global financial crisis and the Egyptian 2011 revolution. Using data from SYPE 2014, the most recent representative survey conducted in Egypt on youth and not previously exploited to study youth school-to-work transition, the paper investigates the short-term adjustments of the youth labor market opportunities during that critical period of Egypt and the region’s history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 46000