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1 – 10 of over 10000
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Dongjin Li, Ying Jiang, Shenghui An, Zhe Shen and Wenji Jin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how young Chinese consumers' money attitudes influence their compulsive buying behavior.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how young Chinese consumers' money attitudes influence their compulsive buying behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 303 undergraduate students from Tianjin and Ningbo (two major cities in coastal China) answered a self‐administered questionnaire.

Findings

Money attitudes were found to significantly affect young Chinese consumers' compulsive buying behaviour. Specifically, the Retention‐Time dimension significantly affected both male and female consumers' compulsive buying. However, the Power‐Prestige dimension only affected male consumers' compulsive buying. Finally, the Quality dimension had a greater impact on male than on female consumers' compulsive buying.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected in two major cities in the coastal region of China. Given the differences between coastal and inland China, caution must be taken when generalizing the research results to young consumers from inland China.

Practical implications

The discussion of the relationships between young Chinese consumers' money attitudes and their compulsive buying will help marketers and policy makers to better understand these consumers' spending behaviour. Thus, marketers can identify new market opportunities and form marketing strategies to target young consumers in China. On the other hand, policy makers can also form more effective education strategies to help young consumers to spend wisely.

Originality/value

Different from previous research in money attitudes and compulsive behaviour, the research provides an in‐depth overview of how male and female young Chinese consumers perceive money and how their beliefs about money affect their spending.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Ting Jin, Wei Shao, Deborah Griffin and Mitchell Ross

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method is used including focus groups and in-depth personal interviews with young Chinese consumers who are currently living and working in Australia.

Findings

Two key findings emerge from the results, namely, young Chinese consumers attach symbolic values to Chinese brands and Chinese brands are perceived positively by young Chinese consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that symbolic values (such as pride, lifestyle, feeling of home and being happy) constitute one of the primary motivations for young Chinese consumers’ purchase of domestic brands. The results of this study challenge the traditional view that Chinese brands are perceived negatively in the Chinese market.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few studies investigating how young Chinese consumers perceive brands from their home country rather than foreign brands.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Hongwei “Chris” Yang, Hui Liu and Liuning Zhou

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Palka et al.'s model to predict young Chinese

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Palka et al.'s model to predict young Chinese consumers' mobile viral attitudes, intents and behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A paper survey was administered to 835 college students in Beijing, Shanghai, Kunming, and Liuzhou in summer and fall, 2010. The data were subject to statistic analyses including Pearson correlation, structural equation modeling, and backward regression with SPSS and AMOS.

Findings

The SEM model testing results confirmed the chain of young Chinese consumers' viral attitudes to intents to actual behavior. Subjective norm, perceived cost and pleasure were significant predictors of their viral attitudes. Their viral attitudes, perceived utility and subjective norm predicted their intent to pass along entertaining electronic messages. Their intent to forward useful electronic messages was determined by their viral attitudes, perceived utility and market mavenism. Their viral attitudes, intents and market mavenism predicted their mobile viral behavior.

Practical implications

It pays to foster Chinese consumers' favorable attitudes toward mobile viral marketing. It is advisable to know both target consumers and their associates very well. It is recommended to convince Chinese consumers that their friends and relatives can benefit greatly from viral content forwarding. Mobile messages with entertaining, useful, relevant and self‐involved values can go viral more easily.

Originality/value

The paper is probably the first study the integration of the TPB, TAM and Palka et al.'s model to predict Chinese consumers' mobile viral attitudes, intents and behavior.

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Jin Su, Kittichai (Tu) Watchravesringkan, Jianheng Zhou and Maria Gil

The purpose of this paper is to understand US and Chinese young Millennials’ perceptions of and consumption behaviour towards sustainable apparel products.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand US and Chinese young Millennials’ perceptions of and consumption behaviour towards sustainable apparel products.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research was conducted, and empirical data were collected from 590 US college students and 379 Chinese college students.

Findings

For both US and Chinese young Millennials, this study provides consistent empirical results of the positive and significant effects of young Millennials’ apparel sustainability knowledge and personal values on consumer attitude towards sustainable clothing, which in turn positively and strongly impacts purchase intention. In addition, a cross-cultural comparative analysis reveals similarities and differences regarding apparel sustainability knowledge and values between young Millennial consumers in the US and China.

Originality/value

The scale of environmental and social impacts from global apparel production and consumption makes sustainability increasingly important in the contemporary business environment. Young Millennials in the US and China represent large and influential consumer segments for sustainable consumption. This study contributes to the literature by surveying young Millennials in the US (developed market) and China (emerging market) in a cross-cultural context. The study offers insights into the global apparel industry in developing strategies for expanding sustainable apparel markets in the US and China.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Chui Yim Wong, Michael J. Polonsky and Romana Garma

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) sub‐components (i.e. design, assembly and parts), as well as the extent to which consumer

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of country of origin (COO) sub‐components (i.e. design, assembly and parts), as well as the extent to which consumer ethnocentrism tendencies interact with these COO sub‐components for young Chinese consumers with regards to product quality assessments and purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experimental design was used to examine the effects of the three sub‐components of COO with two levels of sourcing location – Home (China) and Foreign (Germany), for two high involvement products (an automobile and a digital camera). Chinese students in China represented the sample of 272 respondents. MANOVA was used to examine the direct effects and interactions of the three COO components, as well as ethnocentrism, measured using the CETSCALE.

Findings

It was found that the three COO sub‐components did not influence young Chinese consumers’ evaluation of product quality or purchase intentions. In addition, consumers’ level of ethnocentrism also did not have a direct effect on perceived product quality or purchase intentions. There was only one statistically significant interaction effect between ethnocentrism and country of parts for one of the two products. As such, COO dimensions and young Chinese consumers’ ethnocentrism appears to have limited influence on their assessments of product quality or purchase intentions. This may occur because young Chinese consumers perceive that hybrid products are the norm for high involvement products in China as these products are all these consumers have experienced.

Originality/value

The findings of this research dispute the commonly held belief and evidence that sub‐components of COO have an impact on the perceptions of product quality and purchase intentions. Young Chinese consumers may be different to consumers from western countries because they have been extensively exposed to hybrid products. Given the size and growth potential of China, young Chinese are an important, under‐researched segment within the Chinese market.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Ling Jiang and Juan Shan

Despite the growing research regarding consumer luxury value perception and their influence on luxury consumption behavior in different cultural contexts, there is little…

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Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing research regarding consumer luxury value perception and their influence on luxury consumption behavior in different cultural contexts, there is little research investigating the cultural variation toward luxury within different generations in a given society. The purpose of this paper is to assess the relationships among Confucian propriety, luxury value perception, and purchase intention of luxury brands, and especially how these relationships differ between young and older consumers in a Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire survey in China. A multi-group structural equation model was used to test the conceptual model and research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that the effects of functional value and social value on purchase intention of luxury brands are stronger for older generations than younger ones, while the effects of self-identity and hedonic value on purchase intention are stronger for younger generations than older ones. The Confucian propriety relates positively to the functional value and social value; however, these effects are more salient for older consumers.

Originality/value

The results of this study reveal the evolution of luxury consumption values and behaviors of Chinese consumers, suggesting that marketers should no longer label Chinese luxury consumers with common behaviors. It is also recommended that marketers of luxury brands in China should adapt this shifting attitude and respond actively to the expectations of different generations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Srinivas Durvasula and Steven Lysonski

China is undergoing a radical change as the forces of industrialization and modernization transform its society. Money is taking on an increasingly important role…

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Abstract

Purpose

China is undergoing a radical change as the forces of industrialization and modernization transform its society. Money is taking on an increasingly important role, particularly among young Chinese, as the Western ideals of individualism and hedonism thrive. The goal of this research is to understand attitudes towards money in China and how these attitudes affect elements of consumer behavior such as materialism and vanity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a well‐accepted scale (with several dimensions) to explore attitudes towards money. Research questions examine how the dimensions of attitudes towards money affect materialism and achievement vanity. The sample comprises 127 young Chinese consumers. Statistical results based on confirmatory factor analysis as well as path analysis are reported.

Findings

The findings clearly show that attitudes towards money in China are not monolithic; instead there are variations among young Chinese. Materialism is affected by the power‐prestige and anxiety dimensions, but unaffected by the distrust dimension of money attitudes. Achievement vanity is affected by the power‐prestige dimension of money attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could examine other developing countries and other generational consumer segments. Another future research topic is to develop a comprehensive model of money attitudes, materialism, vanity, compulsive buying, and their possible antecedents or moderators.

Practical implications

These findings offer insight into the mindset of young Chinese. Beliefs that money permits one to attain not only status and possessions, but also power and control over others are contributing to increased materialism and expressions of vanity among young Chinese. For marketers, the results imply that positioning products based on the possession of money and the use of this money to indulge hedonism may resonate well with young Chinese consumers. However, some of the relationships we found may cause concern to ethicists and consumer watchdogs because of the associated problems of compulsive buying and other problems which are prevalent in consumer societies.

Originality/value

So far, no study has examined whether money attitudes drive materialism and achievement vanity, especially among younger consumers in developing countries such as China.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2015

Jinzhao Lu and Yingjiao Xu

This study aims to investigate Chinese young consumers’ brand loyalty toward sportswear products from a self-congruity perspective. With different performance observed…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate Chinese young consumers’ brand loyalty toward sportswear products from a self-congruity perspective. With different performance observed between global and domestic sportswear brands in the Chinese market, this study also aims to examine the impact of country of origin on Chinese young consumers’ behavior toward sportswear brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with street intercept method was conducted in Shanghai to collect data for this study. Multiple independent t-tests and structural equation modeling (SEM) with bootstrap method were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The SEM results indicate a significant influence of brand self-congruity on consumers’ brand association and perceived quality, which, in turn, influenced consumers’ brand loyalty. The multiple t-test results suggest a significant difference between Chinese and global sportswear brands in terms of consumers’ brand association and attitudinal brand loyalty. No significant difference was found in terms of consumers’ behavioral brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study comes from the convenience student sample.

Practical implications

First, brands need to strategically design the brand image to represent the largest segment of the target market. Second, while global brands could focus on their pricing strategies, domestic brands need to focus more on maintaining a positive brand association in consumers’ mind.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the self-congruity perspective of brand loyalty by empirically confirming the indirect effect of brand self-congruity on brand loyalty via the mediation effects of brand association and perceived quality in the context of the ever-growing Chinese sportswear market.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Vít Hinčica, Hana Řezanková and Jingyi Qi

The aim of the paper is to explore how Chinese consumers perceive the quality of cosmetics products and if the Chinese youth differs in the perception from older…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to explore how Chinese consumers perceive the quality of cosmetics products and if the Chinese youth differs in the perception from older generations. The paper fills the current research gap in revealing which intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are the most and least associated with cosmetic products’ quality by young and older Chinese consumers. It also inquiries about how other selected factors (e.g. type of store, store’s trade name, the use of influencers, etc.) contribute to the perceived quality of cosmetic products.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected from 423 Chinese respondents by an online questionnaire in their native language. Statistical tests of independence, correlation and cluster analysis were applied to reveal the relationships between variables.

Findings

The highest number of statistically significant dependencies of meritorious variables was associated with age groups of young and older consumers, thus suggesting greater differences in quality perception between younger and older Chinese generations. The paper also confirms that intrinsic cues prevail over extrinsic when consumers evaluate the quality of cosmetic products.

Practical implications

The results deepen the understanding of the current preferences of Chinese consumers of cosmetic products when assessing the quality of cosmetics and represent a solid basis for further research. Moreover, they may help companies from the cosmetics industry better comprehend how different categories of people determine cosmetic products’ quality.

Originality/value

The paper uses a large convenience sample of respondents from different Chinese regions and points to several differences between younger and older generations of Chinese consumers of cosmetics.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Steven Lysonski

The purpose of this paper was to examine psychological variables of young Chinese to determine their impact on identification with global consumer culture, attitudes…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine psychological variables of young Chinese to determine their impact on identification with global consumer culture, attitudes toward global and USA brands and intention to buy USA brands. The independent or psychological variables examined were self-monitoring, life satisfaction, brand relevance, social demonstration effect, change-seeking behavior and reference groups (interacted and non-interacted). The goal was to understand what forces drive global and USA brand preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in Guangzhou, China, in 2013 through a survey administered to 152 young Chinese respondents. Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability coefficients verified the psychometrics of each scale. Subsequently, the sample was divided into high versus low groups for each of the independent variables to perform mean tests for each on each of the four dependent variables.

Findings

The results showed that all the hypotheses were supported to some extent. The sample had a positive attitude toward all the dependent measures: identification with global consumer culture, global and USA brands and intention to buy USA brands. Self-monitoring and change-seeking behavior had the least association with the dependent variables. Brand relevance, social demonstration effect and interactive and non-interactive reference groups were all found to have strong support.

Research limitations/implications

The authors used an urban sample of young Chinese. Examining an older sample or one that was less urban would also be useful. Future research could also examine other emerging markets such as Brazil or Indonesia to identify the impact of the psychological variables.

Practical implications

Multinational firms wishing to grow revenues of their USA and global brands in China must be attuned to the social aspects of positioning their brands. The implications show that brand relevance, social demonstration and reference groups can be used for positioning of global and USA brands. As China is a collectivist society, using appeals that establish a brand’s desirability or relevance and its ability to allow users to socially demonstrate the brand to reference groups is likely to work well.

Originality/value

No study has assembled the variables in the manner investigated in this research, nor have other studies looked at young Chinese in terms of USA brand attitudes and identification with global consumer culture.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 10000