Search results

1 – 10 of over 15000
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Simon Kwok, Mark Uncles and Yimin Huang

Aims to review, update, and extend the understanding of country‐of‐origin (COO) effects in China. This involves examining the nature and extent of the COO effect amongst…

7655

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to review, update, and extend the understanding of country‐of‐origin (COO) effects in China. This involves examining the nature and extent of the COO effect amongst urban Chinese consumers and the impact of COO on actual purchase behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire is used to collect COO information from a sample of 432 Shanghai consumers and a consumer panel is used to track the purchase behaviour of the same consumers over 6 months.

Findings

First, Chinese consumers generally say they prefer to buy local Chinese grocery brands. Second, Chinese consumers believe it is important to buy local brands for a range of Chinese‐style and Western‐style product categories. Third, however, the stated preference for Chinese brands was generally not reflected in actual purchase behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The results support the growing view that Chinese consumers are not necessarily attracted to foreign brands. However, the disparity between stated preferences and behaviour suggests that there are other factors that may moderate the COO effect, such as imperfect knowledge of which brands are local or foreign.

Practical implications

To capitalize on the stated preference for local brands, and to address consumers’ imperfect knowledge of which brands are local or foreign, managers may benefit by promoting the Chinese origin of their brands and by positioning their brands as being local.

Originality/value

In contrast to the experimental designs used in previous studies, actual purchase data is measured here in a real‐life setting. The study provides a strong empirical update on the COO effect in China.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Paul F. Nunes, Susan A. Piotroski, Lay Lim Teo and R. Michael Matheis

As Chinese consumers become more affluent, their expectations about what a brand should deliver are rising. To better understand the challenges facing companies that want

4155

Abstract

Purpose

As Chinese consumers become more affluent, their expectations about what a brand should deliver are rising. To better understand the challenges facing companies that want to establish a brand in China, Accenture surveyed more than a thousand Chinese consumers to learn how they decide what to buy. This paper aims to examine those results.

Design/methodology/approach

Accenture conducted 1,022 interviews from China that surveyed consumers of six categories of products and services: automobiles, appliances, consumer packaged goods, financial services, high‐tech products and apparel. Consumers chosen for the China part of the study were generally younger and wealthier than the typical Chinese consumer – a reasonable proxy for the initial target audiences for brands attempting to succeed in China.

Findings

Accenture research shows that creating a successful brand in this environment requires a sophisticated understanding of what segments of the Chinese markets value in a brand and a willingness to reach China's increasingly choosy consumers through innovative media.

Practical implications

The data about Chinese consumers' expectations translate into seven core lessons for marketers. Three of the lessons offer ways to shape brand image and four suggest how to best communicate the brand message.

Originality/value

Analysis of the survey data identified six consumer segments, which – although they share much in common – each have particular differences in their set of brand values.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Yingwei Liu, Tao Wang, Ling Zhou and Chunyan Nie

The essence of “Chinese element” has been pinpointed as the representation of national cultural archetype resource of China, which reflects to the overall power…

Abstract

Purpose

The essence of “Chinese element” has been pinpointed as the representation of national cultural archetype resource of China, which reflects to the overall power enhancement of China. Applying the Chinese national cultural archetype resource, which will be used for promoting the Chinese Brand internationalization, aims for the consumers' approval with the hope of integrating and spreading the unique cultural advantage of Chinese brand. The recognizing of Chinese brand's cultural archetype in this paper has constituted the basis of Chinese brand's cultural archetype strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Grounded Theory, this paper has collected and analyzed the value symbols, character images and theme stories of Chinese narrative advertisements and constructed the cultural archetype framework of Chinese brands. This paper makes a comprehensive application of Charmaz's constructivist analysis and the main axis analysis and inspection method advocated by Strauss, with the aim of building a more objective and systematic theoretical framework for the Chinese brand cultural archetype.

Findings

In this framework, it revealed: (1) Chinese brand's cultural archetype can be divided into 12 concrete archetypes according to individual's relationship with self, the other, community and nature; (2) Consumers' different ways of self-categorization are attributed as the essential difference among various archetypes. This paper also compared and analyzed the differences between Chinese and Western cultural archetypes from three perspectives, formation of social structure, pedigree of myth and character's feature.

Originality/value

This paper has certain innovative significance to the theoretical construction of the archetype of Chinese brand culture. First, based on the cultural perspective, this paper applied the cultural psychological connotation of archetype to the brand research across culture, which is more conducive to the researchers' investigation of the cultural psychology of consumers in the cross-cultural context? Second, based on the identification and comparative study of Chinese brand culture archetype, it provides a new expansion and supplement for the research on brand internationalization and globalization in emerging countries.

Details

Journal of Contemporary Marketing Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7480

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2015

Jinzhao Lu and Yingjiao Xu

This study aims to investigate Chinese young consumers’ brand loyalty toward sportswear products from a self-congruity perspective. With different performance observed…

6390

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate Chinese young consumers’ brand loyalty toward sportswear products from a self-congruity perspective. With different performance observed between global and domestic sportswear brands in the Chinese market, this study also aims to examine the impact of country of origin on Chinese young consumers’ behavior toward sportswear brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with street intercept method was conducted in Shanghai to collect data for this study. Multiple independent t-tests and structural equation modeling (SEM) with bootstrap method were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The SEM results indicate a significant influence of brand self-congruity on consumers’ brand association and perceived quality, which, in turn, influenced consumers’ brand loyalty. The multiple t-test results suggest a significant difference between Chinese and global sportswear brands in terms of consumers’ brand association and attitudinal brand loyalty. No significant difference was found in terms of consumers’ behavioral brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study comes from the convenience student sample.

Practical implications

First, brands need to strategically design the brand image to represent the largest segment of the target market. Second, while global brands could focus on their pricing strategies, domestic brands need to focus more on maintaining a positive brand association in consumers’ mind.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the self-congruity perspective of brand loyalty by empirically confirming the indirect effect of brand self-congruity on brand loyalty via the mediation effects of brand association and perceived quality in the context of the ever-growing Chinese sportswear market.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Ting Jin, Wei Shao, Deborah Griffin and Mitchell Ross

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method is used including focus groups and in-depth personal interviews with young Chinese consumers who are currently living and working in Australia.

Findings

Two key findings emerge from the results, namely, young Chinese consumers attach symbolic values to Chinese brands and Chinese brands are perceived positively by young Chinese consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that symbolic values (such as pride, lifestyle, feeling of home and being happy) constitute one of the primary motivations for young Chinese consumers’ purchase of domestic brands. The results of this study challenge the traditional view that Chinese brands are perceived negatively in the Chinese market.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few studies investigating how young Chinese consumers perceive brands from their home country rather than foreign brands.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Jiaxun He

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the key dimensions reflecting the differences between Chinese and foreign brands, evaluate different consumption generations, and…

920

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the key dimensions reflecting the differences between Chinese and foreign brands, evaluate different consumption generations, and provide evidence for studying differences and similarities of brand personality dimensions from a cross‐cultural perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire survey among a large sample of people in three cities of China, brand personality of Chinese and foreign brands was measured by an indigenous scale. Principal component analysis and nonparametric tests were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Two key dimensions of humanity and trendiness were found and compared with Aaker's scale. Differences in dimensions of brand personality were also identified through comparing foreign brands with local brands as well as consumption by the younger and older generations. In conclusion, China's local brands show a higher level of humanity but a lower level of trendiness. The young generation has significantly higher demands for trendiness than the old generation.

Research limitations/implications

In order to test the robustness of the conclusions of this paper, a more popular interval variable type is needed for further study. In addition, the conclusions drawn from this may not be completely suitable for other industries or categories.

Practical implications

The results have some important implications for building the image of China's local brands, especially time‐honored brands. The key approach is to create a trendiness association while keeping points of difference association on humanity.

Originality/value

Previous research has demonstrated cross‐cultural differences and similarities in the evaluations of brand personality, but there are no studies in the context of the Chinese market. The findings of this paper support the argument that the key dimensions of brand personality exist across different cultures.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2009

Ilan Alon, Romie F. Littrell and Allan K.K. Chan

This article reviews and discusses issues in the translation of international brand names to Chinese, and provides a framework for international brand managers who want to…

2011

Abstract

This article reviews and discusses issues in the translation of international brand names to Chinese, and provides a framework for international brand managers who want to expand into China. Linguistic differences between Chinese and English are wide and deep, making translation of brand names difficult. Cultural context, pronunciation, written vs. oral language, and the meaning of characters are just a few examples of such difficulties. We discuss four global product‐naming strategic alternatives available to country/brand managers, along with their usage. The four approaches include (1) dual extension, (2) brand meaning extension, (3) brand feeling extension, and (4) dual adaptation. We also provide examples of brands utilizing the different approaches.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Francis R. Ille

The purpose of this paper is to examine the different strategies implemented by a number of successful Chinese firms currently striving to build global brands in order to…

4840

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the different strategies implemented by a number of successful Chinese firms currently striving to build global brands in order to improve their export capabilities. A particular emphasis is put on the transfer of marketing technology for brand engineering in order to achieve this goal.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis uses case study methodology to understand what many prominent Chinese exporting firms have achieved, and develops a theory about their general strategy. Five firms have been chosen: Lenovo, Haier, Cosco, Tsingtao, Geely. Aside from these five, information is also given on the branding strategy of Li Ning and Suntech Power. A great part of the information collected is coming from “desk research”, except for Haier, Lenovo and Tsingtao for which personal contacts and visits took place in 2005 and 2006.

Findings

The findings suggest that some of the most successful Chinese firms in the field of development of brand image either use some marketing tools, such as increasing their communication spending, improving quality control, emphasizing their corporate social responsibility visibility, or by seeking a partnership through mergers/acquisition with successful foreign brands. A basic global branding model has been defined as consistent with Chinese firms’ experience.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to seven firms to be considered among the most successful Chinese businesses. It does not intend to be perceived as statistically representative. The period of observation of the effect of the strategy which was implemented was short and during a time of booming Chinese economy. It was impossible to isolate the extraneous variables linked to the economic or competitive situation, knowing that they could affect the observations on the firms that were studied.

Originality/value

Though the entry strategies on the Chinese market as well as inbound foreign direct investments have been the object of a great number of publications, the outbound strategies of Chinese exporting firms, as well as the impact of technology transfer, has been covered less frequently. Therefore, this paper can have value for candidates for the improvement of global branding.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Ying Fan

To examine the state of health of branding in China, focusing on the performance of major Chinese enterprises in creating brands (as distinct from brand names), sustaining…

15061

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the state of health of branding in China, focusing on the performance of major Chinese enterprises in creating brands (as distinct from brand names), sustaining them in the huge domestic market and expand them into global markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study begins with a historical review of the development of marketing in China, discusses the transition from price competition to branding in the domestic market, and explains the role of government in the process. Thereafter, case histories describe, analyse and discuss the routes to internationalisation followed by taken by six of China's biggest brands.

Findings

Modern Chinese companies are large and successful as manufacturers, but uncertain about the relative merits of branding and global marketing versus continuation as OEMs for established global brands. If they do have international ambitions, they seem unsure about strategy, or even about where to look for precedents and advice. Many initiatives have met with comparative failure; only one, the Lemovo‐IBM merger, seems to offer a blueprint for success, but has been in operation only since 2005. Many lessons remain to be learnt, applied and tested.

Research limitations/implications

Six case histories, however well chosen, cannot be considered a definitive picture of the Chinese approach to international brand marketing. The findings are nevertheless highly indicative.

Practical implications

International marketing strategists are obliged to have an interest in China, by virtue of the simple fact of its size and dynamism. Several of the companies discussed are the largest of their kind in the world. Despite the limitations noted, the actual and potential conclusions to be drawn from the findings reported here are therefore a significant contribution to the body of applicable knowledge.

Originality/value

Whereas many authors have studied Western brands in China, little has been known about the potential of Chinese brands in the West.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Yi‐Long Jaw, Ru‐Yu Wang and Carol Ying‐Yu Hsu

Although the concept of branding has been considered extensively in products and services, branding in Chinese is a relatively emerging phenomenon. This paper aims to…

1491

Abstract

Purpose

Although the concept of branding has been considered extensively in products and services, branding in Chinese is a relatively emerging phenomenon. This paper aims to present the enlivenment of branding in Chinese within the cross‐strait markets of Taiwan and Mainland China, which underlies various ideologies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study primarily reviews literatures of brand and brand name translation, defines the essentiality of brand naming, and outlines the branding strategies for entering cross‐strait markets. Furthermore, this study validates the using of substantially interpreted brands that support the authors' four developed propositions.

Findings

This study compares substantially interpreted brands in cross‐strait markets with a reference to commonly used translation methods. The results illustrate interesting ideologies among cross‐strait markets and can help managers achieve global brand recognition.

Research limitations/implications

Since China and Taiwan share the same Chinese culture, the qualitative method proposed by the present authors is more applicable to practitioners who are eager to pursue branding in cross‐strait markets. Thus, the relevant techniques may not be applicable to people less familiar with Chinese culture.

Practical implications

The qualitative case study provides an advisable method for branding in Chinese. The results of this study can provide greater understanding of the various ideologies in cross‐strait markets, as well as help managers achieve global brand recognition.

Originality/value

The various ideologies from branding is complex, especially for those involved with linguistic essentials. Previous research has mainly focused on managerial‐based branding and customer‐based branding. This paper extends the interest into enlivening inspirations.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 15000