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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2022

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Kamal Badar, Muhammad Sarfraz and Naeem Ashraf

Drawing on the social exchange theory, this study aims to examine the association between interpersonal conflict and task performance as well as the mediating and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social exchange theory, this study aims to examine the association between interpersonal conflict and task performance as well as the mediating and moderating roles of workplace deviance and emotional intelligence, respectively, in this association.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were designed to test the authors’ hypotheses using multiwave and multisource data collected from 173 (187) subordinates and their immediate supervisors from Pakistan.

Findings

An important reason that interpersonal conflict diminishes employees’ task performance is that employees are engaged in workplace deviance. This indirect effect is less salient when employees are more emotionally intelligent.

Practical implications

One way to improve employees’ task performance could be to reduce and manage interpersonal conflicts, especially through interventions aimed at increasing employees’ emotional intelligence levels.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature by demonstrating that employees’ emotional intelligence is a boundary condition that alters the association between interpersonal conflict and employee task performance directly and indirectly via workplace deviance.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Mohammed Aboramadan, Eissa M.I. Elhamalawi and Subhan Shahid

Given the importance of employee psychological well-being to job performance, this study aims to investigate the mediating role of affective commitment between…

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Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of employee psychological well-being to job performance, this study aims to investigate the mediating role of affective commitment between psychological well-being and job performance while considering the moderating role of job insecurity on psychological well-being and affective commitment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered from employees working in cellular companies of Pakistan using paper-and-pencil surveys. A total of 280 responses were received. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling technique and Hayes’s Model 1.

Findings

Findings suggest that affective commitment mediates the association between psychological well-being (hedonic and eudaimonic) and employee job performance. In addition, perceived job insecurity buffers the association of psychological well-being (hedonic and eudaimonic) and affective commitment.

Practical implications

The study results suggest that fostering employee psychological well-being may be advantageous for the organization. However, if interventions aimed at ensuring job security are not made, it may result in adverse employee work-related attitudes and behaviors.

Originality/value

The study extends the current literature on employee well-being in two ways. First, by examining psychological well-being in terms of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being with employee work-related attitude and behavior. Second, by highlighting the prominent role played by perceived job insecurity in explaining some of these relationships.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Mohammed Aboramadan and Yasir Mansoor Kundi

Drawing upon theories of conservation of resources (COR), broaden-and-build (BnB), self-determination, and the job demands- resources (JD-R) model, this study uniquely…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon theories of conservation of resources (COR), broaden-and-build (BnB), self-determination, and the job demands- resources (JD-R) model, this study uniquely tries to understand the mechanisms that contribute to happiness at work by proposing a model of the effects of emotional culture of joy on happiness at work, where psychological safety and relational attachments serve as intervening mechanisms among the aforesaid relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-wave time-lagged study with 340 employees from Pakistani organizations was conducted. Data were analyzed using covariance-based structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate that emotional culture of joy significantly predicts happiness at work. Furthermore, emotional culture of joy significantly and positively influences both psychological safety and relational attachment. Finally, the relationship between emotional culture of joy and happiness at work is found to be mediated by both relational attachment and psychological safety.

Practical implications

The results are of utmost importance as they provide insights to policy makers and organizations administrators on the value of emotional culture of joy and its contribution to employees’ wellbeing, and indeed its role in fostering important psychological and emotional resources such as psychological safety and relational attachment.

Originality/value

This study is unique for the following reasons. First, it addresses and bridges a gap pertaining to the drivers of happiness at work. Second, this is the first study that considers emotional culture of joy as an antecedent to happiness at work. Third, the employment of both psychological safety and relational attachment as intervening mechanisms in the relationship between emotional culture of joy and happiness at work has not been previously addressed in the management and wellbeing literature. Finally, the study shifts direction from studying organizational drivers (i.e. HR, organization support, etc.) of happiness at work to the examination of psychological and emotional resources that may influence happiness at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2022

Mohammed Aboramadan, Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Eissa Elhamalawy and Belal Albashiti

Building on the social exchange theory and the norm of reciprocity, this study examines the effect of high-performance work systems (HPWS) during the COVID-19 pandemic on…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the social exchange theory and the norm of reciprocity, this study examines the effect of high-performance work systems (HPWS) during the COVID-19 pandemic on employee's risk-taking behavior and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Among the aforementioned links, perceived safety climate was theorized as a mediating mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Multisource and time-lagged data were gathered from a sample of employees and their supervisors working in Palestinian nonprofit organizations.

Findings

HPWS were shown to boost risk-taking behavior during COVID-19 pandemic. The direct effect between HPWS and OCB was not significant. Furthermore, safety climate mediated the effect of HPWS on both risk-taking behavior and OCB.

Practical implications

The study's findings can be used by managers with regard to the utility of HPWS during times of crises and their impact on important behavioral outcomes.

Originality/value

HRM scholars have started to look at how HR practices can be useful in helping to overcome a pandemic. However, limited empirical knowledge is available on the effects of HPWS on employees' work outcomes during crises. The study is aimed at addressing the aforementioned gap.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Mohammed Aboramadan, Yasir Mansoor Kundi and Annika Becker

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management…

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Abstract

Purpose

Building on the theories of social exchange and organizational support, this study proposes a research model to investigate the impact of green human resources management (GHRM) on nonprofit employees' green work-related outcomes, namely green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. In the model, perceived green organizational support (PGOS) is theorized and employed as an intervening mechanism between the examined linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two different waves from 408 employees working in the Palestinian nonprofit sector. Covariance based-structural equation modeling was used to validate the study's research model and to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that GHRM is positively associated with green voice behavior, green knowledge-sharing behavior and green helping behavior. Moreover, the results show that PGOS exhibits a significant mediation effect between the aforesaid links. This study thus provides initial empirical evidence in the field of GHRM, with particular focus on the nonprofit sector.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a roadmap to nonprofit managers and practitioners on how GHRM can encourage employees to speak up, share information and help others in the environmental and green domain. By supporting nonprofit managers strengthening green employee behavior, it provides an additional source to fostering intrinsically motivated behaviors in the workplace.

Originality/value

In response to urgent environmental threats, this study contributes to green and sustainable management research with a focus on GHRM, thereby providing initial empirical research from a nonprofit perspective.

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Sandrine Hollet-Haudebert and Jonathan Peterson

Using career construction theory, the authors empirically examine the mechanism by which career adaptability promotes employee subjective career success (career…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using career construction theory, the authors empirically examine the mechanism by which career adaptability promotes employee subjective career success (career satisfaction and career commitment) through job crafting.

Design/methodology/approach

A moderated mediation model is tested using survey data from 324 full-time business professionals in France. Hypotheses are tested using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

he authors found that job crafting mediated the relationship between career adaptability and subjective career success (career satisfaction and career commitment). The positive effect of career adaptability on job crafting was greater under higher levels of lone wolf personality and positive perfectionism, as was the indirect effect of career adaptability on subjective career success via job crafting.

Research limitations/implications

data are cross-sectional in nature. Robust theoretical contentions and affective means of identifying common method variance (CMV) are addressed and evaluated.

Practical implications

High levels of career adaptability may be a useful strategy for promoting employee job crafting and subjective career success. In addition, individuals with lone wolf personality and positive perfectionism should be given opportunities to craft their jobs in the workplace.

Originality/value

This research confirms a moderated mediation model positioning job crafting as a mediator of career adaptability's effects on employee subjective career success and lone wolf and positive perfectionism as moderators of such effects. This study suggests that job crafting and career-focused personality traits are important factors that influence the relationship between career adaptability and subjective career success.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Subhan Shahid and Yasir Mansoor Kundi

This study investigates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and entrepreneurial exit, particularly how this relationship might be invigorated by two critical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and entrepreneurial exit, particularly how this relationship might be invigorated by two critical psychological factors, namely cognitive well-being (CWB) and affective well-being (AWB).

Design/methodology/approach

Binary logistic regression analysis was employed on a longitudinal data set of 997 self-employed individuals taken from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) during years 2012-2013.

Findings

Greater level of emotional exhaustion increases the likelihood of entrepreneurial exit. However, individuals with higher levels of affective or/and cognitive well-being are less likely to engage in the actual entrepreneurial exit behaviors.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurial exit is one of the crucial managerial decisions made by entrepreneurs. The decision to quit is not only triggered by poor firm performance but also by various psychological factors. The authors found subjective well-being as an essential mechanism promoting entrepreneurs’ overall well-being, thus recommending that entrepreneurs psychologically distance themselves from work during off times.

Originality/value

First, the study discovered emotional exhaustion as a crucial psychological precursor of entrepreneurial exit by focusing on actual exit instances rather than intentions and strategies to exit. That contributes to understanding the psychological mechanism involved in resource gain and loss while making exit decisions. Second, affective and cognitive well-being are found to be two crucial enablers that work as a recovery process to deal with emotional exhaustion.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Subhan Shahid, Annika Becker and Yasir Mansoor Kundi

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to untangle the underlying mechanisms through which reputational signals promote stakeholders' intentions to donate in nonprofit organizations via stakeholder trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a moderated mediation model using an experimental design with N = 248 business and public management students of France.

Findings

The results indicate that both a formal reputational signal (third-party certificate) and an informal reputational signal (self-proclaiming to be social entrepreneurial) affect stakeholder trust and intentions to donate. Stakeholder trust partially mediated the relationship between the formal signal and intentions to donate, and the mediation effect was stronger when an informal signal was present (vs. not present).

Practical implications

Trust is central to the exchange of nonprofit organizations and their external stakeholders. To enhance trust and supportive behavior toward nonprofit organizations, these organizations may consider using formal and informal reputational signaling within their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This research highlights the pivotal role of formal and informal reputational signals for the enhancing stakeholders' trust and donation behavior in a nonprofit context.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Shuaib Ahmed Soomro and Muhammad Kamran

Drawing on Kahn’s model of meaningful connections, this study aims to examine relational attachment as a mediating mechanism linking social support in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on Kahn’s model of meaningful connections, this study aims to examine relational attachment as a mediating mechanism linking social support in terms of instrumental support and personal support to employees’ subjective career success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in 2 waves from 247 employees working in Poland. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling in AMOS.

Findings

The findings indicated that employees are more attached to and satisfied with their careers when they have a stronger relational attachment to others at work. Furthermore, relational attachment was found to be driven by tangible or intangible instrumental support received at work rather than the personal support received at work.

Practical implications

Managers should recognize the importance of workplace relationships and social support, which can lead to higher career commitment and career satisfaction. However, managers should keep in mind that too much interference in individuals’ privacy and providing too much personal support may lead to adverse outcomes.

Originality/value

The present study expands the scant literature on the mediating role of relational attachment at work between social support received at work and subjective career success.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Yasir Mansoor Kundi, Shakir Sardar and Kamal Badar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of threat and challenge appraisals in the relationship between performance pressure and employees' work…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of threat and challenge appraisals in the relationship between performance pressure and employees' work engagement, as well as the buffering role of emotional stability, as a personal characteristic, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a three-wave research design. Hypotheses were examined with a sample of 247 white-collar employees from French organizations.

Findings

Performance pressure is appraised as either threat or challenge. Challenge appraisal positively mediated the performance pressure and work engagement relationship, whereas threat appraisal negatively mediated the performance pressure and work engagement relationship. Emotional stability moderated these effects, suggesting performance pressure was appraised as a challenge rather than a threat, which then enhanced employee work engagement.

Practical implications

This study has shown that employees with high emotional stability who perceived performance pressure as a challenge achieved stronger employee work engagement.

Originality/value

Building on Lazare's theory of stress and Mitchell et al. 's theorization, this research demonstrates mediating and moderating mechanisms driving the role of performance pressure on employee work engagement relationships.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13