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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Lee Di Milia and Zhou Jiang

The authors tested (1) the mediating role of thriving in the association between leader-member exchange (LMX) and work–nonwork balance (WNWB) and (2) the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors tested (1) the mediating role of thriving in the association between leader-member exchange (LMX) and work–nonwork balance (WNWB) and (2) the moderating effect of gender in the relationship between LMX and thriving.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected from six separate participant groups across an eight-month period (n = 522). Data analysis included confirmatory factor analysis to assess the construct validity of the proposed three-factor model. Hierarchical regression and the PROCESS macro were used to test three hypotheses.

Findings

The authors found thriving mediated an indirect effect of LMX on WNWB. In addition, we found that the relationship between LMX and thriving was moderated by gender, such that the relationship was found for females. Overall, the authors identified a moderated-mediation effect indicating an indirect effect of LMX on WNWB via thriving for females.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional design suggests their results are theory driven. The authors suggest future studies replicate the study employing experimental designs.

Practical implications

The authors suggest organisations develop programs to enhance leadership and thriving capabilities as tools to manage WNWB.

Originality/value

The authors add to the thriving literature by revealing gender differences in the effectiveness of relational resources (i.e. LMX) in fostering employee thriving. Furthermore, the authors extend the efficacy of thriving beyond the workplace to include WNWB. The authors demonstrate the skills and knowledge acquired at work can be used to lessen the impact of WNWB.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2017

Victoria Choi Yue Woo, Richard J. Boland and David L. Cooperrider

As they say, “Change is the only constant.” Thriving and surviving during a period of extraordinary collision of technological advances, globalization, and climate change…

Abstract

As they say, “Change is the only constant.” Thriving and surviving during a period of extraordinary collision of technological advances, globalization, and climate change can be daunting. At any given point in one’s life, a transition can be interpreted in terms of the magnitude of change (how big or small) and the individual’s ontological experience of change (whether it disrupts an equilibrium or adapts an emergent way of life). These four quadrants represent different ways to live in a highly dynamic and complex world. We share the resulting four-quadrant framework from a quantitative and a mixed methods study to examine responses to various ways we respond to transitions. Contingent upon these two dimensions, one can use a four-quadrant framework to mobilize resources to design a response and hypothesize a desired outcome. Individuals may find themselves at various junctions of these quadrants over a lifespan. These four quadrants provide “requisite variety” to navigate individual ontology as they move into and out of fluid spaces we often call instability during a time of transition. In this chapter, we identified social, cognitive, psychological, and behavioral factors that contribute to thriving transition experiences, embracing dynamic stability. Two new constructs were developed, the first measures the receptivity to change, Transformation Quotient (TQ) and second measures the range of responses to transitions from surviving to thriving, Thriving Transitional Experiences (TTE). We hope our work will pave the way for Thriving to become a “normal” outcome of experiencing change by transforming the lexicon and expectation of engaging with transitions.

Details

Human Capital and Assets in the Networked World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-828-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Norberth Okros and Delia Virga

Based on the socially embedded model of thriving at work and using the conservation of resources and job demands-resources theories, this study aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the socially embedded model of thriving at work and using the conservation of resources and job demands-resources theories, this study aims to examine the mediating role of thriving at work, as a personal resource, in the relationship between workplace safety, as job resource, and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used structural equation modeling to test the mediation model on a sample of 350 correctional officers.

Findings

The results provided support to the authors' model. The authors found that workplace safety is positively linked to job satisfaction and negatively to health complaints, and these relationships are partially mediated by thriving at work. Consistent with the conservation of resources theory, thriving at the workplace is a mechanism that translates the positive effect of workplace safety on well-being.

Originality/value

The contribution of this research resides that a safe work environment leads to improved health and job satisfaction via thriving at work because thriving correctional officers feel energetic and able to acquire and apply knowledge and skills at workplace.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 July 2016

Mahima Thakur, Anjali Bansal and Peter Stokes

This empirical investigation studies the correlates and predictors of employees’ psychological outcomes during mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the context of India…

Abstract

This empirical investigation studies the correlates and predictors of employees’ psychological outcomes during mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the context of India. This study examined the role of different types of training initiatives (awareness training, human capital development training, and cross-cultural training) on building employees feeling of psychological empowerment and thriving. Further, second-order attitudes were studied in the form of employee satisfaction and commitment. A cross-sectional research design was adopted where quantitative and qualitative data were collected to investigate the interplay between the variables. Data were collected on an adapted standardized questionnaire from the employees of a public sector organization (N = 117) which had merged with a software company to deliver its IT services. Descriptive analysis, multiple correlational analysis, and stepwise regression analysis have assisted in exploring the different relationships amongst the variables. This study produces a prescriptive framework for merger success based on the model of growth and thriving (Spreitzer & Porath, 2012). Broadly, the results point towards the facilitative role of training in developing feelings of psychological empowerment, thriving, commitment and satisfaction with the merger, however qualitative data identified significant cultural undercurrents.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-394-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Rachael L. Narel, Therese Yaeger and Peter F. Sorensen

The environment in which businesses operate today is uncertain, chaotic, and changing at a more rapid pace than ever before. In this new dynamic world, current approaches…

Abstract

The environment in which businesses operate today is uncertain, chaotic, and changing at a more rapid pace than ever before. In this new dynamic world, current approaches to organizational design and processes are not as effective as they have been. Recent research has provided insight into organizational agility as a method to help organizations survive and thrive in these environments. A divergent body of literature is presented that explores agility, learning, and thriving. An exploratory mixed-methods study was conducted at the team level to examine the relationship between these constructs as well as their relationship to performance. Based on the results, we present a series of propositions for future research and provide an illustration of the Components of Agile and Thriving teams to be used as its foundation. The discussion serves to synthesize these initial findings and provide both implications for practice as well as theory.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-554-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Angela C. C. Keister

Organizational agility is becoming a critical component of organization development and change due to the increasingly continuous and iterative nature of change. This…

Abstract

Organizational agility is becoming a critical component of organization development and change due to the increasingly continuous and iterative nature of change. This explanatory mixed methods study demonstrates the effect of collective thriving on change agility and positions collective thriving as a psychological state that contributes to organization agility. Attunement is hypothesized to be a point of leverage to increase the state of collective thriving and was found to moderate the relationship between collective thriving and change agility. The qualitative study investigates characteristics of high- and low-thriving teams and furthers the understanding of collective thriving and change agility.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Angela J. Xu, Ting Ting Zhu, Raymond Loi and Cheris W.C. Chow

Drawing on and extending the socially embedded model of thriving, this paper aims to investigate how and when customer participation promotes hospitality frontline…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on and extending the socially embedded model of thriving, this paper aims to investigate how and when customer participation promotes hospitality frontline employees’ engagement in extra-role service behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-wave questionnaire survey was carried out among frontline service employees and their immediate supervisors in a four-star business hotel in Eastern China. Path analysis using Mplus 8.3 examined a multilevel moderated mediation model.

Findings

Customer participation has a positive effect on frontline employees’ experience of thriving, which in turn promotes their engagement in extra-role service behavior. Nevertheless, supervisors’ negative affect weakens the positive effect of customer participation.

Practical implications

Hotels could implement employee assistance programs, arrange training on emotional regulation and positive psychology and create a fun work environment to help alleviate supervisors’ experience of negative affect so as to lessen its adverse effect on frontline employees’ perception of customer participation.

Originality/value

First, this work is one of the few studies exploring how customer participation affects frontline employees’ well-being (in terms of thriving) and extra-role service behavior, which advances extant value co-creation literature. Second, the moderating role of supervisors’ negative affect enriches the limited understanding of when customer participation might not bring firm benefits. Third, by uncovering customer participation as an antecedent of employee thriving, this study extends thriving research that only attends to contexts located within organizations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2022

Xiongying Niu, Baofang Zhang, Mulele Simasiku and Rui Zhang

This study aims to explore the effect of expatriate supervisors’ managerial coaching behavior on local subordinates’ learning effects through the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the effect of expatriate supervisors’ managerial coaching behavior on local subordinates’ learning effects through the mediating role of subordinates’ thriving at work under the boundary condition of expatriate supervisors’ cultural intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected the data form 230 Zambian subordinates and their immediate expatriate supervisors working in the Chinese company in Zambia. Regression analyses and bootstrapping analyses were used to test the authors’ hypothesis.

Findings

The results indicated that expatriate supervisors’ managerial coaching behavior was positively related to local subordinates’ learning effects. In addition, the study also found that local subordinates’ thriving at work mediated the linkage between managerial coaching behavior and learning effects. And expatriate supervisors’ cultural intelligence moderated the indirect relationship between managerial coaching behavior and learning effects via thriving at work, such that the indirect effect was stronger for expatriate supervisors with high rather than low cultural intelligence.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a better understanding of how expatriate supervisors’ managerial coaching behavior influences local subordinates’ learning effects by investigating the mediating effect of thriving at work on the managerial coaching behavior–learning effects link. In addition, the study deepens the understanding of the boundary condition of the associations between managerial coaching behavior and subordinates’ learning effects in a cross-cultural context by investigating the moderating effect of expatriate supervisors’ cultural intelligence.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Soebin Jang, Sangok Yoo, Jin Lee and Yunsoo Lee

Drawing on the socially embedded model of thriving at work, this study aims to test a moderated mediation model to elucidate the mediating effect of work meaningfulness…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the socially embedded model of thriving at work, this study aims to test a moderated mediation model to elucidate the mediating effect of work meaningfulness and the moderating role of perceived interpersonal justice on the relationship between servant leadership and thriving at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 221 employees from the manufacturing industry in South Korea, a series of hierarchical regression analyses were conducted by using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) software. For conducting moderated mediation analysis, the PROCESS macro for SPSS was utilized.

Findings

The findings show that servant leadership significantly relates to thriving at work, and work meaningfulness and perceived interpersonal justice act as a mediating mechanism and a boundary condition, respectively. Based on moderated mediation analysis, the collective effect of servant leadership, work meaningfulness and perceived interpersonal justice on thriving at work were also confirmed.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that organizations should adopt servant leadership to promote employee thriving at work. In doing so, it is important to ensure that employees experience work meaningfulness, and are treated with respect and dignity.

Originality/value

This study extends research on servant leadership, and sheds light on important mechanisms and boundary conditions under which servant leadership promotes thriving at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

H.M. Saidur Rahaman

Until recently, scholars have begun to examine the contextual antecedents of employees thriving at work. A recent study has shown that one aspect of organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

Until recently, scholars have begun to examine the contextual antecedents of employees thriving at work. A recent study has shown that one aspect of organizational structure/context (i.e. formalization) can be an important antecedent of employee thriving at work. However, scholars have urged doing research examining how different aspects of organizational structure can combinedly influence employee work outcomes such as thriving at work. Given that, the present paper proposes a theoretical model to unravel the mechanisms of how two aspects of organizational structure (i.e. formalization and centralization) may operate as the antecedents of employees thriving at work. In particular, the author draws on the Conservation of Resources Theory (COR) to hypothesize that employees' work engagement mediates the relationship between their perception of formalization and thriving at work. The author further hypothesizes that the indirect relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work is moderated by employees' perception of centralization, such that the relationship is stronger in the presence of a lower level of centralization than higher.

Design/methodology/approach

The author gathered data by employing a time-lagged survey design involving 136 full-time employees from different organizations.

Findings

Results show that employee work engagement mediates the relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work. Further, the indirect relationship between formalization and employee thriving at work is stronger when the level of centralization is relatively low.

Research limitations/implications

Formalization is able to enact employees' thriving at work, particularly when organization implements relatively less centralized structure.

Originality/value

This study first introduces work engagement as a mediator in the formalization–employee thriving at work relationship and centralization as a moderator along this mediating process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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