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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Donald Getz and Graham Brown

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A regional case study was undertaken, including data from a survey of 23 wineries in Canada's Okanagan Valley, British Columbia. The survey provides the winery perspective on development of wine tourism, as well as opinions on what should be done to improve wine tourism.

Findings

Wineries were found to be pursuing tourism developments, but kept little data on visitors and related spending. Their goals and opinions on what is needed in the region revealed that they are mostly oriented toward domestic, independent travelers. One hypothesis emerging from this case study is that the growth and increasing sophistication of wine tourism infrastructure, both at wineries and elsewhere in the region, is in large part a function of market potential. On the supply‐side, a critical mass can be facilitated through establishment of major, landmark wineries that are purpose‐built as tourist attractions.

Practical implications

Using this profile of the Okanagan, implications are drawn for comparisons and benchmarking among wine tourism destinations, including a suggested process and measures.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study limits generalizability to other destinations, and the achieved sample of wineries does not necessarily reflect the major corporate wineries in the Okanagan Valley. More systematic comparison of wine regions is recommended.

Originality/value

This research makes an original contribution for applying the concept and method of benchmarking to wine tourism destinations. It is of value to the wine industry, destination marketers, and host community planners.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

G. Page West III and Ian M Taplin

Most research on new organizations drawing on resource-based theory examines firms in discrete development stages with resources that already exist. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Most research on new organizations drawing on resource-based theory examines firms in discrete development stages with resources that already exist. The purpose of this paper is to articulate a broader view of changing resource requirements over the life of new organizations. The authors propose four phases of resources development, arguing that new resources and capabilities must develop as new strategic challenges emerge. The paper identifies salient resources in these phases and finds that internal resource development is context dependent, interacting with the external stage of industry development.

Design/methodology/approach

After developing the theoretical model, the authors use an exploratory qualitative study involving extensive case studies of new ventures in the wine industry. Key personnel at a sample of firms were interviewed, supplemented with secondary data from published reports.

Findings

The paper finds that a linear stage development model for new organizational ventures is inappropriate. The various combinations of early/later new ventures in a formative/developed industry suggest that some may proceed rapidly in a linear fashion through phases of development, while others may find progress slow, difficult, stalled or occasionally regressive. A combination of resources developed simultaneously in a non-linear pattern appears to be critical to the success of new ventures. In other words, combinations must evolve as the strategic challenges evolve, thus bringing an important contextual view to the examination of dynamic resource development efforts for new organizations. Attempts to focus in a piecemeal fashion on individual aspects of resource development, without accounting for resource interactions at a systemic level or the nature of the strategic demands, is likely to leave researchers and practitioners with incomplete insights.

Originality/value

Existing studies have failed to grasp the dynamic and interactive process of resource development as organizations evolve in a new industry setting. The model presented in this paper provides a heuristic device for conceptualizing these changes.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Abel Duarte Alonso

Muscadines grapes, the fruit of a vine native to the South East of the USA have been studied extensively, including their alleged beneficial health properties. To date…

Abstract

Purpose

Muscadines grapes, the fruit of a vine native to the South East of the USA have been studied extensively, including their alleged beneficial health properties. To date, however, very little is known about the business side of muscadine growing. For instance, very limited information exists on whether wineries growing muscadines are currently processing their grapes into other value‐added products. The present study seeks to explore these aspects from winery operators' points‐of‐view.

Design/methodology/approach

Telephone interviews, coupled with two face‐to‐face on‐site interviews were conducted among 31 winery owners located in different states in the South East of the USA.

Findings

Overall, winery operators acknowledge the potential for the diversification and development of muscadine value‐added products, including juice, jellies, fortified wines or those for pharmaceutical purposes. However, the limited supply of muscadine grapes or muscadine juice to satisfy demand for value‐added products is an area of concern that several muscadine growers acknowledged. Also of concern are laws and regulations that are preventing winery operators from capitalizing on some muscadine products with alcohol content.

Research limitations/implications

The low number of participants in comparison with the much larger number of existing muscadine wineries limits the generalisability of the findings.

Practical implications

With potentially greater demand for muscadine‐related products in the future, industry support and the development of new initiatives are needed to facilitate the process of value‐added muscadine product development for the benefit of operators, the industry and consumers.

Originality/value

The study focuses on the business‐side of muscadine production, an area that to a great extent has been neglected in contemporary research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Mercedes Marzo-Navarro and Marta Pedraja-Iglesias

The purpose of this paper is to define and analyse not only the main categories of online marketing strategies used by Rioja wine producers but also how wineries use their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and analyse not only the main categories of online marketing strategies used by Rioja wine producers but also how wineries use their websites to provide information about wine tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of websites corresponding to the Rioja designation of origin (Spain) is analysed, and the types of websites are determined according to significant differences in their content.

Findings

The websites used by Rioja wineries can be improved. The elements developed the best are those related to contact information and interactive communication, although interactive communication can also be enhanced through properly managed social networks. The study concludes that the websites can be further improved by including more information about the wines of the wineries, by improving their e-commerce platforms and interactivity and by including more information about other companies at the wine tourism destination. Two distinct types of websites were observed, differentiated by greater or lesser orientation towards the development of the region as a wine tourism destination.

Research limitations/implications

This study should be conducted for other designations of origin, both national and international, thereby allowing a comparison of not only the elements that are present on websites but also their orientation.

Practical implications

An outline is provided regarding the information that a winery's website must have to generate interest in a region as a wine tourism destination. The indicators that must be developed for a region to be tourism oriented are shown.

Social implications

The study highlights the importance of including wine tourism information on websites to improve social cohesion among wine tourism players and to contribute to both a stronger wine tourism identity and improved economic outcomes.

Originality/value

The proposed scheme is a diagnostic tool that allows determining the areas of improvement of one of the main sources of information used by tourists when selecting a destination. This tool can be applied by any winery regardless of its location.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Nicholas C. Williamson and Joy Bhadury

The purpose of this empirical research is to identify the distinguishing operating characteristics of wineries that use what is alleged to be the most profitable channel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this empirical research is to identify the distinguishing operating characteristics of wineries that use what is alleged to be the most profitable channel of distribution for marketing wine in the USA: the wine club.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design entails the contrasting of the Web site-reflected operating features of wineries that support wine clubs with wineries that do not.

Findings

Support was found for the great majority of operating features identified in the literature as likely characterizing the operations of wineries with wine clubs. A notable exception concerns the lack of confirmation of hypotheses concerning “Wine 2.0” variables.

Research limitations/implications

In the apparent pursuit of higher profits, owners and managers of wineries with wine clubs more frequently adopt operating features that expose them to objective competitive comparisons than do owners and managers with other wineries. The former are also more prone to advertise on their Web sites a variety of offers that collectively constitute a more valuable quid pro quo in their relationships with consumer buyers than appears to be the case with other wineries. Strategically, results demonstrate that a winery’s adoption of a wine club is not a part of an evolutionary process of wineries in general.

Originality/value

There has been no other published empirical research that concerned the identification of distinguishing operating features of wineries that use what has been argued to be the most profitable channel for marketing wine at retail in the USA: the wine club channel. Winery owners and managers will find particular value in the results and implications of the research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Elisa Martin and Peter Williams

This paper identifies policies that have played influential roles in shaping British Columbia’s wine tourism value chain. It identifies those policies that have moulded…

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2332

Abstract

This paper identifies policies that have played influential roles in shaping British Columbia’s wine tourism value chain. It identifies those policies that have moulded the province’s current approach to wine tourism attraction development and resource protection in the Okanagan Valley. It suggests that significant progress has been made in the development of responsible and responsive polices related to these two components of the wine tourism value chain. However, it recommends that policies need to be created at the municipal level so that future wine tourism development protects the integrity and sustainable use of the region’s natural resource base.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Mark A. Bonn, Meehee Cho and Hyemi Um

Wine as a research topic continues to address a plethora of diverse contexts. In consideration of this scope and abundance of wine literature, this study aims to provide…

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1153

Abstract

Purpose

Wine as a research topic continues to address a plethora of diverse contexts. In consideration of this scope and abundance of wine literature, this study aims to provide guidance for future meaningful contributions to this existing body of wine knowledge through a comprehensive scholarly review.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 22 wine business, hospitality and tourism journals were selected and used to identify 739 refereed articles addressing wine-related topics over a 26-year period from 1990 to 2015. This was segmented using five wine research time frames, which were then separately investigated using content analysis and keyword network analysis.

Findings

Results support the importance for continued refinement of certain research areas to add understanding to wine research. In particular, the topics of marketing and tourism pertaining to wine research have fragmented into much more specialized sub-segments over this 26-year period.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include generalizability of findings because of the study’s use of 22 journals, along with the selected 26-year period. Future research should examine other time periods using other publications in peripheral and in non-related areas to seek topics potentially and inadvertently overlooked by this process. Significant topics and trends regarding wine research were identified and classified according to time periods. Information has been provided for future directions and new research agendas.

Originality/value

Based upon an examination of time periods segmented by half-decades, keyword network analysis was used to explore wine research trends. Using keyword network analytics, this method for identifying networks between key words produced findings that have brought the literature regarding wine research to a current status allowing academics to gain insights into potential direction for future research needs.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Joice Lavandoski, Patrícia Pinto, João Albino Silva and Alfonso Vargas-Sánchez

This study aims to propose that the institutional environment exerts pressure on the behavior of wineries toward wine tourism development (WTD) and the effect of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose that the institutional environment exerts pressure on the behavior of wineries toward wine tourism development (WTD) and the effect of this influence confers legitimacy to the business of wine tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling through partial least squares was applied to estimate and validate a model using data from a quantitative survey in the universe of 62 wineries with a wine tourism component along the Alentejo Wine Route in Portugal. The proposed model is based on institutional theory through an inter-organizational perspective of wineries.

Findings

The results show that WTD coexists with a highly institutionalized environment, exerting distinctive mechanisms of external pressure together with the search for social legitimacy through actions and practices on the part of the involved wineries. However, the relationship between legitimacy and organizational performance in wineries with wine tourism is not validated.

Research limitations/implications

The specific sample of the Alentejo wine companies does not allow the results to be generalized. Future studies should replicate the proposed research model using other geographic areas.

Practical implications

The results are particularly interesting for managers of wineries and should be considered in the decision-making and strategic processes regarding wine tourism.

Originality/value

The use of institutional theory in the wine tourism context is novel and original. This study fills a research gap by conducting an empirical investigation of wine tourism based on institutional theory, which allows the identification of exogenous factors that can influence and impose restrictions on the organizational behavior of winery companies toward wine tourism.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

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1735

Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Oksana Grybovych, Jill Lankford and Samuel Lankford

The purpose of this exploratory consumer research study was to examine demographic and behavioral characteristics and motivations of wine travelers on the recently…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory consumer research study was to examine demographic and behavioral characteristics and motivations of wine travelers on the recently established Iowa Wine Trail in rural Northeast Iowa. An array of data on visitor lifestyles, interests, attitudes and values can provide more powerful and actionable research information than demographics alone. Equipped with an understanding of visitor motivations, wineries and vineyards can provide their customers the experience they want and expect, and not products and services they are assumed to desire.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected using a questionnaire-based survey administered at three participating wineries over the period of April-November 2005.

Findings

The demographic profile of visitors on the Iowa Wine Trail falls within a common stereotype of a wine tourist: middle aged (36-55 years old), highly educated (college or postgraduate), in the moderate to high income bracket (higher than the median household income in Iowa), living in close proximity to the Iowa Wine Trail (mostly Iowa residents). The main motives for visiting the wineries were (in order by mean scores) “to taste wine”, “to enjoy the scenery”, “to have a good time with friends and family”, “to relax”, “to support local wine producers”, and “to taste locally produced foods”. This finding supports the statement that wine tourists are often drawn by the whole “local experience package”, and not only by the wine product itself.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study provide demographic and behavioral characteristics and motivations of wine tourists in rural Northeast Iowa only and should not be generalized to other rural areas.

Practical implications

The Iowa Wine Trail attracts typical wine customers, but also younger visitors and females. Rather high incidence of repeat visitors for a trail that is still in its infancy (52 percent), with the mean number of previous visits being 2.64. Importance of word of mouth and eMarketing: over 40 percent of visitors to the Iowa Wine Trail based their choice on word of mouth (to include prior recommendations, suggestions, or reputation), and almost a third of travelers indicated utilizing web sites for information seeking – a number that is higher when compared to other specialized markets in Iowa. The Iowa Wine Trail appeals both to stereotypical wine tourists and those visitors who are not primarily involved with the wine product but nonetheless still visit wineries. Power of rural ambience and appeal of the Iowa landscape: while wine tasting appeared to be the main motive of visiting the wineries, scenery and landscape of the Upper Mississippi River, along with the opportunity to enjoy time with friends and family and taste local foods, scored similarly high.

Originality/value

While demographic characteristics of wine tourists have been explored, few studies focused on visitor motivations. In addition, most of wine tourism research has focused on established and functioning wine regions/appellations. Not much is known about the emerging wine culture in rural Midwestern states embracing opportunities of wine and tourism development, en route to diversification from traditional agriculture.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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