Search results

1 – 10 of 34
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Wouter Robijn, Martin C. Euwema, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jana Deprez

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs…

2216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs satisfaction between these relations is proposed based on self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used with 133 employees who rated their leader, their team and their own basic need satisfaction and engagement to analyze the direct and indirect effects simultaneously.

Findings

The analysis confirmed that both engaging leadership and open conflict norms had an indirect effect on work engagement through basic needs satisfaction. Furthermore, engaging leadership was positively related with open conflict norms.

Research limitations/implications

The current study adds to the validation of engaging leadership as it confirms that engaging leaders strengthen work engagement through basic need satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that not only the leader is important, but the team can impact their well-being through the creation of other social resources as open conflict norms.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that not only leaders are important to increase work engagement through basic needs satisfaction but also other social resources, such as conflict management. This offers a brand new perspective and opportunities on how to increase work engagement using social resources as conflict management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jeroen Stouten

The current study investigates the mediating role of job resources (JRs) (i.e. person-–ob fit, value congruence, alignment, job control, use of skills, participation in…

1750

Abstract

Purpose

The current study investigates the mediating role of job resources (JRs) (i.e. person-–ob fit, value congruence, alignment, job control, use of skills, participation in decision-making, coworker support and performance feedback) and basic psychological need satisfaction at work (i.e. autonomy, relatedness, competence and meaningfulness) in the relationship between engaging leadership (EL) (i.e. inspiring, strengthening, empowering and connecting) and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation analysis was used to test the mediation hypotheses, using a two-wave longitudinal design and an Indonesian sample of 412 employees from an agribusiness state-owned company.

Findings

The results show that EL at baseline 2017 (T1) predicts T1–T2 increase in work engagement (WE) directly, as well as indirectly through T1 JRs, and T1–T2 increase in basic psychological need satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research extends the job demands-resources (JD-R) model by showing the important role of ELfor fostering WE through increasing JRs and satisfying basic psychological needs at work.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Ilona van Beek, Toon W. Taris, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Veerle Brenninkmeijer

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus…

2170

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus theory, the paper examines which work goals workaholic and engaged employees pursue and which strategies they use to achieve these goals. Furthermore, the paper examines how workaholism and work engagement relate to three different work outcomes: job satisfaction, turnover intention, and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a cross-sectional survey study among 680 Dutch employees in the banking industry were analysed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The analyses revealed that workaholism was primarily and positively associated with having a prevention focus, whereas work engagement was primarily and positively associated with having a promotion focus. Furthermore, workaholism was negatively related to job satisfaction and job performance, and positively related to turnover intention, whereas work engagement was positively associated with job satisfaction and job performance, and negatively associated with turnover intention. Both forms of heavy work investment almost fully mediated the associations between the regulatory foci and the three work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions rely on self-report data, a relatively homogeneous sample, and a cross-sectional design. This may have biased our findings to some degree and does not allow inferring causal conclusions.

Practical implications

The findings show that workaholic and engaged employees have different work goals and use different strategies to pursue these goals. Moreover, both forms of heavy work investment are oppositely related to work outcomes. Organizations may develop policies to reduce workaholism and to promote work engagement by influencing their employees' regulatory foci.

Originality/value

The present study demonstrates that two types of heavy work investment can be distinguished, each with a unique motivational make-up and a unique pattern of work outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Else Ouweneel, Pascale M. Le Blanc and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The main objective of this study is to apply broaden‐and‐build theory to occupational wellbeing. More specifically, it seeks to test whether positive emotions “build” resources…

3667

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this study is to apply broaden‐and‐build theory to occupational wellbeing. More specifically, it seeks to test whether positive emotions “build” resources and to what extent they contribute to work engagement through an increase in personal or job resources. Additionally, it aims to hypothesize that positive emotions, resources, and work engagement are reciprocally related to each other in a way akin to a gain cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to test whether positive emotions, personal and job resources, and work engagement are related over time, a structural equation model was constructed. The model was based on two waves of data, with a time lag of six months.

Findings

Results show a reciprocal relationship between positive emotions and personal resources. Furthermore, there is a causal effect of personal resources on work engagement and a reversed causal effect of work engagement on positive emotions. Most surprising is the fact that no relationships with job resources are found to be significant.

Research limitations/implications

Because the authors exclusively used self‐report measures to assess positive emotions, resources, and work engagement, the cross‐paths might have been inflated.

Practical implications

The results underline the importance of increasing both positive emotions and the level of personal resources in order to create an engaged workforce.

Originality/value

The study adds to the existing literature in the sense that the research model entailed positive emotions as a “novel” variable in the context of resources and work engagement. The model recognized the building capacity of positive emotions as well as the potential of personal resources in predicting work engagement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Lotta K. Harju, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jari J. Hakanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine cross-level effects of team-level servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. Cross-level moderating effects…

4033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine cross-level effects of team-level servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. Cross-level moderating effects of team-level servant leadership were also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal study employed a multilevel design in a sample of 237 employees, clustered into 47 teams. Servant leadership was aggregated to the team-level to examine the effects of shared perceptions of leadership at T1 on individual-level outcome, namely job boredom, at T2. In addition, mediation analysis was used to test whether team-level servant leadership at T1 can protect followers from job boredom at T2 by fostering job crafting at T2. Cross-level moderating effects of team-level servant leadership at T1 on the relation between job crafting at T2 and job boredom at T2 were also modeled.

Findings

Job crafting at T2 mediated the cross-level effect of team-level servant leadership at T1 on job boredom at T2.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that team-level servant leadership predicts less job boredom by boosting job crafting.

Originality/value

This study is the first to assess the effects of servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. This paper examines job boredom in a multilevel design, thus extending knowledge on its contextual components.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Qiao Hu and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of job insecurity (past job downsizing and anticipated job downsizing) and current remuneration – via wellbeing (burnout and work…

3382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of job insecurity (past job downsizing and anticipated job downsizing) and current remuneration – via wellbeing (burnout and work engagement) – on organizational outcomes (organization commitment and low turnover intention) of Chinese family‐owned business.

Design/methodology/approach

The Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model is used as a conceptual framework and data from 585 workers of three Chinese family‐style factories were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results confirm the hypothesized model indicating that in accordance with the JD‐R model: job resources (i.e. job downsizing and current remuneration) are associated with organizational outcomes through wellbeing (burnout and work engagement) and; anticipated job downsizing fully mediates the relation of past job downsizing with wellbeing.

Originality/value

The current study examined the effects of job insecurity (i.e. downsizing) and current remuneration on organization outcomes of workers in Chinese family‐owned business using a questionnaire survey. To date, studies using the JD‐R model focused on other work characteristics but overlooked the potential role of job insecurity and current remuneration. The study demonstrated the importance of anticipated and past downsizing and current remuneration for employee wellbeing and organization outcomes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Qiao Hu, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Toon W. Taris

This study aims to investigate the relation between job demands and job resources on the one hand and employee well‐being (burnout and work engagement) on the other. It was…

2396

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relation between job demands and job resources on the one hand and employee well‐being (burnout and work engagement) on the other. It was assumed that this relation is mediated by an equity‐based cognitive evaluation process.

Design/methodology/approach

This mediation hypothesis was tested using the Job‐Demands Resources model in two Chinese samples of blue collar workers (n=625) and nurses (n=1,381).

Findings

As expected, structural equation analysis revealed that equity mediated the relation of job demands and job resources with burnout and work engagement among nurses. However, mediation was only partly confirmed among blue collar workers. In addition, and as expected, among nurses equity was non‐linearly related with burnout.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the present study precludes causal conclusions.

Originality/value

The study extended the JD‐R model with an equity‐based cognitive evaluation process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Dina Guglielmi, Silvia Simbula, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Marco Depolo

This study aims to investigate school principals' well‐being by using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model as a theoretical framework. It aims at making a significant…

3346

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate school principals' well‐being by using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model as a theoretical framework. It aims at making a significant contribution to the development of this model by considering not only job demands and job resources, but also the role of personal resources and personal demands as predictors of work engagement and burnout. In particular, it was hypothesised that job demands may mediate the relationship between workaholism and burnout, whereas job resources may mediate the relationship between self‐efficacy and work engagement and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study was conducted. In total, 224 school principals (67 percent women) during training activities completed a questionnaire.

Findings

The results of SEM analyses largely supported the hypotheses by showing that personal variables operate as initiators of health impairment and motivational processes.

Research limitations/implications

The study lends support to the literature on individual resources that underlines the role that personal resources play in work engagement and burnout. It contributes to the JD‐R model by highlighting the role of personal demands (i.e. workaholism), which has an effect on the development of burnout in school principals.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings for interventions aimed at the promotion of school principals' well‐being are discussed.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of the role played by personal resources and personal demands in the job demands‐resources model. The value added is represented by the study of workaholism as personal demand, which in turn influences job demands and also the health impairment it triggers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Chiara Consiglio, Laura Borgogni, Cristina Di Tecco and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

Work engagement represents an important aspect of employee well-being and performance and has been related to both job and personal resources. The purpose of this paper, based on…

3921

Abstract

Purpose

Work engagement represents an important aspect of employee well-being and performance and has been related to both job and personal resources. The purpose of this paper, based on Social Cognitive Theory, is to emphasize the proactive role of self-efficacy which is hypothesized to predict work engagement, not only directly, but also indirectly through positive changes in employee’s perceptions of social context (PoSC); namely, perceptions of one’s immediate supervisor, colleagues and top management.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 741 employees of a communication service company completed two questionnaires, with a time interval of three years. Structural equation modeling was performed in order to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

Results revealed that, as expected: first, initial self-efficacy predicts work engagement three years later; and second, positive changes in employee’s perceptions of the social work context across the three year period, mediates the relationship between self-efficacy and work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

Results relied only upon self-report data. Moreover, each variable was only measured at the time in which it was hypothesized by the conceptual model.

Practical implications

The significant role of self-efficacy as a direct and indirect predictor of work engagement suggests the development of training programs centered on the main sources of self-efficacy, specifically focussed on the social work domain.

Originality/value

This research provides evidence of the substantial contribution of self-efficacy to work engagement over time. Moreover, the results also support the beneficial effects of self-efficacy through its influence on the improvements in the individuals’ perceptions of their social context.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Jos Akkermans, Veerle Brenninkmeijer, Seth N.J. van den Bossche, Roland W.B. Blonk and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to identify job characteristics that determine young employees' wellbeing, health, and performance, and to compare educational groups.

1397

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify job characteristics that determine young employees' wellbeing, health, and performance, and to compare educational groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model and 2‐wave longitudinal data (n=1,284), the paper compares employees with a lower educational level with employees with a high educational level.

Findings

Young employees with lower educational level reported fewer job resources (autonomy and social support), more physical demands, less dedication, more emotional exhaustion, and poorer health and performance compared with the highly educated group. Differences were also found between educational groups in the relationships in the JD‐R model, most notably a reciprocal association between dedication and performance, and between emotional exhaustion and performance in the group with lower levels of education.

Research limitations/implications

The results support the main processes of the JD‐R model, supporting its generalizability. However, differences were found between educational groups, implying that the motivational and health impairment processes differ across educational levels.

Practical implications

HR consultants and career counselors may focus especially on increasing job resources and motivation for young employees with lower educational level. Performing well is also important for these young workers to become more dedicated and less exhausted.

Social implications

It is important to recognize and intervene on unique characteristics of different educational groups with regard to wellbeing, health, and performance in order to maintain a healthy and productive young workforce.

Originality/value

For the first time, predictions of the JD‐R model are tested among young employees with different educational backgrounds.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 34