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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Andrew Kamunda, Suresh Renukappa, Subashini Suresh and Haddy Jallow

The UK water industry is a private sector that has no government mandate to implement building information modelling (BIM) but would benefit from its use. Research has…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK water industry is a private sector that has no government mandate to implement building information modelling (BIM) but would benefit from its use. Research has identified that fragmentation and inefficiency still existed in the water industry project delivery processes. These issues can be addressed by harnessing the collaboration that BIM brings by using emerging information technology. The UK water industry has had little research in the use of BIM in the project delivery processes over the years.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of the research is to explore and examine BIM elements currently used in the water industry, as well as understand the organisational cultural support for BIM. It also investigated the adoption of BIM which will enable to improve water industry project delivery processes. An empirical study was performed in the UK given the relatively new and unexplored nature of the research problem, a qualitative research methodology was adopted. In total, 14 semi-structured interviews from six water sector organisations were conducted to collect data, which was then analysed using thematic analysis for inference and conclusion.

Findings

The study identified that BIM has already changed how projects are delivered by the water companies and their supply chain. Use of emerging technology such as Autodesk Revit, Civil 3D and virtual reality has gained traction and is leading organisations to continue investing in these areas to remain relevant. Although staff training was offered by all organisations within the study cohort, some interviews still thought that more can be done by their organisations as BIM is still maturing. Those interviewed regarded BIM models as data and information rich with the ability to enable the supply chain to obtain quicker approvals.

Originality/value

The paper provides a richer insight into the understanding and awareness of BIM elements used in the water industry to improve project delivery processes. This study suggests that the water industry supply chain has taken positive steps and started to benefit from BIM use. It also recommends that there is a need for cross-sector collaboration to capture and share best and worst practices relating to BIM adoption in the water sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Zhifang Zhou, Tao Zhang, Jiachun Chen, Huixiang Zeng and Xiaohong Chen

This paper investigates the relationship between product market competition and firms’ water information disclosure and how firms’ ownership type can affect this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the relationship between product market competition and firms’ water information disclosure and how firms’ ownership type can affect this relationship in China, offering new insights into corporate water management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigated 303 Chinese listed companies in highly water-sensitive industries to examine how product market competition influences corporate water information disclosure by subdividing the product market competition into market competition at the firm level and the industry competition intensity at the industry level.

Findings

The results show that there exists an inverted U-shaped relationship between industry competition and water information disclosure; enterprises with the highest market power in a mildly competitive industry are more willing to voluntarily disclose water information and play an industry benchmarking role. Further tests demonstrate that the relationship between industry competition intensity and water information disclosure is stronger for state-owned enterprises than for private enterprises.

Research limitations/implications

The current water resources regulations in China are relatively lax and the water risk awareness of firms is weak, which may affect the applicability of the results. In addition, water information disclosure research is a relatively new field and a quantitative index system for water information disclosure is still in the exploratory stage. Further developments, including the selection, definition and measuring methods of a water index are required.

Practical implications

The authors developed a new direction of enterprise water management activities from the perspective of market competition. Based on the market conditions in China, the authors also investigated the impact of the ownership type of the enterprises on the relationship between market competition and water information disclosure.

Social implications

The authors suggested that the government should improve laws and regulations and adopt incentive mechanisms to encourage enterprises to implement water resource management. In addition, the government should encourage high market status enterprises to actively fulfill their environmental responsibilities so that the entire industry is encouraged to follow suit.

Originality/value

This study represents an important development in the field of environmental accounting and is the first research on corporate water information disclosure; it also extends the research on the influence mechanisms of market competition on the environmental management practices of enterprises.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

M. Jacob

Water, as a major and vital component of food manufacture, is discussed in terms of the food industry's responsibility for its quality, in various types of establishment.

Abstract

Water, as a major and vital component of food manufacture, is discussed in terms of the food industry's responsibility for its quality, in various types of establishment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Keryn Chalmers, Jayne M. Godfrey and Barbara Lynch

Accounting and water industry experts are developing general‐purpose water accounting (GPWA) to report information about water and rights to water. The system has the…

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5389

Abstract

Purpose

Accounting and water industry experts are developing general‐purpose water accounting (GPWA) to report information about water and rights to water. The system has the potential to affect water policies, pricing and management, and investment and other decisions that are affected by GPWA report users' understanding of water risks faced by an entity. It may also affect financial returns to accounting and auditing firms and firms in water industries. In this paper the authors aim to examine the roles of the accounting profession, water industries and other stakeholders in governing GPWA. Recognising that the fate of GPWA depends partly upon regulatory power and economics, they seek to apply regulatory theories that explain financial accounting standards development to speculate about the national and international future of GPWA.

Design/methodology/approach

Official documents, internal Water Accounting Standards Board documents and unstructured interviews underpin the authors' analysis.

Findings

The authors speculate about the benefits that might accrue to various stakeholder groups from capturing the GPWA standard‐setting process. They also suggest that internationally, water industries may dominate early GPWA standards development in the public interest and that regulatory capture by accounting or water industry professionals will not necessarily conflict with public interest benefits.

Practical implications

Accounting for water can affect allocations of environmental, economic, social and other resources; also, accounting and water industry professional standing and revenues. In this paper the authors identify factors influencing GPWA standards and standard‐setting institutional arrangements, and thereby these resource allocations. The paper generates an awareness of GPWA's emergence and practical implications.

Originality/value

This is an early study to investigate water accounting standard‐setting regulatory influences and their impact.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Jeffrey Feghaly, Mounir El Asmar, Samuel Ariaratnam and Wylie Bearup

The purpose of this paper is to identify key project delivery method selection factors to assist water industry decision-makers in selecting the most appropriate delivery…

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282

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key project delivery method selection factors to assist water industry decision-makers in selecting the most appropriate delivery method for their water treatment plant projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The selection factors were identified by compiling and validating key project delivery selection factors across various industries through an extensive literature review and two industry expert workshops. This resulted in the development of a web-based decision-support tool to facilitate project delivery method selection within the water industry.

Findings

The research effort led to the identification of 13 key project delivery method selection factors (seven primary factors and six secondary factors) for water treatment plant projects. These factors were utilized to develop EXPRSS-TP, a pioneering web-based project delivery method decision-support tool for the water industry.

Practical implications

A project delivery method selection process is typically an informal process that may range from days to weeks at a time. Based on this work, the assessment can now be completed in about one hour and provides decision-makers with the most favorable delivery method for their project. And with the new tool that encompasses the new knowledge, not only is the decision reached at an accelerated pace, EXPRSS-TP also documents the entire selection process, allowing for a written and retained record of this key decision and its procedure.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the exisiting body of knowledge by identifying key project delivery selection factors across numerous industries, assessing and combining them, and finally incorporating them into one comprehensive process. EXPRSS-TP improves the traditional project delivery method selection process and provides evidence-based project delivery method selection recommendations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

David R.J. Moore and Ken McPhail

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the three abstract-concrete levels of ontology of strong structuration theory (strong ST) to examine how, and to what extent, was…

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1324

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the three abstract-concrete levels of ontology of strong structuration theory (strong ST) to examine how, and to what extent, was the development of carbon accounting frameworks at the policy, industry, and organizational levels enabled by external structures as conditions of action, that is, what was the nature of active agency within a field of position-practice relations that led to the development of these frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was undertaken drawing upon interviews that were undertaken between 2008 and 2011 at the industry and organizational levels as well as documentary evidence relating to carbon accounting policy development at the macro, or policy level.

Findings

The parliamentary committee hearings into the development of the carbon price legislation represented fields of position-practice relationships which highlighted the interplay of the internal structures, capabilities and the roles of both power and trust of the agent(s)-in-focus. A meso-level analysis of the Victorian water industry highlighted how it was able to mediate the exercise of power by the macro level through the early adoption of carbon accounting frameworks. At the ontic or micro level of the individual water business, the development of a greenhouse strategy was also the outcome of position-practice relationships which highlighted the interplay of the internal structures and dispositions of the agent(s)-in-focus. The position-practice relationships at both the industry and organizational level were characterized by both soft power and trust.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could investigate how the withdrawal of the carbon pricing mechanism in Australia has affected the development of carbon accounting practices whilst overseas research could examine the extent to which carbon accounting frameworks were the outcome of position-practice relationships.

Practical implications

Given the global significance of carbon accounting, this paper provides an overview as to how the early adoption of voluntary carbon accounting practices resulted in a reduction in carbon emissions within the water industry and therefore limited its liability for the carbon price.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates how the strong ST ontological concept of position-practices can be utilized at the macro, meso, and ontic levels and how these relationships mediated the impact of the carbon price upon both the water industry and the individual water business.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Natalia Antonova, Inés Ruiz-Rosa and Javier Mendoza-Jiménez

This study aims to structure research on water resources in the hotel industry, identifying the key areas and research gaps in this field.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to structure research on water resources in the hotel industry, identifying the key areas and research gaps in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review of water use in the hotel industry has been performed using the Scopus and Web of Science databases. From 515 articles selected between the years 2000 and 2019, a sample of 58 articles was used to structure existing research on this subject.

Findings

Research is classified into four groups: water consumption, water management, impacts of water use and good practices, with different research methods and topics within each one. Existing research gaps and their causes are also discussed. The results show how academic research can help strengthen international methodologies that measure sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the search process, some publications on water consumption in the hotel industry may have been missed; also book chapters and conference papers were excluded. Furthermore, the authors recognise some subjectivity in the classification of articles.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis focussed on water use in the hotel industry. The findings can be used to build a research framework for this area, establishing an approach to cover research gaps and to connect academic research with general methodologies and indicators of sustainability, as well as improving data collection techniques in this field.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Okke Braadbaart

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how benchmarking affects transparency and economic performance in the public sector.

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1817

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how benchmarking affects transparency and economic performance in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a quasi‐experimental method to 1989‐2000 time series data on benchmarking and non‐benchmarking water utilities in The Netherlands.

Findings

Benchmarking immediately enhanced transparency, but only affected utility economic performance after benchmarking information entered the public domain. This confirms that benchmarking enhances transparency and performance. The findings do not support the yardstick regulation hypothesis that utility managers will only tighten financial discipline when benchmarking is embedded in a regime of managed competition.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is its single‐industry scope. Further testing of benchmarking effects in other public services is needed to validate its findings.

Originality/value

The paper presents evidence from the Dutch water supply industry focusing on transparency and performance in collaborative benchmarking.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Simon Ayo Adekunle and Olamitunji Dakare

This study empirically examined and investigated the relationship between sustainable manufacturing practices (SMPs) and performance of table water industry (TWI) in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

This study empirically examined and investigated the relationship between sustainable manufacturing practices (SMPs) and performance of table water industry (TWI) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey research design was adopted for this study. The population of this study covers all the registered table water firms in Delta and Edo states by National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC). Convenience sampling, a nonprobability sampling method, was used in administering the questionnaire to selected table water firms in the two states used for the study. The sample can be considered as experimental group used for the research and analysis. Data collected through questionnaire administration were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used in estimating the research models, through the use of Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS version 24) software.

Findings

The study found that SMPs are adopted by table water firms registered by NAFDAC. It was also found that sustainable packaging and waste management significantly influence the different dimensions of sustainable performance of table water firms.

Practical implications

The study recommends that table water producers should ensure they consistently adhere to NAFDAC standards after product registration and certification to make the products safe for consumption. Also, NAFDAC should promote a regulatory environment with appropriate incentives to table water firms that consistently comply with stipulated regulations that can promote the sustainability of the environment while any table water firms found engaging in unwholesome activities that can undermine the health status of consumers should be severely sanctioned.

Originality/value

The study provides a comprehensive analysis of sustainability practices in the Nigerian TWI by examining four manufacturing practices and how they impact on sustainability performance of the industry. The study will help to reinforce the need for stakeholders in the TWI to be more environmentally conscious.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1991

Han Guogang, Jiang Fenglan and Yan Jimin

The problems of water supply of China in 2000 are revealed bystatistical data. It is shown that 450 cities will be short of freshwater; a great quantity is utilised in…

Abstract

The problems of water supply of China in 2000 are revealed by statistical data. It is shown that 450 cities will be short of fresh water; a great quantity is utilised in agriculture much of which can be saved; groundwater is over‐extracted; the level of water is falling by an average of 1‐2mu each year which has caused the subsiding of regional earth; the quality of drinking water and of water utilised in industry becomes poorer; water resources are polluted because of the increase in organic pollutants, the number and size of cities, the pollution of nutrient and colon bacillus, the decrease in the area of lakes, the shortage of money for administration, the amount of polluted water drained without efficient treatment, the low re‐utilisation ratio of water, and the low rate of sewerage system development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 18 no. 8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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