Search results

1 – 10 of over 11000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Joakim Hans Kembro, Veronica Danielsson and Granit Smajli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how modern network video technology could be used to improve different warehouse types and operations and how barriers may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how modern network video technology could be used to improve different warehouse types and operations and how barriers may prevent its implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory multiple-case study with nine case companies was conducted, including on-site visits, interviews, questionnaires and a workshop.

Findings

The authors identified 12 video applications that could improve warehouse operations by making them safer, faster, more transparent and more reliable than they are at present. The authors found that video applications complemented existing information technology and offered a new dimension that provided the real-time analysis of different activities in warehouse operations. The main barriers to implementing video technology included uncertain return on investment, staff integrity, union restrictions and integration with other systems.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the literature by exploring how information technology could be used to improve warehouse operations and by developing a classification matrix that outlines the video applications that suit the warehouse type and operation. Building on the contingency theory, the authors also described a conceptual framework for guiding future relevant research on warehousing.

Practical implications

Video technology provides an opportunity to improve efficiency and cut costs in warehouse operations, which could contribute to increasing the competitiveness of the company and the supply chain. However, several barriers must be overcome to enable its implementation. Furthermore, competing technologies, such as augmented reality and the internet of things, are being developed in parallel.

Social implications

The identified video applications could help to increase safety, sustainability and traceability in warehouse operations and, potentially, across the entire supply chain.

Originality/value

This research is the first to explore the potential of introducing video applications to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of various warehouse types and operations.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

A. Gunasekaran, H.B. Marri and F. Menci

The warehouse is the interface area for production lines, market, customers and suppliers, and the business environment in general. Goods inwards (GI), constituting part…

Abstract

The warehouse is the interface area for production lines, market, customers and suppliers, and the business environment in general. Goods inwards (GI), constituting part of the warehouse activities, is the department responsible for booking‐in the incoming parts from external suppliers. After the production process is improved, the resources in the warehouse are balanced to link the internal/ external transfer of physical items. With a broader view of the GI activities, and a look into its future, the actual problems may become clear, understandable, and hence easy to solve. The aim of this paper is to study the problem areas in GI and provide solutions to increase the performance of warehousing operations. First, a conceptual framework has been developed to improve the effectiveness of warehousing operations. Second, a case study has been conducted with the help of the model to minimize the through‐put time in warehousing operations. Finally, a summary of findings and recommendations are presented.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Joakim Hans Kembro, Andreas Norrman and Ebba Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of how warehouse operations and design are affected by the move toward integrated omni-channels.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of how warehouse operations and design are affected by the move toward integrated omni-channels.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured literature review is conducted to identify and categorize themes in multi- and omni-channel logistics, and to discuss how aspects related to these themes impact and pose contingencies for warehouse operations and design.

Findings

The review revealed a lack of focus on warehouse operations and design in multi- and omni-channels. Instead, most articles published in scientific journals discuss changes in consumer demand and implications for the network level, concerning aspects such as the organization and management of material and information flows, inventory management, resources, actors and relationships. Ten themes in omni-channel logistics were identified and grouped into two categories: the value proposition and channel management; and the physical distribution network design. The themes and related aspects have implications for warehousing, and by combining these with general warehousing knowledge, the authors derive a comprehensive and structured agenda is derived to guide future research on omni-channel warehousing.

Research limitations/implications

This paper outlines a research agenda, including detailed research questions, for advancing the theory on warehouse operations and design in omni-channels.

Practical implications

The agenda can inspire practitioners in their work to understand the upcoming challenges and address relevant issues in omni-channel warehousing, taking into consideration its interdependence with value proposition, channel management and network decisions.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive review focusing on and synthesizing available literature on omni-channel warehousing. This topic has until now received limited coverage but is of increasing importance to scholars in the field.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

M.B.M. de Koster and P.M.J. Warffemius

This paper aims to report a survey carried out among European distribution centres (EDCs) in The Netherlands. EDCs are forerunners in implementing advanced logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report a survey carried out among European distribution centres (EDCs) in The Netherlands. EDCs are forerunners in implementing advanced logistics systems, since they are responsible for the distribution of a manufacturer's products to customers in a larger part of Europe, Middle East and Africa, often with strict service level agreements.

Design/methodology/approach

Warehouses with different outsourcing relations (own‐account, dedicated outsourced and public outsourced) are compared on operational aspects, performance, and future developments. Moreover, within the group of own‐account warehouses, especially Asian and American operations are tested for differences.

Findings

Outsourced warehouse operations appear to have a higher percentage of error‐free deliveries and to be more flexible than own‐account operations. Based on the literature it was expected that a difference in productivity and quality between American and Asian EDCs would be found. Some differences in operations are found. For example, Asian EDCs put more effort in quality methods and involve more native managers. However, significant differences in productivity and quality levels were not found. Apparently, the differences in operations do not have a substantial effect on the warehouse performance.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to compare advanced warehouse operations from different origins, either operated by service providers or not.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Tritos Laosirihongthong, Dotun Adebanjo, Premaratne Samaranayake, Nachiappan Subramanian and Sakun Boon-itt

Due to the importance of efficiency and responsiveness measures rather than just efficiency measures, this research recognizes both measures when considering overall…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the importance of efficiency and responsiveness measures rather than just efficiency measures, this research recognizes both measures when considering overall performance of warehouse operations. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to prioritize overall performance measures associated with warehouse operations in manufacturing, third-party logistics service provider and retail industry supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an integrated approach that involves the Q-sort method to group measures into four categories. Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process was then used to prioritize individual performance measures within each category and integer liner programming model was used to validate prioritized categories, using the judgment of multiple decision makers across three industries.

Findings

The result shows that the financial category is a dominating performance category in managing warehouse operations across all three industries selected. Within the financial category, cost of insurance accounted for 25 percent of total weight of the category, and is considered to be a powerful measure. The financial category is verified by multiple decision makers across three industries, as the most important performance category.

Research limitations/implications

As part of adopting the proposed methodology in practice, it needs to be guided by overall methodology appropriate for industry-specific contexts.

Originality/value

Key novel aspects of this study are to categorize warehouse operations measures and analyze their perspectives in different industries, understand dominant categories of warehouse operations measures in the contemporary supply chain and finally to explore to what extent current practices lead to achieving efficiency and responsiveness in the selected industries.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

David Ray, John Gattorna and Mike Allen

Preface The functions of business divide into several areas and the general focus of this book is on one of the most important although least understood of…

Abstract

Preface The functions of business divide into several areas and the general focus of this book is on one of the most important although least understood of these—DISTRIBUTION. The particular focus is on reviewing current practice in distribution costing and on attempting to push the frontiers back a little by suggesting some new approaches to overcome previously defined shortcomings.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Maria Pires, Joaquim Pratas, Jorge Liz and Pedro Amorim

The design of retail backroom storage areas has great impact on in-store operations, customer service level and on store life-cycle costs. Moreover, backroom storage in…

Abstract

Purpose

The design of retail backroom storage areas has great impact on in-store operations, customer service level and on store life-cycle costs. Moreover, backroom storage in modern retail grocery stores is critical to several functions, such as acting as a buffer against strong demand lifts yielded by an ever-increasing promotional activity, stocking seasonal peak demand and accommodating e-commerce activities. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to design retail backroom storage area. Furthermore, the authors aim to draw attention to the lack of literature on this topic, while clarifying the relationship between this promising research stream and the considerable body of research regarding the design and operations of conventional warehouses, as well as retail in-store operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The key literature on backrooms, grocery retail, in-store operations, warehouse design and operations was reviewed. This allowed an understanding of the gap in the literature regarding the design of backrooms. Moreover, a case study methodological approach was conducted in a Portuguese retailer to extend the literature review.

Findings

Despite having functions similar to conventional warehouses, backroom storage facilities have particularities that deserve a distinct analysis. Thus, the authors stress these differences and demonstrate how they influence the development of a novel backroom design framework.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap by proposing a framework to design backroom areas. Furthermore, this research may help practitioners to better design backroom areas, since this process currently lacks a formal and standardized procedure.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Anna Corinna Cagliano, Alberto DeMarco, Carlo Rafele and Sergio Volpe

The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of how different sourcing policies and resource usage affect the operational performance dynamics of warehouse processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of how different sourcing policies and resource usage affect the operational performance dynamics of warehouse processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The system dynamics (SD) methodology is used to model warehouse operations at the distribution centre of a leading fast‐fashion vertical retailer. This case study includes a detailed analysis of the relationships between the flow of items through the warehouse, the assignment of staff, the inventory management policy, and the order processing tasks.

Findings

Case scenario simulations are provided to define warehouse policies enabling increased efficiency, cost savings, reduced inventory, and shorter lead‐times.

Practical implications

The case study reaffirms that a flexible usage of human resources, outsourcing of selected warehouse operations, and sourcing from reliable manufacturers may result in important performance improvements for centralised warehousing.

Originality/value

It is proved that SD is a valuable tool in the field of operations management, not only to support strategic evaluations but also to execute a detailed analysis of logistical processes and make scenario‐based dynamic decisions at the operational level.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Ifadhila Affia and Ammar Aamer

Real-time visibility and traceability in warehousing could be accomplished by implementing the internet-of-things (IoT) technology. The purpose of this paper is to develop…

Abstract

Purpose

Real-time visibility and traceability in warehousing could be accomplished by implementing the internet-of-things (IoT) technology. The purpose of this paper is to develop a roadmap for designing an IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure and, respectively, design and apply the IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure using a developed roadmap. More specifically, this study first identifies critical components to design an IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure. Second, the study at hand identifies essential factors that contribute to the successful implementation of IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative-descriptive method, through a comprehensive review of the relevant studies, was used in this study to develop a roadmap. A prototype system was then designed to simulate a case company’s actual warehouse operations in one of the manufacturing companies in Indonesia.

Findings

A framework was proposed which is viable for designing an IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure. Based on the data collected from a case company, the proposed smart warehouse infrastructure design successfully implemented real-time visibility and traceability and improved overall warehouse efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

While the framework in this research was carried out in one of the developing counties, the study could be used as the basis for future research in a smart warehouse, IoT and related topics.

Originality/value

This research enhances the limited knowledge to establish the IoT infrastructure for a smart warehouse to enable real-time visibility and traceability. This study is also the first to specifically propose a framework for designing an IoT-based smart warehouse infrastructure. The proposed framework can motivate companies in developing countries to deploy efficient and effective smart warehouses using IoT to drive the countries’ economic growth.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

S.I. Lao, K.L. Choy, G.T.S. Ho and Richard C.M. Yam

The purpose of this paper is to propose a real‐time food receiving operations management system (RFRS), focusing on demonstrating the use of a case‐based reasoning (CBR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a real‐time food receiving operations management system (RFRS), focusing on demonstrating the use of a case‐based reasoning (CBR) and radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in managing the complex food receiving activities in distribution centers, to deal with the global concerns in food safety management.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed system includes a CBR engine for generating customized operating procedures by retrieving and analyzing relevant knowledge stored in the database and case library. In addition, RFID technology is adopted to gather real‐time inventory information for visualizing inventories, work stations, and equipment status.

Findings

The significance and contribution of RFRS in the context of managing unstructured operations in distribution centers for the food receiving process are demonstrated by adopting the system in one of the Hong Kong‐based logistics companies. The achieved improvement of order fulfillment helps achieve a systematic management in operations process flow. Moreover, the time saving in resource assignment helps improve the operations efficiency of the receiving zone. Hence, the decrease in the faults of quality checking helps improve the service and quality level. All of the above demonstrate the feasibility of the RFID‐based decision support system.

Originality/value

A superior method for the management of quality control and service of the receiving process is essential for the success of food distribution centers. However, the complexity of these management processes increases with the rise of customization of service in the supply chain. Hence, such increase in the operation complexity leads to the increase in operation time and, consequently, a decrease in the service quality. The real‐time food receiving operations management system proposed in this paper integrated RFID and case‐based reasoning technology in dealing with food warehouse receiving operation assignment. This is a brand new application combining the two technologies in the field of food reception in warehouses. With the support of the system, the efficiency and the customer satisfaction are improved.

1 – 10 of over 11000