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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2008

Gary Ritter and Rebecca Maynard

Academically focused tutoring programmes for young children have been promoted widely in the US in various forms as promising strategies for improving academic…

117

Abstract

Academically focused tutoring programmes for young children have been promoted widely in the US in various forms as promising strategies for improving academic performance, particularly in reading and mathematics. A body of evidence shows the benefits of tutoring provided by certified, paid professionals; however, the evidence is less clear for tutoring programmes staffed by adult volunteers or college students. In this article, we describe a relatively large‐scale university‐based programme that creates tutoring partnerships between college‐aged volunteers and students from surrounding elementary schools. We used a randomised trial to evaluate the effectiveness of this programme for 196 students from 11 elementary schools over one school year, focusing on academic grades and standardised test scores, confidence in academic ability, motivation and school attendance. We discuss the null findings in order to inform the conditions under which student support programmes can be successful.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2008

Gary Ritter and Marc Holley

The use of random assignment can be effective and appropriate in the evaluation of programmes that serve children in schools. Because random assignment creates…

112

Abstract

The use of random assignment can be effective and appropriate in the evaluation of programmes that serve children in schools. Because random assignment creates pre‐treatment equality between treatment and control groups, this methodology is particularly effective for understanding the impact of an intervention. Contemporary research on educational experiments has tended to focus on programme results rather than on their origin or implementation. While programme results are important, they provide little guidance to those interested in designing and implementing programme evaluations that use random assignment. This article shares the practical lessons learned from three educational experiments with researchers and practitioners interested in pursuing evaluations that use random assignment.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Iona Johnson

This chapter explores the work of a library adult literacy programme working closely with other education providers in Risdon Prison in Australia. The Literacy Service…

Abstract

This chapter explores the work of a library adult literacy programme working closely with other education providers in Risdon Prison in Australia. The Literacy Service operates as a form of outreach to the prison population who have low literacy levels and are not yet engaged in education or using the prison library. In this context, it is a form of radical inclusion, creating opportunities for those most disadvantaged to access learning. The library services help to create a literate environment for prisoners and provide opportunities for prisoners to increase their engagement in lifelong learning and everyday literacy practices, giving them a better chance of developing their literacy skills. Strategies explored for engaging this cohort include a range of creative projects, small group work and one to one tutoring. The Literacy Service has developed best practice approaches to deliver effective literacy support using strategies and approaches that align with research and these are adapted for work in the prison context. The Literacy Service approach is aligned with the wider prison goals of rehabilitation and reintegration and the chapter explores a theory of change to identify how prison education may be most effective in supporting rehabilitation (Szifris, Fox, & Bradbury, 2018). The library Literacy Service offers safe spaces, opportunities to create social bonds, reshape identity, engage in informal learning and set new goals – key elements found to be critical in rehabilitation. The Prison Library Impact Framework, developed by Finlay and Bates (2018), connects these elements with the theory of change model to propose a tool that may be useful to evaluate prison library services in the future.

Details

Exploring the Roles and Practices of Libraries in Prisons: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-861-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Tammy Milby

Purpose – The chapter provides the reader with an overview of how teacher preparation programs can utilize a school-based reading/literacy clinic model within university…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter provides the reader with an overview of how teacher preparation programs can utilize a school-based reading/literacy clinic model within university coursework. Information on how to successfully scaffold teacher candidates into becoming more reflective educators through the use of a reading clinic model is provided. Details for partnering with community organizations to provide tutoring support for struggling readers is illustrated.

Methodology/approach – The research support for utilizing tutoring programs is shared. Implications for teacher preparation programs seeking to develop literacy experiences for preservice and practicing educators are depicted. This book chapter describes a framework for establishing and maintaining tutoring partnerships within communities.

Practical implications – The author provides examples of effective community partnerships with suggestions and techniques for developing new programs and/or partnerships. Practical tips for establishing and maintaining tutoring programs which are composed of innovative practices are included.

Social implications – The key element of effective tutoring programs is to improve student achievement in literacy. Educators must build meaningful and thought-provoking literacy practices into the tutoring setting. A model for using a tutoring approach supportive of struggling readers is described. The components for effectively designing and preserving a reading clinics program are shared.

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Audhesh K. Paswan and Gopala Ganesh

Services are inherently intangible, and high on experience as well as credence quality. To promote services effectively, a service provider must go beyond mere creation of…

1416

Abstract

Services are inherently intangible, and high on experience as well as credence quality. To promote services effectively, a service provider must go beyond mere creation of awareness. There is a need to induce trial so that consumers are able to assess the experience and credence qualities. In addition, the notion of timing in the consumption process also plays a key role, i.e. pertinent information about the service at the appropriate time. These issues are empirically investigated in a higher educational setting, with a focus on learning augmentation services. The results indicate that although consumer interest increases with awareness, the increase in interest is even higher when awareness is coupled with trial. This study also indicates that interest in a service is a function of timing in the overall service consumption cycle. Finally, interest in service items offered is positively associated with the overall interest in the service provider. Promotion planners and brand managers need to take these into account for an efficient and effective promotional plan.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Stephanie Al Otaiba, Carol MacDonald Connor, Barbara Foorman, Luana Greulich and Jessica S. Folsom

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe a synergistic “hybrid” model of Response to Intervention (RtI) that combines individualized effective Tier 1 classroom…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this chapter is to describe a synergistic “hybrid” model of Response to Intervention (RtI) that combines individualized effective Tier 1 classroom instruction with powerful early intervening services. First, we provide an overview and explain how RtI traditionally has been conceptualized. Next, we illustrate how to implement a hybrid model that focuses on beginning reading instruction and also incorporates additional school-level resources. Finally, we will discuss implementation issues related to identifying children who need additional intervention and propose directions for future research.

Details

Policy and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-311-8

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2008

Nick Axford, Louise Morpeth, Michael Little and Vashti Berry

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are acknowledged to provide the most reliable estimate of programme effectiveness, yet relatively few are undertaken in children's…

Abstract

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are acknowledged to provide the most reliable estimate of programme effectiveness, yet relatively few are undertaken in children's services. Consequently, there are few models with a demonstrated impact on child well‐being, leading to a concern not only that services may frequently be ineffective but also that some may be harmful. This article considers how this state of affairs has come into being and discusses potential remedies for improving both the knowledge base and the quality of interventions. It focuses on ‘operating systems’ that link prevention science and community engagement and so help communities, agencies and local authorities to choose effective prevention, early intervention and treatment models. Specifically, it describes an attempt in Ireland to implement a robust programme of research into children's health and development, to rigorously design new services, evaluate their impact to the highest standard (using RCTs)and integrate the results into the policy process. Based on the authors' extensive first‐hand experience of supporting the work, and the advice of international experts, the article reflects critically on the unforeseen challenges and offers lessons for others starting a similar enterprise.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Megan Adams and Sanjuana Rodriguez

Public schools are spaces where capital-T transformation in teachers is needed (Guillory, 2012). To shift schools to places where all communities are valued, teacher…

Abstract

Purpose

Public schools are spaces where capital-T transformation in teachers is needed (Guillory, 2012). To shift schools to places where all communities are valued, teacher education programs must create spaces where shifts in beliefs and practice can occur. This study aims to describe how the use of a social justice curriculum framework impacted teacher candidates by creating such a space.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an ethnographic study. Qualitative ethnography is appropriate when “the study of a group provides an understanding of a larger issue” (Creswell, 2015, p. 466). In this case, studying the impact of a social justice framework on the children and teacher candidates in the program allows the researchers to capture the relationships developed during the course of the program and study.

Findings

The framework created valuable experiences for both teacher candidates and elementary age participants. Data were collected to determine the impact of the program on all participants. The authors discuss implications for practitioners planning a social justice curriculum and for teacher educators planning field experiences for teacher candidates.

Research limitations/implications

The need for shifting beyond culturally relevant pedagogy has been well documented in the field (Cho, 2017; Guillory, 2012; Paris, 2012). Moving toward – culturally sustaining pedagogy, multicultural social justice curriculum, critically conscious teachers – must be a priority in teacher education (Banks, 2013; Convertino, 2016). This has been explored in other studies, particularly in studies of merging – or emphasizing – multicultural and social justice education and curricula (Cho, 2017; Lawyer, 2018; Sleeter, 2018). What sets this study apart, and what needs further exploration diverse, is how to set up multicultural social justice education projects involving culturally and economically teacher education candidates and students working together (Cammarota, 2016; Lawyer, 2018; Valenzuela, 2016).

Originality/value

The questions that arise from this study make it new in the field. These include how to set up these diverse field experiences, including how to increase recruitment and retention of culturally and economically marginalized students in teacher education programs (Cammarota, 2016; Castaneda, Kambutu and Rios, 2006). These are important questions to consider in designing research and recruitment projects in colleges of teacher education. Exploring how to push multicultural education into multicultural social justice education deserves additional attention and exploration (Cammarota, 2016; Lawyer, 2018; Sleeter, 2018; Valenzuela, 2016).

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

L. David Weller

Argues that the quest for quality is international in scope, with many nations adopting the total quality management (TQM) principles as a way of achieving educational…

1586

Abstract

Argues that the quest for quality is international in scope, with many nations adopting the total quality management (TQM) principles as a way of achieving educational reform. Early indicators of TQM’s success are increases in student achievement, student self‐concept and teacher morale. However, quality programmes are not free and the concept of accountability is ever‐present in the minds of stakeholders who demand positive returns on their investments. Without a means to demonstrate successful returns on quality investments, public support and confidence in the schools may drastically decrease and TQM may be perceived as too expensive for public support. For those implementing TQM, the question is: how do I demonstrate the return on quality investments? The answer lies in measurement. This involves assessing customer need and expectations; producing quality outputs which meet or exceed customer satisfaction, and then documenting these returns by directly linking quality education outputs with the inputs of time, money, and effort.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Sherri Sheinfeld Gorin and Patrick McAuliffe

The aims of this paper are to: briefly review the long‐term or late effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment on children and youth; examine the implications of these…

2880

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper are to: briefly review the long‐term or late effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment on children and youth; examine the implications of these effects on the educational needs of the child or youth; explore the implications of childhood cancer survivorship on the school, particularly for female students. Over the last 25 years, treatments for childhood cancers have increased survival rates by 45 per cent, to nearly 77 per cent. It is estimated that one in 900 people aged 15‐44 years in the USA is a childhood cancer survivor; 80 per cent of children diagnosed with cancer in 1990 will survive into adulthood.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review of studies relevant to female childhood cancer survivorship and education over the past ten years was conducted, having been collected through searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, and EMBASE.

Findings

Long‐term and late effects of cancer have been observed in neurocognition, cardiopulmonary symptoms, second cancers, reproductive organs, and hearing loss. Other health effects, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, hepatitis C infection, oral and dental malformations, and behavioral risk factors such as fatigue, obesity, and smoking have also been reported among childhood cancer survivors. These longer‐term treatment sequelae, particularly on neurological systems, have implications for changed student educational needs, including the provision of specialized instruction, classroom adaptations, as well as ancillary health services.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the ecologic model, a research agenda is proposed for better integrating the increasing numbers of childhood cancer survivors into the educational environment.

Practical implications

Practical interventions for survivors who are experiencing difficulties in school are listed.

Originality/value

To the best of one's knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review on the implications of childhood cancer survivors in schools.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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