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Article

Innocent Akhuemonkhan, Lukman Raimi, Ashok M Patel and Adeniyi O. Fadipe

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology incubation centre (TIC) is one of the potent mechanisms that launched the “BRIC nations” – Brazil, Russia, India and China – to global prominence as the five biggest emerging economies. This paper attempts to unveil the potentials of TICs as novel tools for entrepreneurship development and actualisation of the Vision 20:2020 in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt analytical and discursive approaches using qualitative and quantitative data sourced from Industrial policy documents, Goldman Sachs report, online databases of government agencies, Vision 20:2020 policy document and published articles on the subject matter. The generated data were subjected to content and thematic analyses, on the basis of which relevant conclusions were drawn.

Findings

The findings from the research indicate that there are 37 TICs in Nigeria with very weak socio-economic impact on job creation, wealth creation and industrial development in Nigeria. However, for the BRIC nations, adopted as comparative models, TICs have impacted positively on job creation, wealth creation and economic development of the five nations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is essentially discursive and subjective. Further research on this subject matter should explore empirical analysis for an objective assessment of the situation.

Practical implications

This paper underscores the need for harmonisation of policy objectives with policy implementation. At present, there are gaps between TIC policy objectives and woeful performance of the 37 TICs in Nigeria.

Social implications

For Nigeria, to enhance job creation, wealth creation and economic development in the society, there is the need for functional TICs at local, institutional, regional, state and national levels.

Originality/value

The paper unveils the gap between economic theory and practical model implementation in developing economy (Nigeria). It is a major contribution to the functionalist and structuralist debates on why policies fail.

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Article

Michael Oluwaseun Olomu, Moses Clinton Ekperiware and Taiwo Akinlo

This paper systematically reviewed the contributions of the recent Nigerian government agricultural policies and the impacts on the agricultural value chain system in line…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper systematically reviewed the contributions of the recent Nigerian government agricultural policies and the impacts on the agricultural value chain system in line with the structural transformation of the sector and the Nigeria's vision 20:2020. The study also suggest strategies to upgrading various segments of the agricultural value chain and argue that Nigeria's agricultural sector requires huge investments and innovative ideas to increase production and create value addition across the most profitable areas of the value chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors systematically present evidences and data from the Central Bank of Nigeria (the apex monetary authority of Nigeria) and Nigerian Bureau of Statistics (oversees and publishes statistics for Nigeria) to estimate the impact of Government agricultural policies on the value chains system.

Findings

The study discovers that the various recent government policy interventions to tackle the austere challenges in the agricultural sector are yet to yield much significant solution. Given to the dwindling performance of the sector, the Nigerian agricultural value chain is somewhat affected with systemic and services gaps which underpin the market failures (missing markets and weak markets), although the agricultural value chain has the potential of triggering economic growth in a higher scale with a trickle-down effect to other sectors of the Nigerian economy.

Practical implications

Overall, the findings indicate strategies to upgrading the production and processing segments of the agricultural value chain and argues that Nigeria's agricultural sector requires huge investments and innovative ideas to increase production and create value addition across the most profitable areas of the value chain.

Social implications

The study proves that enhancing value addition in the agricultural sector is imperative to achieving triple-benefits of increasing productivity by building resilient systems that leverage on finance opportunities, deepening economic inclusive growth and achieving great milestones.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to focus on agricultural value chain system in line with the structural transformation and the Nigeria's vision 20:2020.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

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Article

Vno Aghara, Aham Anyanwu, Ireneus Nwaizugbo, Chudi Okpala and Promise Oparah

Discourses on emerging markets have gained momentum in the literature as companies in slow‐growing developed economies are intensifying their entrepreneurship and search…

Abstract

Discourses on emerging markets have gained momentum in the literature as companies in slow‐growing developed economies are intensifying their entrepreneurship and search for new growth opportunities in emerging economies. Emerging markets are countries that are restructuring their economies along market‐oriented lines and offer a wealth of opportunities in trade, technology transfers and foreign direct investment (FDI). They serve as regional economic powerhouse, reminiscent of transitional societies undertaking political and economic reform, fast growing outward‐oriented economies with efficient production for the domestic and export markets, political economy oriented towards entrepreneurship and free enterprise, market transparency, among others. After decades of economic turmoil, many African countries have started to make steady progress towards creating market‐enabling institution. Based on a synthesis from the literature and using Nigeria as a context, this review paper argues that Nigeria has fallen short of most of the fundamental characteristics necessary to transition to an emerging economy categorization. This means that Nigeria is weakly adapted to the changed view of market‐led development. Although the country is considered a regional economic powerhouse, she is only listed as a “Frontier country” because of weak critical institutional characteristics, more evident in areas such as infrastructural development; privatization of state owned enterprises (SOEs); outward orientation; political and economic reforms and market transparency. The paper concludes, by arguing that for Nigeria to ascend a higher grade in the emerging market taxonomy, some important institutional refinements are necessary. These include: macro‐economic reform and development to drive exports; improved infrastructure, especially power supply; serious political reforms to ensure credible political leadership; and disciplined and ethical revolution to ensure credible corporate governance in both the private and public sectors of the economy.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article

Brendan E. Asogwa

Nigeria has set up an e‐government initiative termed the “National e‐Government Strategy” (NeGSt) for the purpose of using ICT infrastructure to enhance public services…

Abstract

Purpose

Nigeria has set up an e‐government initiative termed the “National e‐Government Strategy” (NeGSt) for the purpose of using ICT infrastructure to enhance public services. It was expected that e‐government would enable the Nigerian government at all levels to render efficiencies in the public sector, ensure higher productivity and economic growth, foster national competitiveness and lead to the attainment of the vision 202020. Regrettably, the e‐services envisaged seem not to be impacting much on public service delivery in the country. The aim of this paper is to examine the benefits and the status of e‐government in Nigeria, the barriers to the accomplishment of the goal, and some ways out.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of ten federal government ministries in Nigeria that have an official website were sampled. The study population was 100 randomly drawn employees in the ministries, and a structured questionnaire and oral interviews were used. Data were analyzed using frequency tables, simple percentages, and bar charts.

Findings

The study finds that e‐government would provide faster access to government information, lower administrative costs, increase transparency in government ministries, and reduce bribery and corruption, among others. These opportunities are threatened by low bandwidth and internet penetration, inadequate ICT infrastructure and technicians, incessant power outages, technological obsolescence, and other barriers. The Nigerian government should carry out a SWOT analysis of the e‐government project in the country, strengthen the e‐government infrastructure and ensure steady power supply before embarking on the e‐government project again.

Practical implications

This paper exposes the challenges and strategies for the e‐government initiative in Nigeria. It will help leaders to see areas of weakness and the need to re‐strategize. The paper serves as a beacon for further research and discussion on e‐government and online public services in developing countries.

Originality/value

This paper exposes the challenges and strategies for the e‐government initiative in Nigeria and suggests some measures for e‐government to develop and to improve.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article

Jamilu Abdullahi

Looking at the present Nigeria’s quest to become one of the top 20 economies of the world by the year 2020, the purpose of this paper is to propose that Nigerian public…

Abstract

Purpose

Looking at the present Nigeria’s quest to become one of the top 20 economies of the world by the year 2020, the purpose of this paper is to propose that Nigerian public libraries, as key players in community development, should provide resources and services for the promotion of social welfare sector of the country by introducing relevant key information management and service policies. These strategic policies should include identification of various user groups, deployment of specialized information professionals, provision of adequate financial resources, social welfare information resource development planning, effective information service delivery system, partnership arrangements and adaptation of Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Design/methodology/approach

Essential to this paper is to take into account the importance and relevancy of policies, strategies and procedures of information management and services to Nigerian public libraries.

Findings

There is continuous rising concerns about the current situation of the country’s socio-economic problems and challenges. However, despite the problem of poor and inadequate ICT facilities in Nigerian public libraries, the ICT infrastructure including the internet will significantly enhance the social welfare information service process in these libraries, if fully adopted. Also very important here is that, the libraries should support community awareness programs on local radio stations or local television channels to compliment the collection of materials in the library.

Originality/value

Nigerian public libraries should be seen as places for all; and participants in community activities must therefore provide relevant data and information to social welfare workers for effective policy/decision making. It is also important that the libraries should help in the identification of areas of welfare that require urgent attention or thorough investigation, examination and analysis.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article

Lukman Raimi, Innocent Akhuemonkhan and Olakunle Dare Ogunjirin

This paper aims to examine the prospect of utilising corporate social responsibility and entrepreneurship (CSRE) as antidotes for mitigating the incidences of poverty…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the prospect of utilising corporate social responsibility and entrepreneurship (CSRE) as antidotes for mitigating the incidences of poverty, insecurity and underdevelopment in Nigeria. The paper derives its theoretical foundation from the stakeholder, instrumental and legitimacy theories, which all justify the use of CSRE for actualisation of Triple Bottom Line (i.e. the social, economic and environmental concerns of business organisations).

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the quantitative research method relying on the use of secondary data published by institutional bodies. The quantitative method entail a systematic extraction of reliable data on corporate social responsibility (CSR), insecurity, poverty and development from the publications of Office of the Millennium Development Goals in Nigeria, CLEEN Foundation, National Bureau of Statistics and Central Bank of Nigeria, respectively. For missing years, the authors improvised using projections as well as proxies. The extracted data, which spanned a period of 13 years, were subjected to econometric tests using SPSS, on the basis of which informed conclusions were drawn.

Findings

The first econometric result indicates a negative relationship between gross domestic product and poverty. The second result indicates that there is a positive significant relationship between gross domestic product and total crime rate. The third result indicates that there exists a positive relationship between gross domestic product and unemployment rate. The fourth result indicates that there is a negative relationship between gross domestic product and industrial growth rate. The last result indicates that there is a significant positive relationship between gross domestic product and CSR.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research have macro-level application, hence the outcomes cannot be narrowed to any particular sector of the economy. A micro-level analysis across diverse sectors of the economy is recommended in future studies. The implication of this empirical research is that policymakers in the Nigerian private sector need to reinvent their CSR programmes as mechanisms for poverty eradication, entrepreneurship development (CSRE), dousing tension of restive youth, empowerment/support for security agencies for better crime prevention and for impacting on sustainable development.

Practical implications

In the face of dwindling financial resources in the treasury of governments, the reinvention of CSRE by private sector organisations as complementary mechanisms for combating social problems is becoming acceptable in both developed and developing nations. This paper therefore boldly recommends that policymakers reinvent CSRE as development mechanisms through a sound partnership between government, advocacy groups and business corporations in Nigeria.

Social implications

The paper explicates that CSR can indeed be reinvented by corporations as part of their social concerns to their operating environment instead of leaving all social problems to governments.

Originality/value

The research lends credence to stakeholder, instrumental and legitimacy theories of CSR. It also justifies the plausibility of CSRE, a novel concept being promoted in this research.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

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Book part

Osikhuemhe O. Okwilagwe

Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) continue to gain increased attention from the Nigerian government. However, since PPP adoption in the country not all have attained…

Abstract

Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) continue to gain increased attention from the Nigerian government. However, since PPP adoption in the country not all have attained expected outcomes. The purpose of this chapter is to explore PPP implementation practices and implications on contractual expectations of partner organizations. A qualitative approach using data collected from 23 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders involved in a Road Partnership and in a Transport Partnership in Nigeria was employed. Documentary evidence was also collected. The institutional nature of the PPP environment; bureaucratic practices in government institutions; disruptive actions of external actors and ineffective mitigation of project risks were main challenges faced in the implementation of the Road and Transport Partnerships. This study is based on the opinions and experiences of key stakeholders on PPP implementation practices in Nigeria, and this is most appropriate to elicit data richness. Partner organizations involved in infrastructure PPPs have the obligation to ensure that they are effectively implemented. If partnerships are poorly implemented, there is no reason to expect that the partnership objectives will be achieved, and this is likely to have a negative impact on the collaborative nature of partnership working in fulfilling the contractual obligations. This study is imperative to provide an understanding of challenges inherent in achieving partnership implementation goals in a developing economy. Findings will inform practices within the PPP policy area in the Nigerian context.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Article

Dotun Adebanjo, Francis Ojadi, Tritos Laosirihongthong and Matthew Tickle

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of supplier selection activities in a service sector organisation in Nigeria. It aims to examine the role of normative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of supplier selection activities in a service sector organisation in Nigeria. It aims to examine the role of normative forces within the context of Institutional Theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study approach was used. Action research utilising participant observation was used in data collection. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS.

Findings

Criteria relating to corporate social responsibility (CSR) proved to be a significant weakness for Nigerian suppliers, as most of the bidding organisations were unable to show evidence of, for example, payment of taxes and insurance for their employees. However, suppliers of services, in general, performed better than suppliers of products.

Practical implications

Suppliers of products and services in Nigeria need to improve their performance with respect to CSR in particular. As most of these organisations are small businesses, they had previously tended to avoid the costs related to CSR implementation. Furthermore, large customer organisations can utilise their buying power and influence to encourage their suppliers to change their corporate strategies and practices.

Originality/value

The selection of suppliers within the study context has previously not been examined. There has been little understanding of the capabilities of suppliers of minor products and services, particularly in relation to fulfilling CSR obligations.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Book part

Ane Turner Johnson

Higher education institutions around the world have increasingly come to see information and communication technology (ICT) as vital to the business of teaching and…

Abstract

Higher education institutions around the world have increasingly come to see information and communication technology (ICT) as vital to the business of teaching and learning. Institutions invest a considerable amount of time and resources to erecting the appropriate institutional infrastructure, creating policy and practice, instituting strategy, training faculty, and building the capacity of technology staff. However, in under-resourced regions of the world, such as Africa, ICT, the availability and use of, has several challenges to overcome: a lack of institutional infrastructure, sufficient bandwidth, and limited capacity to employ ICT in the research process or the classroom. Universities report inadequate funding, poor management and infrastructure, resistance to change, inadequate training, and high costs associated with effective ICT use. Moreover, critiques of Western technopositivism surface misgivings related to the performance outcomes and appropriateness of ICT adoption in Africa. In this chapter, the author will explore the work of international organizations and regional and national research and education networks in the diffusion of ICT discourse, consider on-the-ground adoptions and innovation at universities in Nigeria, and reflect on the suitability and sustainability of technology adoption, all within an ICT for development (ICT4D) framework that lenses the evolution of technological applications in higher education. This chapter is significant in that it connects African higher education to ICT4D and frames the various discourses, policy landscapes and practice arenas, as they relate to international actors, continental initiatives, networks, universities, and faculty.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

Keywords

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