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Article

Mohamed Asmy Mohd Thas Thaker, Md Fouad Amin, Hassanudin Mohd Thas Thaker, Ahmad Khaliq and Anwar Allah Pitchay

The present paper aims to propose a viable alternative model for human capital development (HCD), termed as the integrated cash waqf micro enterprises investment (ICWME-I…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to propose a viable alternative model for human capital development (HCD), termed as the integrated cash waqf micro enterprises investment (ICWME-I) model, which is expected to contribute to the development of micro enterprises in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper for the development of the ICWME-I model. It is purely qualitative in nature, using content analysis. It comprehensively reviews the literature related to HCD issues faced by micro enterprises and existing studies related to cash waqf (Islamic endowment) to construct the ICWME-I model.

Findings

The proposed ICWME-I model is specially designed for HCD of micro enterprises. It is an appropriate initiative to upgrade micro enterprises through HCD programmes by ensuring proper utilization of cash waqf funds to build modern training centres at subsidized costs with state-of-the-art facilities. The training centres would subsidize the participation fees of micro enterprises and provide them with facilities to undertake education and training programmes, as well as other kinds of activities for upgrading, improving and enhancing human capital capacity and skills of micro enterprises. The potential challenges of the ICWME-I model are also highlighted in this study.

Research limitations/implications

This paper attempts to construct the ICWME-I model based on an extensive review of literature related to micro enterprises, cash waqf and HCD. Among its major limitations is the fact that the ICWME-I model is not empirically validated and tested in this research. This can be carried out in future studies.

Practical implications

The present study could have an enormous impact on micro entrepreneurs via HCD programmes. The most important impact would be on government budgets, as this ICWME-I model is expected to generate its own funds from cash waqf for micro enterprises’ HCD.

Originality/value

This paper brings forward an original and viable model to develop human capital for micro enterprises development. This model involves the building of training centres using cash waqf raised from donors.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Shaping Social Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-251-0

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Article

Joost Willem Backer

This paper aims to provide a qualitative country case study of The Netherlands, adopting the macro-institutional social enterprise (MISE) framework as developed by Kerlin…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a qualitative country case study of The Netherlands, adopting the macro-institutional social enterprise (MISE) framework as developed by Kerlin (2009, 2013, 2017). The research question is twofold: How does the institutional context shape the social enterprise country model in The Netherlands, and To what extent can the MISE framework be a useful tool in explaining this dynamic between the institutional context and social enterprise country model?

Design/methodology/approach

This research applies the MISE framework developed by Kerlin (2017), which is founded upon the historical institutionalist approach.

Findings

The analysis of the institutional context in The Netherlands shows that the country context shares most traits with the autonomous diverse model. Its institutional environment should however be more enabling for the development of social enterprises. This discrepancy is explained through the notion of political will, resulting in the suggestion that the historical institutionalist approach of the MISE framework could be expanded by a greater focus on political will.

Research limitations/implications

To investigate the Dutch social enterprise country model, this paper principally relies on external sources, including surveys (McKinsey, 2016; PwC, 2016; Social Enterprise NL, 2015; 2016; 2018). This is problematic due to its subjective nature, small population size used and potential conceptual misfit with the definitions used in this research.

Practical implications

For academia, this paper enhances the understanding of the relations between the institutional environment and social enterprise by adding a case study of The Netherlands to the body of research around the MISE framework. Furthermore, the paper suggests to enhance the historical institutionalist approach of the MISE framework with a greater focus on political will. For advocates of social enterprises in The Netherlands, including policymakers, this paper may add to their understanding of the current developments around social enterprise in The Netherlands and possibly enhance their effectiveness of advocating for policies that are conducive to the development of social enterprises.

Originality/value

This research is the first in applying a universally applicable theoretical framework to the context of The Netherlands. For scholars of social enterprise in The Netherlands, it provides a comprehensive overview of developments of social enterprise in the country over recent years, as well as a thorough analysis of the current state of affairs. For international scholars of social enterprise, this research provides a case of comparison with other countries, taking into account all main institutions that shape a country and social enterprise in that country. For scholars of the MISE framework, this research offers an additional country case study that further helps improve the framework.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article

Robert Smith

Socio‐economic decline in rural areas is a pervasive and debilitating phenomenon in terms of regional development, particularly when former models of economic growth which…

Abstract

Purpose

Socio‐economic decline in rural areas is a pervasive and debilitating phenomenon in terms of regional development, particularly when former models of economic growth which once stimulated business generation and regeneration can no longer be counted on to do so. In these austere times, models of social and community enterprise are becoming more important. This corresponds to the emergence of theories of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise as explanatory variables. Such theories are used to label enterprising behaviour enacted within our communities, even when the theoretical arguments underpinning these re‐conceptualisations require to be stretched to permit this. Often the resultant explanations are not entirely convincing. The purpose of this paper is to challenge existing conceptualisations of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study methodology, the paper reports on the activities of the Buchan Development Partnership (BDP) – a community‐based project situated in the Buchan area of Aberdeenshire, Scotland – demonstrating how individual and community enterprise can be utilized to develop enterprising individuals and communities by growing enterprises organically. The case articulates this process, as it occurred in a rural development partnership using a narrative‐based case study methodology to examine activities and growth strategies.

Findings

The case bridges issues of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial process, community and regional development and tells a story of community regeneration through the process of “Community Animateurship”.

Research limitations/implications

Research, practical and social implications are discussed but in particular the need to adopt a more holistic “bottom up” approach.

Originality/value

This case challenges existing conceptualisations of community‐based entrepreneurship and social enterprise.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article

Christine Nielsen and Patricia M. Samia

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive perspective on social enterprise development, leading to enhanced understanding of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive perspective on social enterprise development, leading to enhanced understanding of the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

General systems theory is applied to case studies drawn from the Philippines, enabling the authors delineate system actors and their interrelationships, system objectives and strategies, key success factors and outcomes.

Findings

The BOP social enterprise development process can be modeled from a systems perspective. The resulting model provides valuable information to marketing managers and others.

Research limitations/implications

Model development would be enhanced by its adaptation to a broader range of cases, including those involving large national corporations and MNCs in the Philippines and elsewhere.

Practical Implications

Three major implications for marketing managers and others who aspire to serving the BOP marketplace are revealed: BOP consumers and producers are intertwined; there is much to be learned from BOP entrepreneurs who have developed innovative product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies for BOP consumers; and cooperation with local businesses, government agencies, NGOs and cooperatives can increase the likelihood of success in the BOP marketplace.

Originality/value

While previous authors have suggested that it is important to understand the complex system in which social enterprise development takes place, little work has been done to fully describe such a system. This study develops the most comprehensive model of the social enterprise development process to date.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article

Kaizhong Yang and Ying Xu

This study aims to test the relationship between city industrial diversity and enterprises development in an urban region, in order to investigate the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the relationship between city industrial diversity and enterprises development in an urban region, in order to investigate the effect of diversified urban environment on the development of urban enterprises and its changing trends.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a quantitative approach and the data are from a data bank of industrial censuses which contains data of all firms in Beijing for three years. All data concerning diversities were counted.

Findings

The main findings of this research are that industrial differences in entrepreneurship activities were mainly related to industrial diversities. Different from the relationship of development of regional enterprises based on the development of regional economy growth, the enterprises development of different industries lies in the intra‐ and inter‐industrial diversities.

Practical implications

Intra‐ and inter‐industrial diversities can contribute to entrepreneurship activities in a region. It is therefore argued that one of the effective ways to boost entrepreneurship is to advance the industrial diversities of a region.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is two‐fold. A modified conceptual framework is proposed to test the relationship between entrepreneurship and diversified industrial structure; it is the first empirical study concerning regional industrial diversities and enterprises in China.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Shaping Social Enterprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-251-0

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Article

Emmanuel Raufflet, Alain Berranger and Jean‐François Gouin

Over the last decade, several innovative business‐community partnerships have emerged to address simultaneously two pressing development issues: poverty reduction and

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last decade, several innovative business‐community partnerships have emerged to address simultaneously two pressing development issues: poverty reduction and biodiversity conservation. The purpose of this paper is to identify relevant models and to propose a first evaluation of these models in relation to development.

Design/methodology/approach

The models were identified following a literature review and were evaluated using Amartya Sen's definition of poverty.

Findings

The paper identifies two models: the local enterprise model and the global investment model. While the local model relies mainly on local resources, the global investment model includes local and global organizations and institutions. The paper has analyzed the respective impacts of these new business‐community partnerships, including their governance schemes, on communities and ecosystems through the lens of Amartya Sen's definition of poverty and development. The key finding is double. First, both these models are still in their very early stages. Second, the paper has identified the strengths and weaknesses of each of these models: while the global investment model provides access to solid and important financial resources and markets, the local enterprise model emphasizes local empowerment.

Originality/value

This paper reports innovative initiatives and models of governance that could inspire future private sector based approaches to biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction and help build the theoretical bases for such approaches.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article

Innocent Akhuemonkhan, Lukman Raimi, Ashok M Patel and Adeniyi O. Fadipe

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship development in Nigeria requires the adoption and assimilation of enterprise development models from nations with replicable success stories. Technology incubation centre (TIC) is one of the potent mechanisms that launched the “BRIC nations” – Brazil, Russia, India and China – to global prominence as the five biggest emerging economies. This paper attempts to unveil the potentials of TICs as novel tools for entrepreneurship development and actualisation of the Vision 20:2020 in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt analytical and discursive approaches using qualitative and quantitative data sourced from Industrial policy documents, Goldman Sachs report, online databases of government agencies, Vision 20:2020 policy document and published articles on the subject matter. The generated data were subjected to content and thematic analyses, on the basis of which relevant conclusions were drawn.

Findings

The findings from the research indicate that there are 37 TICs in Nigeria with very weak socio-economic impact on job creation, wealth creation and industrial development in Nigeria. However, for the BRIC nations, adopted as comparative models, TICs have impacted positively on job creation, wealth creation and economic development of the five nations.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is essentially discursive and subjective. Further research on this subject matter should explore empirical analysis for an objective assessment of the situation.

Practical implications

This paper underscores the need for harmonisation of policy objectives with policy implementation. At present, there are gaps between TIC policy objectives and woeful performance of the 37 TICs in Nigeria.

Social implications

For Nigeria, to enhance job creation, wealth creation and economic development in the society, there is the need for functional TICs at local, institutional, regional, state and national levels.

Originality/value

The paper unveils the gap between economic theory and practical model implementation in developing economy (Nigeria). It is a major contribution to the functionalist and structuralist debates on why policies fail.

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Article

Ingrid Verwey

This paper reviews how women help women in the South African Women in Construction (SAWIC) organization to effectively participate in projects. In a pilot project…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews how women help women in the South African Women in Construction (SAWIC) organization to effectively participate in projects. In a pilot project partnering with industry stakeholders, the Development Bank of Southern Africa as incubator of SAWIC, further explored what support women contractors required to succeed, tested mentoring and coaching as part of enterprise development.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature were studied and analysed, testing the views and measure of success of women contractors against existing models. A survey instrument was developed to test the constructs empirically.

Findings

The empirical testing of success as a construct indicated that women overwhelmingly view mentoring and coaching as key capacity building and growth strategies towards successful women‐owned construction enterprises, underpinned by preliminary indications of the almost complete pilot study.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation to the study is that it is based on preliminary findings and limited scope of the civil project.

Practical implications

Given the excellent results of the Cronbach α and factor analysis, the instrument developed proved to be reliable and valid and could be used for similar studies.

Originality/value

Knowledge sharing of lessons learnt in the joint initiative between government, the building industry, development finance institutions and women associations towards addressing critical skills shortages and gender equity.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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