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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Aseem Kinra and Imoh Antai

The purpose of this paper is to elicit the subtle but progressive shift in organizational/institutional interaction with its rivals within a competitive framework, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elicit the subtle but progressive shift in organizational/institutional interaction with its rivals within a competitive framework, and thereby discusses and analyses paradigm shifts in competition and competitiveness. The paper argues that interorganizational networks and the recent concept of supply chain management may have induced a change in how competitiveness is viewed at the national, industry, and firm levels of interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conceptualizes extant literature into distinct themes of (organizational and institutional) analysis – micro, macro, and meso – and based on this review the paper seeks to identify emerging logics and shifts within mainstream competitiveness literature over the last decade.

Findings

The paper suggests that the micro‐macro theme of competition and competitiveness remains dominant in mainstream literature. Results from the analysis also support the notion of emergent logics of competition and competitiveness, which could then imply that a paradigm shift may well have begun within the area of competition and competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The limited findings point towards more detailed forays into competition of interorganizational forms such as networks and supply chains, before a paradigm shift may be claimed.

Practical implications

The paper serves to trigger the consciousness of stakeholders to think realistically with regards to claims that competition and competitiveness are carried out on the network level, e.g. a supply chain vs supply chain playing field.

Originality/value

While networks and supply chains have generally been inferred as new frontiers for contemporary competition in different functionally‐oriented literature domains, analysis and performance of such emergent logics is yet to be shown. The classification of different competition logics put forth in this paper aid in systemizing the competitiveness/competition rhetoric.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Tom H. Brown

This paper seeks to discuss past and present paradigm shifts in education and then to explore possible future learning paradigms in the light of the knowledge explosion in

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss past and present paradigm shifts in education and then to explore possible future learning paradigms in the light of the knowledge explosion in the knowledge era that is currently being entered.

Design/methodology/approach

New learning paradigms and paradigm shifts are explored.

Findings

Learning processes and learning paradigms are still very much founded in a content‐driven and knowledge production paradigm. The rapid developments in information and communication technologies already have and will continue to have a profound impact on information processing, knowledge production and learning paradigms. One needs to acknowledge the increasing role and impact of technology on education and training. One has already experienced enormous challenges in coping with the current overflow of available information. It is difficult to imagine what it will be like when the knowledge economy is in its prime.

Practical implications

Institutions should move away from providing content per se to learners. It is necessary to focus on how to enable learners to find, identify, manipulate and evaluate information and knowledge, to integrate this knowledge in their world of work and life, to solve problems and to communicate this knowledge to others. Teachers and trainers should become coaches and mentors within the knowledge era – the source of how to navigate in the ocean of available information and knowledge – and learners should acquire navigating skills for a navigationist learning paradigm.

Originality/value

This paper stimulates out‐of‐the‐box thinking about current learning paradigms and educational and training practices. It provides a basis to identify the impact of the new knowledge economy on the way one deals with information and knowledge and how one deals with learning content and content production. It emphasizes that the focus should not be on the creation of knowledge per se, but on how to navigate in the ocean of available knowledge and information. It urges readers to anticipate the on future and to explore alternative and appropriate learning paradigms.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Sylvia Rohlfer and Yingying Zhang

This paper aims to unfold the path of how the complexity of culture issues leads to a rising pressure for paradigm changes in the research on culture in international…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to unfold the path of how the complexity of culture issues leads to a rising pressure for paradigm changes in the research on culture in international management. In terms of academic debate about culture, the crucial paradigm shift has not yet happened. Research and writing are still dominated by a mechanistic-rational approach which does not quite know to handle cultural phenomena which by nature are mutuable, often transient and invariably context-specific. Rising pressure is observed for paradigm changes through three main trends: integration of West-East dichotomy, coexistence of convergence and divergence; and dynamic vs static perspectives. It is argued that the unresolved debate on the culture construct and its measurement, the epistemological stance by researchers and associated methodological choices in culture studies reinforce these trends pressuring for a paradigm shift.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the knowledge based on culture studies to establish the contributions of culture studies in international business and the foundation of its knowledge base. The conceptual foundation of culture, its multi-level and multi-dimensionality and critical issues in research epistemology and methodology are analyzed to discuss emerging trends in the process of an imminent paradigm change.

Findings

By unfolding the nature of abstract and high-order definition of culture, the focus is on deciphering the complex construct and multi-level and multi-dimensionality in measurement, which, in turn, interact with the epistemology of culture researchers and the choice of methodology used to carry out culture studies. Eventually the interaction of the three studied elements drives the proposed three paradigmatic changes in the evolving business environment.

Research limitations/implications

The identified trends in existing culture research keep the importance of culture studies in international business management thriving as we point to their relevance for the envisaged paradigm shift.

Practical implications

The three paradoxes discussed challenge researchers who aim to contribute to the knowledge base of culture in international business. In addition, the debate cannot be ignored by international business managers as culture is a key informal institutional driver that influences international business performance.

Originality/value

The review of the knowledge base on culture studies in management contributes to a better understanding of the envisaged paradigmatic shift of the discipline. The debate on the complexity of culture studies is extended to three tendencies for potential paradigmatic change, with implications discussed to suggest future research.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Lesley J. Moore

This paper aims to focus on examples of the perceived tensions of the healthcare work‐based learners as they experienced paradigm shifts in both practice and education.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on examples of the perceived tensions of the healthcare work‐based learners as they experienced paradigm shifts in both practice and education.

Design/methodology/approach

Examples are drawn from a qualitative study to examine work‐based learning (WBL) workshops in a Dutch healthcare setting, and a developmental project led by an academic to implement a WBL accredited programme across Acute and Primary Care Trusts in a region of England. The paper also supports the argument of Flood and Romm that within complex organisations there is a need to develop “triple loop” learning as opposed to “double loop” learning. A discussion of the tensions which relate to experience and research is presented.

Findings

The paper finds that WBL is not easy, especially in times of rapid change and resistance to new ways of working by some colleagues. Managers, academics, mentors and healthcare learners need opportunities to discuss and interpret experience in order to construct meaning and new knowledge of practice. Key to enabling the development of the work‐based inquirer to cope with change and ethical dilemmas is the commitment of facilitators to inspire learning, support the exploitation of workplace resources and encourage networking within and external to the organisation.

Practical implications

A benefit of the WBL approach is that it engages the learner in problem solving and enhances the skills of inquiry, networking and creativity. It is important for the learner to gain awareness of the ethical knowledge underpinning practice. Tensions can arise as paradigms shift and when boundaries are misinterpeted, and personal and organisational values and beliefs conflict.

Originality/value

While the focus is healthcare the discussion could be relevant and of interest to a wider international audience of WBL practitioners as it considers a topic that is undervalued in workplace learning journals but is a reality of shifting paradigms.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Frances M. Amatucci, Nelson Pizarro and Jay Friedlander

This article proposes that sustainability represents a paradigmatic shift from traditional perspectives in entrepreneurship education. This “call to action” argues that it…

Abstract

This article proposes that sustainability represents a paradigmatic shift from traditional perspectives in entrepreneurship education. This “call to action” argues that it is imperative for entrepreneurship scholars and practitioners to add sustainability to academic curricula and consulting support activities. The evolutionary development of entrepreneurship from the traditional profit-oriented perspective to sustainable entrepreneurship is described. A case study of an academic institution, which has successfully incorporated sustainability principles into its curriculum, is provided.This article is among the first that details the importance of a paradigmatic shift because “business as usual” is no longer effective in the twenty-first century.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

W. Edward Stead and Jean Garner Stead

Economic wealth is humankind′s most dominant myth. However, this mythmust be significantly altered if economic activity and ecologicalsustainability are to be achieved for…

Abstract

Economic wealth is humankind′s most dominant myth. However, this myth must be significantly altered if economic activity and ecological sustainability are to be achieved for posterity. Changing the economic myth means shifting the paradigms which underlie it, and shifting these paradigms means changing the assumptions and values which lie at the heart of business′s relationship to the planet. Research supports the notion that widescale, fundamental change efforts are required to achieve such shifts. Examines the magnitude of the changes which probably will be necessary in order to achieve a truly sustainable society in the future. Discusses the nature of some of the scientific, economic, and management paradigm shifts which need to take place in business organizations before the myth of economic wealth can be truly modified to include Mother Earth.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Ute Jamrozy

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a shift in the tourism marketing paradigm away from economic profit priorities toward sustainability. The sustainability approach…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a shift in the tourism marketing paradigm away from economic profit priorities toward sustainability. The sustainability approach adopts a holistic, integrated view of marketing, considering social equity, environmental protection, and economic livability. The paper seeks to examine the evolving model for the tourism marketing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paradigm shift naturally occurs by tracing the evolution of marketing approaches from production, sales, and a consumer orientation toward marketing alternatives such as societal, causal, green, responsible, and relationship marketing. Adapting a living system theory to tourism marketing, a sustainable tourism marketing model integrates tourism into a larger holistic context and focuses on marketing a quality of life for all stakeholders in the system.

Findings

While alternative approaches to tourism marketing include societal consideration such as tourism impacts and environmental segmentation strategies, this paper considers the triple bottom line as more sustainable objectives in tourism marketing and adopts an integrated view on tourism marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The model suggests a paradigm shift that needs to be explored further.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates how tourism marketing can be integrated into more sustainable urban marketing strategies.

Originality/value

Instead of viewing tourism as a separate for profit industry, the model suggests an integration of tourism into a holistic, sustainable, quality of life marketing approach of living communities.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Bonita L. Betters‐Reed and Lynda L. Moore

Proposes that women will not make significant advances in Americanbusinesses unless the focus shifts from a preoccupation on genderawareness to one of multicultural…

Abstract

Proposes that women will not make significant advances in American businesses unless the focus shifts from a preoccupation on gender awareness to one of multicultural awareness. Discusses the whitewash dilemma and dominant assumptions about women in management to help explain the current management development paradigm that fails to recognize diversity among women. Makes a case for increasing organizational education about racial and gender similarities and differences which are crucial for establishing a successful multicultural organization where a new, all‐inclusive paradigm can prevail and the voices of all women can be heard. An analysis and critique of the women in management field precedes by an emerging model of individual and organizational stages of awareness. Finally proposes recommendations for interventions to shift existing management development practices towards the new paradigm.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Fahri Karakas and Mustafa Kavas

The purpose of this paper is to introduce service‐learning 2.0 model based on four new paradigms in the global business landscape: connectivity, creativity, community, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce service‐learning 2.0 model based on four new paradigms in the global business landscape: connectivity, creativity, community, and complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews four paradigm shifts and their effects on service‐learning practices and methodology: wikinomics and mass collaboration, collective intelligence and open innovation, appreciative inquiry and positive organizational scholarship (POS), and self‐organizing systems and the new sciences.

Findings

Service‐learning 2.0 can be used to develop our students' twenty‐first century thinking skills through applied community engagement projects, namely: interactivity and interconnectedness, innovation and insight, and inspiration and intuition, integrative and interdisciplinary thinking.

Practical implications

Service‐learning 2.0 principles and pedagogy can help students appreciate and prepare for increasing complexity and paradox of management and organizations in the light of global, social and organizational changes of the twenty‐first century.

Originality/value

Service‐learning 2.0 model represents the pedagogy, principles, and processes that are better suited to the global, technological, and social changes and challenges of the 21st century.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2020

Ann-Marie Kennedy, Cathy McGouran and Joya A. Kemper

The authors do not claim that the following represents the views of any one tribe but instead the culmination of the academic literature written on the topic. Marketing’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors do not claim that the following represents the views of any one tribe but instead the culmination of the academic literature written on the topic. Marketing’s current Western dominant social paradigm (DSP) is said to perpetuate “green”, yet unsustainable practices. The DSP does not support strictly pro-environmental practices and its proposed alternative, the new environmental paradigm (NEP), lacks in-depth conceptualisation, especially concerning business and marketing activities. However, the two paradigms contrast so much that a shift from one to the other is vehemently argued against and conceptually rife with problems. This paper aims to expand upon the merits of the NEP using indigenous people’s environmental philosophies – specifically the Māori people of New Zealand[1] – as examples of historically supported and successful sustainable philosophies. It conceptualises the Māori view to provide a more practical alternative to the DSP and includes propositions for marketing implementation of this perspective.

Findings

By explicating both the DSP and NEP and reflecting on each through an indigenous Māori view, this paper provides propositions for a broadened paradigm that supports sustainability and its application for sustainable marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this research are in the area of paradigm development and in providing an alternative paradigm to that of the DSP. This paper is the first to fully explicate parts of the NEP and considers a solution to the problems of changing the current DSP so drastically by broadening the NEP using a Māori worldview.

Practical implications

The propositions and examples provided in this work give practical application of the newly presented paradigm for marketers influenced by indigenous belief systems.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to explicate parts of the NEP and broaden its reach by integrating a Māori worldview as an alternative to drastically changing the current DSP. It does so by proposing that marketers embrace a middle ground that is influenced by indigenous belief systems.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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