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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Vernon Levy B.Sc

64

Abstract

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Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Vernon Levy B.Sc

58

Abstract

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Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Vernon Levy B.Sc

41

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Vernon Levy B.Sc

35

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Vernon Levy B.Sc

23

Abstract

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Electronic Resources Review, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some…

91157

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Mark Casson

This article is concerned with the role of theory in explaining the inter‐industry variation of vertical integration (VI). Why, for example, is the world aluminium industry highly…

Abstract

This article is concerned with the role of theory in explaining the inter‐industry variation of vertical integration (VI). Why, for example, is the world aluminium industry highly integrated (Stukey, 1983) whereas the tin industry is not (Hennart, 1982)? The article is not concerned with explaining differences in the average level of VI across countries, although these are undoubtedly significant (Chandler and Daeins, 1980).

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1951

In a debate in the House of Commons on February 2nd, the following Motion was proposed and agreed : – “That this House is of opinion that further steps should be taken by His…

Abstract

In a debate in the House of Commons on February 2nd, the following Motion was proposed and agreed : – “That this House is of opinion that further steps should be taken by His Majesty’s Government to encourage cleanliness in the preparation and serving of food in retail shops and catering establishments.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1968

ALTHOUGH the first Public Libraries (Scotland) Act was placed on the Statute Book in 1853, it was not until 1899 that the Corporation of the City of Glasgow was empowered to…

Abstract

ALTHOUGH the first Public Libraries (Scotland) Act was placed on the Statute Book in 1853, it was not until 1899 that the Corporation of the City of Glasgow was empowered to establish and maintain public libraries throughout the city. Between 1876 and 1897 four attempts were made to secure public approval for the adoption of the Public Libraries (Scotland) Acts, but when all these efforts proved unsuccessful, the Corporation decided in June, 1888 to include in a Local Bill for submission to Parliament, certain clauses conferring upon themselves the power to become a library authority. Promoted in 1899, the Bill became known as the Glasgow Corporation (Tramways, Libraries, etc.) Act 1899, and the library clauses passed through Parliament without opposition and received Royal Assent on 1st August, 1899. The powers conferred by this Local Act empowered the Corporation:

Details

New Library World, vol. 69 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1901

The Departmental Committee appointed to inquire into the use of preservatives and colouring matters in the preservation and colouring of food, have now issued their report, and…

Abstract

The Departmental Committee appointed to inquire into the use of preservatives and colouring matters in the preservation and colouring of food, have now issued their report, and the large amount of evidence which is recorded therein will be found to be of the greatest interest to those concerned in striving to obtain a pure and unsophisticated food‐supply. It is of course much to be regretted that the Committee could not see their way to recommend the prohibition of all chemical preservatives in articles of food and drink; but, apart from this want of strength, they have made certain recommendations which, if they become law, will greatly improve the character of certain classes of food. It is satisfactory to note that formaldehyde and its preparations may be absolutely prohibited in foods and drinks; but, on the other hand, it is suggested that salicylic acid may be allowed in certain proportions in food, although in all cases its presence is to be declared. The entire prohibition of preservatives in milk would be a step in the right direction, although it is difficult to see why, in view of this recommendation, boric acid should be allowed to the extent of 0·25 per cent. in cream, more especially as by another recommendation all dietetic preparations intended for the use of invalids or infants are to be entirely free from preservative chemicals; but it will be a severe shock to tho3e traders who are in the habit of using these substances to be informed that they must declare the fact of the admixture by a label attached to the containing vessel. The use of boric acid and borax only is to be permitted in butter and margarine, in proportions not exceeding 0·5 per cent. expressed as boric acid, without notification. It is suggested that the use of salts of copper in the so‐called greening of vegetables should not be allowed, but upon this recommendation the members of the Committee were not unanimous, as in a note attached to the report one member states that he does not agree with the entire exclusion of added copper to food, for the strange reason that certain foods may naturally contain traces of copper. With equal truth it can be said that certain foods may naturally contain traces of arsenic. Is the addition of arsenic therefore to be permitted? The Committee are to be congratulated upon the result of their labours, and when these recommendations become law Great Britain may be regarded as having come a little more into line— although with some apparent reluctance—with those countries who regard the purity of their food‐supplies as a matter of national importance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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