Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

A. Kadir Varoğlu, Ünsal Sığrı and Erbil Işın

In this paper we present the findings of a study on the differences or the harmony of Turkish military vs. Turkish national culture. We approached this issue by using…

Abstract

In this paper we present the findings of a study on the differences or the harmony of Turkish military vs. Turkish national culture. We approached this issue by using work-related value orientations. Hofstede's research provided an organisation-based look into national cultural differences and we used his work to evaluate the Turkish national culture and its compatibility with the Turkish military culture. The data about the characteristics of the Turkish military culture are based on observations.

Details

Military Missions and their Implications Reconsidered: The Aftermath of September 11th
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-012-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Serkan Yiğit and Nilüfer Şahin Perçin

The purpose of this study is to examine and understand the experiences of tourists in the Turkish coffee houses in Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine and understand the experiences of tourists in the Turkish coffee houses in Istanbul, Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a qualitative case study method was used to analyze tourists’ comments with user-generated content technique by analyzing tourists’ comments. The data used in the study was collected through TripAdvisor, which is considered one of the most famous websites with tourist reviews and comments, between 20 May and 10 June 2020 from tourists’ reviews (n:219).

Findings

The findings show that Turkish coffee house experiences are heterogeneous based on the dimensions of coffee characteristics, place, satisfaction, recommendation and revisit intention, value/price and value-added experience. Moreover, value-added experience includes some sub-themes such as a memorable experience, authentic experience and culture learning experience.

Originality/value

There are some studies on Turkish coffee and Turkish coffee culture in the literature, but there have been no empirical studies investigating the Turkish coffee house experiences of tourists. For this reason, this study aims to examine and understand the experiences of tourists in Turkish coffee houses. Therefore, it is believed that this study will fill the current gap in the literature on tourists’ experiences of Turkish coffee houses.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Karol P. Kaczorowski

This chapter presents findings of an ongoing project on the social construction of ethnic identity among young Kurdish immigrants living in Turkey. The chapter begins with…

Abstract

This chapter presents findings of an ongoing project on the social construction of ethnic identity among young Kurdish immigrants living in Turkey. The chapter begins with information on Kurdish culture. The second part overviews the difficult relations between the Turkish state and Kurds since establishment of the Republic in 1923. The third section describes the education system in the country and in Istanbul specifically. Historical ties between the Istanbul and Kurdish culture are also mentioned. The chapter closes with research that focuses on problems of Kurdish educational experiences in Turkey and preservation of their cultural identity in Istanbul. The study shows that on the one hand public education is perceived by the Kurds in Turkey as a discriminatory entity but on the other hand nonpublic educational opportunities in Istanbul help Kurdish migrants preserve and practice their cultural identity.

Details

Living in Two Homes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-781-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Huadong Yang and Amna Yousaf

In this paper, the authors examine the role of idiocentric and allocentric cultural orientations in employees’ preference for relationship help and for emotional help from…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors examine the role of idiocentric and allocentric cultural orientations in employees’ preference for relationship help and for emotional help from third parties in two cross-cultural samples. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the psychological dynamics of cultural dimensions in relation to cross-cultural conflict intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the theoretical assumptions by using questionnaire survey in two cross-cultural samples. Study 1 is a cross-cultural comparison within a country, including 83 Dutch employees and 106 Turkish immigrants in the Netherlands. Study 2 is a comparison between countries, including 123 Germany-based German employees and 101 Pakistan-based Pakistani employees.

Findings

The results show that employees’ allocentric orientation, but not idiocentric orientation, explains the differences in preference for relationship help in both the within-country comparison (Study 1: individualistic Dutch culture vs collectivistic Turkish culture) and the between-country comparison (Study 2: individualistic German culture vs collectivistic Pakistani culture). However, only in the between-country comparison (Study 2), the findings reveal that the difference in preference for emotional help between individualistic German culture and collectivistic Pakistani culture is mediated by idiocentric orientation (not by allocentric orientation).

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms that the extent to which disputants’ preference for third-party help regarding social and personal aspects does differ across national cultures, and supports that the argument that social relationship is one of the paramount concerns in conflict handling in the collectivistic cultures. In addition, the study signals an alternative way of conducting two culture comparisons and expands our view on the cultural dimension of individualism-collectivism.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications both for third-party intervention and for managing cultural diversity in the workplace.

Social implications

In general, this study contributes to our understanding on how culture influences conflict handling and provides suggestions for third parties to be culturally adaptive.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that culture plays an important role in determining the extent to which disputants favour relationship help and emotional help from third parties. The research is also valuable in terms of reliability. The authors tested the hypotheses in two cross-cultural samples both within a country and between countries.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Yasin Boylu, Asli D.A. Tasci and William C. Gartner

The purpose of this paper is threefold: measure the differences in importance of cultural values between Turkish hosts and European guests; measure perceived cultural…

Downloads
1397

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: measure the differences in importance of cultural values between Turkish hosts and European guests; measure perceived cultural difference (distance) to see if importance of cultural values are commensurate with cultural distance perception; and identify potential influence of perceived cultural distance on job satisfaction for Turkish service providers (hosts) and trip satisfaction for European consumers (guests).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research was conducted in tourist towns in the Southwest part of Turkey to gather data from Turkish hosts (service providers) and European tourists. Two stepwise regression analyses were conducted to assess the magnitude of the relative impact of several variables on job satisfaction for hosts and trip satisfaction for guests.

Findings

Although results revealed differences in cultural values, cultural distance perception and satisfaction, the stepwise regression analyses did not reveal any influence of perceived cultural distance on satisfaction for either hosts or guests.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study may not apply to all tourism consumption settings since respondents were surveyed in a general tourism setting context rather than limiting them to a certain consumption setting such as a restaurant, a hotel or a cruise ship.

Originality/value

By shedding light on cultural distance and its influence on both demand and supply side aspects, this study addresses a long‐neglected aspect in literature. Although several studies provide discussions on the impact of culture on both service providers' and consumers' attitude and behavior, there is a lack of empirical studies on the relationship between cultural distance and satisfaction.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2009

Ibrahim Duyar, Inayet Aydin and Zeki Pehlivan

The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to investigate whether the embraced national culture was a distinguishing factor of preferred downward influence tactics and…

Abstract

The purpose of this cross-cultural study was to investigate whether the embraced national culture was a distinguishing factor of preferred downward influence tactics and targeted goals by principals of different countries. The participants of the study were the public school principals in Turkey and the United States, two culturally distinct countries. The conceptual framework for the study incorporated the Cultural Dimensions (CDs) of Hofstede and the Profiles of Organizational Influence Strategies (POIS) of Kipnis and Schmidt; two pioneers in their respective fields. The findings of the study supported Hofstede's framework for three of the four dimensions for both countries. By employing a pseudoetic cross-cultural research methodology and a relational causal-comparative research design, the study first tested the reliability and construct validity of POIS (Form S) influence tactics scale, both in the Turkish context and in the public education contexts of the two countries. The findings partially supported the applicability of POIS in both countries by yielding a three-factor model for the Turkish context and a four-factor model for the public education context. The multivariate analyses strongly supported literature in regards to the culture-specific nature of leadership influence practices, and it identified national culture as a significantly distinguishing factor of both Turkish and American principals in their preferred influence tactics. Similarly, national culture was also a significantly distinguishing factor of groups in principals' targeted educational goals.

Details

Educational Leadership: Global Contexts and International Comparisons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-645-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Zhenzhong Ma, Ahmet Erkus and Akif Tabak

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of collectivism on conflict management styles in Turkey and to help conflict management researchers and practitioners…

Downloads
3013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of collectivism on conflict management styles in Turkey and to help conflict management researchers and practitioners better understand conflict and conflict management in an international context.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐administered questionnaires with the ROCI scale were used in this study. Data were collected by surveying 244 managerial employees from both public and private organizations. Factor analysis and regression analysis were then used to explore the relationships between conflict management styles and different aspects of collectivism. Differences in demographic factors were also discussed.

Findings

This study shows Turkish people are more likely to use collaborating style, instead of compromising or avoiding as expected from a collectivistic culture. Further, different aspects of collectivism have different effects on Turkish conflict management styles: the importance of competitive success leads to preferences for competing style; the value of working alone leads to less collaboration; the norms of subordination of personal needs to group interest are positively related to more collaborating and accommodating; and the beliefs of the effects of personal pursuit on group productivity are positively related to more compromising.

Originality/value

While Turkey has become more important in world markets, very few studies have been conducted to explore Turkish conflict management styles. This paper examines the ranking of preferences in conflict management methods in Turkey, as well as the impact of collectivism on different conflict management styles, which extends the understanding of cross‐cultural differences in conflict management.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Making Trade Missions Work: A Best Practice Guide to International Business and Commercial Diplomacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-471-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Ahmet Erkuş and Moshe Banai

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of individualism‐collectivism, trust, and ethical ideology on ethically questionable negotiation tactics, such as…

Downloads
2396

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of individualism‐collectivism, trust, and ethical ideology on ethically questionable negotiation tactics, such as pretending, deceiving and lying, in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires translated from English to Turkish were administered to 400 respondents, of whom 379 fully completed the questionnaires.

Findings

The research empirically corroborated a classification of three groups of negotiation tactics, namely, pretending, deceiving and lying. Turkish negotiators who scored high on horizontal individualism tended to score highly on pretending and deceiving and less on lying, and presented an inverse relationship between scores on those tactics and score on idealism. Trust was not found to be related to any of the negotiation tactics.

Research limitations/implications

The study investigated the respondents' perceptions rather than their actual negotiation behavior. The sample size, though large and inclusive of public and private sector employees, provided limited ability to generalize Turkish negotiator conduct.

Practical implications

The study provides hints to managers negotiating in Turkey of the extent to which Turkish managers would employ ethically questionable negotiation tactics.

Originality/value

This empirical field research is the first to present a model of the antecedents of negotiation tactics in Turkey, a country where negotiation studies are limited and are mostly conducted within the safe controls of the laboratory.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Ufi Cullen

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the impact of social institutions, and, in particular, of national culture, on business success, further considering…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the impact of social institutions, and, in particular, of national culture, on business success, further considering how these institutions influence entrepreneurial decisions around partnership structure and networking strategies, for instance. It additionally examines how the female entrepreneur finds her way around these institutions to help her business succeed, evaluating whether this success is a culture-independent phenomenon that can be achieved through using similar, potentially advantageous strategies regardless of national context or whether adjustments are required before entering a foreign market.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a survey study from 240 established female entrepreneurs with 120 from each country. Two existing surveys were used to create the questions. The target sample group was comprised of successful female businesses within northwest England and western Turkey. These regions were selected due to their convenience and accessibility. Only successful businesses or, in other words, established entrepreneurs were accepted to this study. The business success criteria were: age of business (>5 years); stability or growth recorded on profitability; sales volume; and number of employees within the last financial year.

Findings

The findings showed significant differences between the two groups of established female entrepreneurs in their demographic characteristics, networking pattern, work pattern, business structure and perceived impediments at different stages of business venturing. The findings assert that the cultural dimensions of power distance and individualism have the most significant impact upon the established female entrepreneurs’ business strategies.

Originality/value

To date, limited studies have examined the country-specific factors, which may account for variance in women entrepreneurs’ behaviour and subsequent outcomes. This study attempts to close this gap through taking a closer look at the country-specific sociocultural factors creating differences in established female entrepreneurs’ business strategies within the context of Turkey and the UK. Should any female business strategy have become successful in one country, then policymakers and women support organisations can work on developing ways for benchmarking. Moreover, this study aims to guide female entrepreneurs to develop feasible international market entry strategies to ensure survival in today’s global market.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000