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Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

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Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Michael Calnan and Tom Douglass

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Michael Calnan and Tom Douglass

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Book part
Publication date: 26 May 2015

Yvonne D. Newsome

This study compares filmic and televisual representations of fictional black presidents to white Americans’ reactions to the advent of the United States’s first African American…

Abstract

Purpose

This study compares filmic and televisual representations of fictional black presidents to white Americans’ reactions to the advent of the United States’s first African American president. My main goal is to determine if there is convergence between these mediated representations and whites’ real-world representations of Barack Obama. I then weigh the evidence for media pundits’ speculations that Obama owes his election to positive portrayals of these fictional heads of state.

Methodology/approach

The film and television analyses examine each black president’s social network, personality, character traits, preparation for office, and leadership ability. I then compare the ideological messages conveyed through these portrayals to the messages implicated in white Americans’ discursive and pictorial representations of Barack Obama.

Findings

Both filmic and televisual narratives and public discourses and images construct and portray black presidents with stereotypical character traits and abilities. These representations are overwhelmingly negative and provide no support for the argument that there is a cause–effect relationship between filmic and televisual black presidents and Obama’s election victory.

Research implications

Neither reel nor real-life black presidents can elude the representational quagmire that distorts African Americans’ abilities and diversity. Discourses, iconography, narratives, and other representations that define black presidents through negative tropes imply that blacks are incapable of effective leadership. These hegemonic representations seek to delegitimize black presidents and symbolically return them to subordinate statuses.

Details

Race in the Age of Obama: Part 2
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-982-9

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Michael Calnan and Tom Douglass

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Book part
Publication date: 14 February 2022

Michael Calnan and Tom Douglass

Abstract

Details

Power, Policy and the Pandemic
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-010-8

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Gary L. Lemons

bell hooks says in “Reconstructing Black Masculinity” thatn[c]ollectively we can break the life threatening choke‐holdpatriarchal masculinity imposes on black men and create…

Abstract

bell hooks says in “Reconstructing Black Masculinity” that n[c]ollectively we can break the life threatening choke‐hold patriarchal masculinity imposes on black men and create life sustaining visions of a reconstructed black masculinity that can provide black men ways to save their lives and the lives of their brothers and sisters in struggle. Toward the work of political (re)unification of the genders in black communities today, black men must acknowledge and begin to confront the existence of sexism in black liberation struggle as one of the chief obstacles empeding its advancement. Making womanist space for black men to participate in allied relation to feminist movement to oppose the opression of women means black men going against the grain of the racist and sexist mythology of black manhood and masculinity in the U.S. Its underlying premise rooted in white supremacist patriarchal ideology continues to foster the idea that we pose a racial and sexual threat to American society such that our bodies exist to be feared, brutalized, imprisoned, annihilated‐made invisible.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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