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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Philippa Rasmussen, Tiffany Conroy and Mette Grønkjær

Nurses with specialised knowledge, experience and education are needed to provide specific care in nursing subspecialties such as child and adolescent mental health (CAMH…

Abstract

Purpose

Nurses with specialised knowledge, experience and education are needed to provide specific care in nursing subspecialties such as child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) nursing. However, some of these attributes are implicit and not clear to the wider nursing community. The purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability of a conceptual framework for CAMH inpatient nursing practice to other areas of CAMH nursing practice. This paper presents an exploratory study regarding the applicability of the framework to two small cohorts of CAMH nurses. This study was conducted in Tasmania, Australia and Northern Denmark. These settings were chosen due to the self-perceived knowledge gap surrounding the role and professional identity of these Australian and Danish CAMH nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative study within the social constructivist paradigm was undertaken. The method of data collection was two focus groups of CAMH nurses in Tasmania, Australia and Northern Denmark. The data were analysed using an adaptation of a six-phase thematic analysis process.

Findings

The analysis of the data resulted in three themes: individual preparation and experience of CAMH nurses, knowledge transfer and nurses’ perceptions of their individual and team roles. The findings have contributed new knowledge of CAMH nursing.

Originality/value

The findings of this study may support the applicability of the conceptual framework with participants’ endorsing that it reflects their role.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2023

Tiffany Trzebiatowski

This study aims to incorporate theory on effort-recovery and stressor-detachment models to examine the roles of relaxation, mastery and types of control on the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to incorporate theory on effort-recovery and stressor-detachment models to examine the roles of relaxation, mastery and types of control on the relationship between psychological detachment from work and boundary violations at home.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes data from two time points using a sample of 348 working mothers recruited from Prolific.

Findings

Working moms who psychologically detach from work have less work boundary violations at home. There are mixed findings on whether and when the other types of recovery experiences moderate the relationship between psychological detachment and boundary violations at home. Relaxation, control after work and job autonomy do not moderate the effect while mastery and boundary control do. Specifically, psychological detachment is more effective as reducing boundary violations at home for working moms who have (1) low levels of mastery and (2) high levels of boundary control.

Practical implications

Working mothers juggle multiple roles and often have increased stress and less time to manage the two domains. The findings of this study illustrate whether and when psychological detachment from work acts as a key to recovery from work-based stressors.

Originality/value

Much of the research on recovery experiences is based on employees without consideration of motherhood status. Further, scholars have not examined the combinative potential of recovery experiences. Finally, examining control over both domains (vs. one domain) adds precision to the literature.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Stephanie D. Atkinson and Jiyun Kang

Given the unclear lines between traditional and newly emerged luxury, this research aims to explore which luxury consumption values are important to young consumers (aged 18–44…

6237

Abstract

Purpose

Given the unclear lines between traditional and newly emerged luxury, this research aims to explore which luxury consumption values are important to young consumers (aged 18–44) in the USA and how such new luxury consumption is driven by their personal values. This research thus has two aims. The first is to define new luxury by examining the consumption values that distinguish it from traditional luxury. The second is to examine the personal values that drive these new luxury consumption values, which affect consumers’ intentions to engage with a new luxury brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted. In Study 1, a conceptual framework was developed to define new luxury from the consumption value perspective, based on a comprehensive review of the traditional luxury and emerging or new luxury literature. In Study 2, the framework was further extended to include the driving sources (personal values) and the consequences (intentions to engage with a new luxury brand), which were subsequently examined with empirical model testing. The data were collected via an online survey with consumers recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (n = 318) and examined with exploratory factor analyses and path analyses.

Findings

The results suggest five major new luxury consumption values that help empirically define new luxury, revealing a trend shift in luxury consumption: inconspicuous consumption, self-directed pleasure, intrinsic experiential value, personal fulfillment and sustainability. Among these five values, three (intrinsic experiential value, personal fulfillment and sustainability) were the most significant factors in directly affecting customer intention to engage with a new luxury brand. The results also found five notable personal values driving new luxury consumption: achievement, benevolence, self-direction, self-esteem and ecocentrism.

Originality/value

While new luxury concepts have been explored conceptually and qualitatively in previous studies, there is a lack of empirical research that clearly defines what new luxury is and that offers testable constructs. This study’s empirical framework for new luxury expands the line of investigation into new luxury consumers, brands and products.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Judith Hepner, Jean-Louis Chandon and Damyana Bakardzhieva

Shall luxury firms promote their sustainable development goals (SDGs)? What are the risks and the competitive advantages? Some answers from sustainability-oriented luxury buyers…

3292

Abstract

Purpose

Shall luxury firms promote their sustainable development goals (SDGs)? What are the risks and the competitive advantages? Some answers from sustainability-oriented luxury buyers are provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative analysis from an online survey of 315 luxury buyers in 28 countries.

Findings

Sustainability-oriented luxury buyers want branding strategies aligned with the SDGs and rank SDGs in order of importance for the luxury industry. However, they are unable to rank consistently most brands based on their sustainability efforts. The Stella McCartney brand is a clear exception to the general findings: sustainability-oriented luxury buyers rank Stella the most sustainable luxury brand by a vast margin, show willingness to purchase more from this brand, recommend it and are ready to pay a premium.

Research limitations/implications

The paper uses partial ranking of 20 luxury brands because in pretests, luxury buyers found it difficult to provide a complete ranking of the sustainability efforts of all the brands. Further research in more cultural or geographical contexts is needed.

Originality/value

The research empirically provides an example of a successful marketing strategy leveraging the SDGs to meet sustainability-oriented luxury buyers with targeted actions and messaging to gain competitive advantage.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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