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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Min Wan, Suzanne Zivnuska and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also explored the moderating effect of perceptions of politics on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors administrated time-lagged surveys at two time periods separated by six weeks. Respondents were 206 full-time employees working in the USA. Hierarchical, moderated multiple regression analyzes were used to test the mediation and moderation effects.

Findings

Results showed that mindfulness reduced destructive deviant behavior and unethical pro-organizational behavior through moral disengagement and the mediation effects were weaker when employees’ perceptions of politics were stronger.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that mindfulness and perceptions of organizational politics combine to have profound impacts on employee unethical behaviors. Organizations seeking to minimize the occurrence of deviance and unethical behaviors may do well to support employee mindfulness and as well as minimizing organizational politics. The findings suggest that the political context has a negative impact on even the behavior of mindful employees. Therefore, building mindfulness while simultaneously reducing politics are equally important goals.

Originality/value

Our study extends the theoretical development of mindfulness research by examining the interactive effects of perceptions of organizational politics and mindfulness and broadens the theoretical rationale for explaining the linkages between mindfulness and unethical behaviors.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Kenneth J. Harris, Ranida B. Harris, Matthew Valle, John Carlson, Dawn S. Carlson, Suzanne Zivnuska and Briceön Wiley

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work…

2291

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work domain, work-family conflict in the work-family domain, and family burnout in the family domain. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating role of entitlement, a personality variable, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 253 people who were using technology to complete their work over two time periods, the relationships were examined using hierarchical moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that both techno-overload and techno-invasion were significantly related to greater turnover intentions, higher work-family conflict, and greater family burnout. In addition, entitlement played a moderating role such that those who were higher in entitlement had stronger techno-overload-outcome and technostress invasion-outcome relationships.

Practical implications

These findings may provide managers key insights to help manage employees, especially those with an inflated sense of entitlement, to mitigate the serious negative outcomes associated with techno-overload and techno-invasion. In particular, both techno- overload and techno-invasion had minimal impact on negative outcomes when employee entitlement was lower. However, when employee entitlement was higher, techno-overload and techno-invasion had considerable negative effects.

Originality/value

Due to the ubiquitous nature of information-communication technology (ICT) in organizations today, individuals often experience techno-overload and techno-invasion. This research utilized conservation of resources theory to examine these relationships. This study established the relationships of both techno-overload and techno-invasion with key organizational and family outcomes and points to the critical role of the personality variable, entitlement, in this process. The results provide theoretical and practical advancement in the role of technology with people in organizations today.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Suzanne Zivnuska, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanisms underlying prevention-focus and promotion-focus, two distinct dimensions of regulatory focus undertaken to fulfill different…

1936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanisms underlying prevention-focus and promotion-focus, two distinct dimensions of regulatory focus undertaken to fulfill different goals. The authors explore distinct triggers (mindfulness and leader-member exchange (LMX)) and outcomes (role overload and burnout) of each.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is grounded in regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997), and is tested with data collected at two times from 206 full-time workers.

Findings

Findings revealed mindfulness was positively related to prevention- and promotion-focus, while LMX was positively related to only promotion-focus. Prevention-focus mediated the relationship between mindfulness and role overload and burnout, while promotion-focus mediated the relationship between both mindfulness and LMX and role overload, but not burnout.

Originality/value

This research expands the nomological network describing individual and dyadic antecedents to regulatory focus. It also explores the nature of the relationships between regulatory focus and career management consequences, and may allow us to offer useful advice for practicing managers trying to understand employee career trajectories.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2001

Suzanne Zivnuska, David J. Ketchen and Charles C. Snow

This paper analyzes the impact of the Converging Economy on the role and function of human resource management (HRM) practice and research. The forces driving convergence …

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of the Converging Economy on the role and function of human resource management (HRM) practice and research. The forces driving convergence - information technology, globalization, and the importance of human assets - are discussed and then related to both HRM practice and research. We identify and discuss nine cutting-edge practices that firms have developed to cope with the changes brought about by the Converging Economy. These practices have potential significance for managers and scholars alike: they may serve as exemplars for organizations needing to navigate the shifting terrain of the Converging Economy. After discussing these practical responses to the changing environment, we discuss several promising new ways to apply theory to this area as a guide for future HRM researchers.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-134-7

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Suzanne Zivnuska, K. Michele Kacmar, Merideth Ferguson and Dawn S. Carlson

Mindfulness is a well-studied phenomenon in many disciplines. Little is known about its impacts on employees at work. The purpose of this paper is to focus on mindfulness at work…

6236

Abstract

Purpose

Mindfulness is a well-studied phenomenon in many disciplines. Little is known about its impacts on employees at work. The purpose of this paper is to focus on mindfulness at work, defined as a psychological state in which employees intentionally pay full attention to the present moment while executing job tasks. The research model, grounded in conservation of resources theory, depicts how mindfulness at work may help employees develop resources (work-family balance and job engagement) which may be associated with greater well-being (less psychological distress and more job satisfaction) and organizational attitudes (intent to turnover and affective commitment).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 503 full time employees, the authors test the model with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results supported the full research model, suggesting that mindfulness at work is an important antecedent to resource accrual, well-being, and organizational attitudes. Mindfulness at work exerted direct and indirect effects on turnover intentions and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The inclusion of job engagement as a mediator provides an interesting counterpoint and extension of prior studies suggesting that job engagement negates the effects of mindfulness on turnover intentions (Dane, 2014).

Practical implications

The research suggests that mindfulness at work is highly trainable and may enhance a variety of career outcomes.

Originality/value

This study extends emerging literature on mindfulness at work by offering a new scale grounded in established theory and the practice of mindfulness.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Laura M. Arpan, Arthur A. Raney and Suzanne Zivnuska

This study employed a cognitive psychological approach to examining a little studied phenomenon – university image – among two groups of evaluators. The study found that different…

4692

Abstract

This study employed a cognitive psychological approach to examining a little studied phenomenon – university image – among two groups of evaluators. The study found that different groups used different criteria when rating ten major US universities. Found to significantly predict the image of the universities among a sample of current university students were three factors: academic factors, athletic factors, and the extent of news coverage of the university. Found to significantly predict the image of the same universities among an adult, non‐student sample were four factors: a combined factor including all university attributes (including academic and athletic); the extent of news coverage; the education level of respondents; and the respondents’ level of sports fanship. Recent research in attitude structure is used to explain how different image criteria are recalled and employed by the different groups.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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