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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Bin Srinidhi

Notes that to be effectively implemented, quality management has to be aligned with strategy and properly co‐ordinated. Develops a systems framework entitled congruence…

Abstract

Notes that to be effectively implemented, quality management has to be aligned with strategy and properly co‐ordinated. Develops a systems framework entitled congruence management business architecture. Notes that under this architecture an activity is the core entity for change and that every quality or related initiative will change, eliminate or create activities. Considers various quality management mechanisms under this architecture and considers various barriers. Suggests that the congruence management framework can help make quality management more effective.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Janet C. Vinzant and Douglas H. Vinzant

Many scholars have documented the importance of Deming’s legacy in the development of what is now commonly known as total quality management (TQM). Less often considered…

Abstract

Many scholars have documented the importance of Deming’s legacy in the development of what is now commonly known as total quality management (TQM). Less often considered, however, is how Deming’s teachings have influenced other approaches to management. This article examines how Deming’s work has influenced the field of strategic management. It describes the history of strategic and quality management and highlights specific areas where Deming’s contributions have influenced and strengthened strategic management. It concludes with some comments about how Deming’s approach can be used to help organizations achieve both quality and strategic advantage.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Henrik V. Andersen, Gavin Lawrie and Nenad Savič

Quality initiatives in the West have produced limited long‐term success compared with equivalent initiatives in Japan. Some claim that this is due to the absence of…

Abstract

Quality initiatives in the West have produced limited long‐term success compared with equivalent initiatives in Japan. Some claim that this is due to the absence of explicit links between strategy and operational initiatives. The paper aims to tests this claim and suggests an approach that better supports quality management initiatives. The paper is based on a combination of literature review and case studies. It supports the assumption that an explicit link between strategy and operational initiatives is a critical success factor in deriving long‐term benefits from quality initiatives. It is an equally important feature of best practice performance management system design and the paper finds that quality management initiatives can be implemented more successfully, when associated with a robust corporate performance management approach based on modern strategic control principles. The paper demonstrates how the latest evolution of balanced scorecard – third‐generation balanced scorecard – adheres to such control principles and illustrates how it supports effective application of a number of popular quality management tools. The limited success of quality initiatives, along with the continued popularity of some of these tools, suggests that any approach, which effectively helps decrease the risk of failure, would carry significant value.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Mahour Mellat‐Parast and Lester A. Digman

This paper aims to investigate the role of quality management (QM) practices in the success of strategic alliances.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of quality management (QM) practices in the success of strategic alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the literature, a conceptual model employing a relational view of inter‐organizational competitive advantage is proposed, which attempts to address the concept of quality management in strategic alliances and networks.

Findings

Trust and co‐operative learning have emerged as critical factors that affect the success of strategic alliances. The proposed model, while integrating elements of quality management and strategic alliances, determines alliance success and alliance satisfaction as the outcomes of strategic alliances. Several propositions have been developed to address the relationship between different constructs in the model. The effects of trust and co‐operative learning on alliance performance are discussed, and key areas for research are identified.

Practical implications

Companies can achieve a higher level of performance and satisfaction from alliances.

Originality/value

While previous research on quality management has been focused on the implementation of quality management within a firm, by extending the concept of quality management to strategic alliances this paper expands quality management implementation beyond the traditional view of quality.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Luís María R. Calingo

Strategic quality management represents a state wherein the organization’s total quality management (TQM) system is tightly interwoven with the strategy formulation…

Abstract

Strategic quality management represents a state wherein the organization’s total quality management (TQM) system is tightly interwoven with the strategy formulation process, thereby contributing to a sustainable competitive advantage. Numerous models have been proposed to describe how organizations can fully integrate strategy and TQM. Proposes that organizations undergo evolutionary stages on the way to full integration of strategy and TQM. The conceptual bases of the proposed model consist of organizational life cycles, stages of quality maturity and models describing the evolution of strategic management. Gives examples of corporations in the USA and the Asia‐Pacific region which provide preliminary support for the model’s validity.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Charles R. Gowen, Kathleen L. McFadden and William J. Tallon

Healthcare organizations have addressed current error issues by adopting quality programs, which usually include strategic human resource management (HRM). However, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare organizations have addressed current error issues by adopting quality programs, which usually include strategic human resource management (HRM). However, little research has focused on the determinants of successful quality programs at healthcare organizations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the centrality of strategic HRM for addressing healthcare errors, error reduction barriers, quality management processes and practices, quality program results, and competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this study involves the analysis of questionnaire data from the quality and/or risk directors of 587 US hospitals by factor analysis and regression analysis.

Findings

The findings focus on highly statistically significant relationships of strategic HRM with antecedent healthcare error sources, error reduction barriers, and quality management processes and practices, as well as the strategic HRM consequences of perceived quality program results and sustainable competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of perceptual data and common method variance are checked. Future research could investigate international effects.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that hospital errors can be successfully addressed with effective strategic HRM, quality management processes, and quality management practices.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is the centrality of strategic HRM as a determinant of successful quality programs at healthcare organizations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Juha Kettunen

This study aims to present a general conceptual framework which can be used to evaluate quality and institutional performance in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a general conceptual framework which can be used to evaluate quality and institutional performance in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The quality of higher education is at the heart of the setting up of the European Higher Education Area. Strategic management is widely used in higher education institutions and is a strong candidate for the general framework of management. The balanced scorecard approach has been designed as a mechanism to communicate and implement the strategic plan and make it more understandable to stakeholders.

Findings

The concepts of quality and strategy maps provide the tools that can be used to describe the conceptual framework to describe the quality assurance system and institutional performance.

Originality/value

The quality and performance of a higher education institution are evaluated by national quality assurance agencies and many other stakeholders having various objectives and interests. The evaluation is based on the backgrounds and subjective experiences of the evaluators. Therefore there is clearly a need for a common and rational framework for the evaluation.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Carlos A. Albacete‐Sáez, Maria Mar Fuentes‐Fuentes and Ana María Bojica

The purpose of this paper is to clarify whether there are differences in the implementation of quality management (QM) and the results achieved, based on the position of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify whether there are differences in the implementation of quality management (QM) and the results achieved, based on the position of the person responsible for QM and his/her strategic priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 256 firms that have implemented QM are collected. A multigroup analysis with LISREL is employed to contrast the hypotheses using a sample of general managers on the one hand and of quality managers on the other.

Findings

This study shows that QM is stronger implemented when it is headed by the general manager than by the quality manager. The authors also find that in both samples of general managers and quality managers, only one of the three strategic priorities analyzed, cost orientation, shows a positive effect on financial results. When the influence of QM on financial results is considered, the relationship is significant just in the case of the sample of quality directors.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the analysis performed suggest lines of research that can substantially enrich the analysis of the role of management in the implementation of QM systems. A first step would be to expand the study sample, since the subsample for general managers was not very large. Gathering more recent data could contribute to strengthening the results obtained and to identifying additional explanatory variables. For example, information on functional experience or training could clarify the strategic focus adopted by managers.

Practical implications

This study highlights that the general manager's commitment to quality confers greater credibility in the rest of the organization. Although the general managers impose greater implementation of QM, they do not perceive that this influences the financial results achieved directly. The incorporation of strategic priorities in this study also shows that the perception of differentiation in marketing in firms that have implemented QM is similar both for quality managers and for general managers. However, the former (quality managers) also show that differentiation in innovation has a positive effect on QM.

Originality/value

Literature has shown an indisputable consensus on the relevance of leadership and the commitment of top management to the success of QM, but few studies provide more in‐depth specific knowledge of the characteristics and actions developed by the person who leads the commitment to quality. This study tackles the role of the manager responsible for QM in the firm, based on his or her functional position, whether general manager or quality manager. It contributes by investigating how a manager's strategic priorities condition the level of QM implementation, as well as the financial performance achieved.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2000

Scott A. Dellana and Richard D. Hauser

The purpose of this research is to further examine the relationship between organizational culture and a strategic approach to quality, as embodied in Malcolm Baldrige…

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to further examine the relationship between organizational culture and a strategic approach to quality, as embodied in Malcolm Baldrige Quality award criteria. To accomplish this, a questionnaire was developed for a postal survey. The questionnaire was based upon the Competing Values Model of Culture and the Baldrige Award criteria to define the position of the company in their strategic quality approach. This questionnaire was then sent to 1000 members of the American Society for Quality. A total of 219 usable responses were received and analyzed. The results indicate that higher Baldrige scores tend to be significantly related to the Adhocracy and Group cultural types.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Moreno‐Luzón and F.J. Peris

The main contribution of this paper is to integrate into one model management and organizational fields that are normally analyzed separately: contingency factors…

Abstract

The main contribution of this paper is to integrate into one model management and organizational fields that are normally analyzed separately: contingency factors, organizational design variables, strategic approaches and quality management approaches. The essential core of the model is constituted by three basic variables of organizational design: level of centralization, level of formalization‐standardization, and level of shared vision and common values. Through analysis using this conceptual tool, we can: assess the position of tasks and organizational units in relation to these organizational variables; evaluate the congruence between organizational variables and contingency factors; identify relationships between strategic management approaches and quality approaches; and establish a fit between strategic management approaches, organizational variables, contingency factors and quality approaches.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

Keywords

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