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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2021

Riaz Uddin Ahmed

This study investigates the impact of social media marketing activities (SMMA) on shoppers' store love and the impact of store love on store loyalty in grocery retail…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the impact of social media marketing activities (SMMA) on shoppers' store love and the impact of store love on store loyalty in grocery retail. Moreover, it explores the mediating and moderating role of store love and social media usage intensity (SMUI).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among grocery shoppers and social media users in Norway. A total of 177 valid responses were collected and analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The study discovered that SMMA impacts store love, and store love affects store loyalty. Store love serves as a mediator between SMMA and store loyalty. SMUI positively moderates the relationship between SMMA and store love; however, the relationship between store love and store loyalty is not moderated by SMUI.

Research limitations/implications

Despite having limited generalizability from a cross-sectional study, this study provides literary additions to the body of knowledge in grocery retail and enhances the cognitive appraisal theory (CAT) and the attachment theory (AT).

Practical implications

The findings of this study will help grocery shoppers, store managers and grocery chain marketers to comprehend the role of SMMA in building emotional attachment with a grocery store and help make better decisions.

Originality/value

For the first time, this study incorporated SMUI as a moderator in the relationship between SMMA, store love and store loyalty in grocery retail. The study also proposes a new explanation for the relationship between SMMA and store loyalty by highlighting the mediating role of store love.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Isabelle Collin-Lachaud and Mbaye Fall Diallo

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to investigate how in-store mobile use affects store loyalty directly or indirectly via the mediation of store value and whether social influence moderates such relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 862 actual customers from a market research company panel, we used structural equation modelling to test a series of research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show a positive but weak effect of in-store smartphone use on loyalty. This effect is significantly mediated by the store’s hedonic and symbolic value dimensions, but not by its utilitarian value. This research also uncovers significant moderation effects of social influence on the relationships investigated. The effect of in-store smartphone use on store loyalty is stronger when social influence is lower. However, the effects of hedonic and symbolic store value are stronger when social influence is higher.

Research limitations/implications

This research is carried out in one country (France). It focuses on social influence through in-store mobile phone use; it would also be useful to consider physical social influence.

Practical implications

Retailers should position their stores on specific value dimensions and use social influence appropriately to improve loyalty. For instance, utilitarian value should be offered to customers with low social influence. To prevent negative social influence, retailers could develop “controlled” social influence through their own private mobile app to favour interaction.

Originality/value

This research underlines the critical role of store value and social influence on the relationships between smartphone use and store loyalty. It shows that the effects of value dimensions (utilitarian, hedonic and symbolic) on loyalty differ depending on social influence level.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2003

Dong‐Mo Koo

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract…

6180

Abstract

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract and global image component, influence consumers’ satisfaction and how consumers’ satisfaction, in turn, affects store loyalty. The data, collected from a sample of 517 discount retail customers in Daegu, Korea, indicate that: (1) forming the overall attitude is more closely related to in‐store services: atmosphere, employee service, after sales service and merchandising, (2) store satisfaction is formed through perceived store atmosphere and value, (3) the overall attitude has strong influence on satisfaction and loyalty and its impact is much stronger on loyalty than on satisfaction, (4) store loyalty is directly affected by most significantly location, merchandising and after sale service in order, (5) satisfaction is not related to customers’ committed store revisiting behavior. The applications in management and implications for future research are discussed.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

S. Umit Kucuk

The purpose of this paper is to provide clear insights into the influence of product availability, and thus distribution on double jeopardy (DJ) patterns, for…

2128

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide clear insights into the influence of product availability, and thus distribution on double jeopardy (DJ) patterns, for frequently‐purchased products (FPP). This paper also aims to provide important strategies in order to maximize the efficiency of retailers' stocking decisions and manufacturers' branding efforts by discussing distribution dynamics in a set of experiments developed in light of related theoretical discussions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides an in‐depth literature review of DJ, distribution, out‐of‐stock and consumer behavioural brand loyalty in many marketing and supply chain decisions. A practical simulation is developed to test the main hypotheses in the study in light of the theoretical discussion.

Findings

The study's results indicated that distribution might explain DJ patterns. In addition, distribution might create behavioural brand loyalty when FPP are widely available (excessive availability) in the market.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study provides a simulation structure and varying experiments, more field data about FPP might also enhance the study's results.

Practical implications

Small brands can break their curse as indicated by the DJ phenomenon by focusing on distribution. Also, they might create some level of behavioural brand loyalty by being available everywhere in the market.

Originality/value

The impact of distribution on DJ has seldom been discussed in general terms previously, and has never been discussed and explored theoretically with specificity using experimental analysis. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that distribution has a strong potential to explain the reasons behind DJ patterns and might create behavioural brand loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Anne‐Sophie Binninger

Retail brands (RBs) have become a strategic feature of the grocery industry. Their role in building consumer loyalty is usually taken for granted and yet has not been…

10341

Abstract

Purpose

Retail brands (RBs) have become a strategic feature of the grocery industry. Their role in building consumer loyalty is usually taken for granted and yet has not been completely identified. The purpose of this paper is to raise the question of the relationship between RBs and store loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlations, simple and multiple regressions were carried out, and the mediating and moderating nature of two variables was verified according to Baron and Kenny's recommendations.

Findings

The results show that the increase in RB satisfaction and loyalty influences store loyalty, and that attitude toward RB products has a moderating effect on the relationships between RB satisfaction and loyalty. They also show that this moderating influence is greater for an identifiable retail brand than for an unidentifiable retail brand.

Research limitations/implications

Further research would consist in probing the relationship between a customer and different types of RBs. It would be appropriate to assess this relationship by pinning down the influence of product categories and working in other psychological variables like attachment, trust or price sensitivity as well as behavioral data.

Practical implications

These findings highlight the value of consumer RB satisfaction and loyalty, and suggest that managers develop marketing insights to enhance the loyalty‐building capacity of their own brands, by specifically addressing whether or not these are clearly identified as brands of a store.

Originality/value

The idea of analyzing the influence of RBs on store loyalty using three classic dimensions of brand management (satisfaction, loyalty, and attitude) yet untapped in the specific case of RBs, and distinguishing between two specific types of RBs.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Sreejesh S., Abhigyan Sarkar and Sudeepta Pradhan

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

1425

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from selected retail stores using stratified random sampling. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that the impacts of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations are mediated both by store love and store satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study’s findings help practitioners by empirically demonstrating that the combined cognitive satisfaction of consumers with store loyalty programs and affective store love mediate the influences of loyalty programs on consumer loyalty toward the store and on the consumer–store relation. Therefore, cognitive satisfaction with loyalty programs alone cannot create strong loyalty and a customer relationship. Cognitive satisfaction with various loyalty programs must be converted into affective store love for the mediation to be significant and effective.

Originality/value

This research adds value to the domain of store loyalty research by empirically establishing the mediating role played by the cognitive satisfaction-affective love framework in shaping the influences of loyalty programs designed by store management on the final store loyalty and customer–store relationship.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Josée Bloemer and Ko de Ruyter

In this article the relationship between store image, store satisfaction and store loyalty is examined. A distinction is made between true store loyalty and spurious store

23098

Abstract

In this article the relationship between store image, store satisfaction and store loyalty is examined. A distinction is made between true store loyalty and spurious store loyalty and manifest and latent satisfaction with the store. We hypothesise that the positive relationship between manifest store satisfaction and store loyalty is stronger than the positive relationship between latent store satisfaction and store loyalty. Furthermore, we hypothesise a direct as well as an indirect effect through satisfaction of store image on store loyalty. Second, the relationship between store image and store loyalty is mediated by store satisfaction. We do not find evidence for a direct effect of store image on store loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Anne-Françoise Audrain-Pontevia and Marc Vanhuele

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in store loyalty and how those differences evolve with age.

4259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in store loyalty and how those differences evolve with age.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected in a survey of 32,054 shoppers in more than 50 grocery stores belonging to the same chain. In total, 20 satisfaction items were factor-analysed, resulting in four satisfaction factors. A logistic regression with store exclusivity as the dependent variable was then run to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

This study finds that men are more loyal than women to the store chain, while women are more loyal than men to individual stores. Women’s loyalty is more influenced by their satisfaction with interaction with store employees, while for men loyalty is more influenced by satisfaction with impersonal dimensions. Store loyalty increases with age, an effect that cannot be explained solely by declining mobility and cognitive impairment.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines declared behavioural practices rather than actual behaviour. However, in view of the high frequency of purchases in the retail category examined, and also because of the large sample of over 50 different stores, declared practices should be highly correlated with actual behaviour.

Practical implications

Results from satisfaction surveys should be interpreted differently for men and women. Loyalty programmes may want to adapt their approach, to incorporate gender differences into their loyalty reinforcing measures.

Social implications

This paper should also help to a better understanding of loyalty programs for both men and women, younger and older people.

Originality/value

This is the first demonstration from an in store customer survey that the shopping experience drives store loyalty differently for men and women.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Hong‐Youl Ha, Joby John, Swinder Janda and Siva Muthaly

This paper aims to model the effect of advertising spending on brand loyalty by examining the simultaneous effects of advertising spending, store image, perceived quality…

15831

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model the effect of advertising spending on brand loyalty by examining the simultaneous effects of advertising spending, store image, perceived quality and satisfaction on brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A proposed model is compared with three competing models of the relationships amongst, and impact of, independent variables on brand loyalty. Data from the banking and discount store services in South Korea are used to examine the indirect effects of customer perceptions of advertising spending on brand loyalty.

Findings

Results elucidate the complexity of advertising spending effects on brand loyalty, with mediating roles played by store image, perceived quality and satisfaction. Significant results obtained in both banking and retail services differing in firm‐customer relationships suggest that the findings are robust.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might test the proposed research model in other cultures and conduct cross‐cultural comparisons. Other variables such as brand associations, brand trust, advertising recall might uncover additional cognitive and attitudinal structural relationships with brand loyalty.

Originality/value

The paper compares competing models of the variables of interest, which has not been done before, and indeed seen quite infrequently in scholarly research in marketing. Unlike in previous studies, this paper examines the simultaneous relationships and the mediating roles of store image, perceived quality and satisfaction in the impact of perceptions of advertising intensity on brand loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Mario J. Miranda, László Kónya and Inka Havrila

To identify the factors that influence shoppers' satisfaction with their “primary” grocery store, and those that encourage them to continue patronising it despite being…

8872

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the factors that influence shoppers' satisfaction with their “primary” grocery store, and those that encourage them to continue patronising it despite being presented with a significant inducement to shop elsewhere.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire containing 31 variables relating to shopping behaviour and satisfaction was administered to 934 shoppers leaving a number of grocery stores in an Australian city during a two‐week period. Results were used to construct two mathematical models predicting customer satisfaction and store loyalty, from which two research hypotheses were derived.

Findings

The results of model estimation show that factors with a significant influence on store satisfaction have little in common with others that impel shoppers to remain loyal to one store. Indeed, there was no evidence in this study that shoppers' overall satisfaction was by itself a significant influence on continued patronage.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire did not ask questions, judged to be intrusive, relating to respondents' income level, education background, employment status or household size – characteristics known to have a bearing on perception of risk associated with switching to an unfamiliar store and hence potentially to inhibit action. It would be instructive in future research to assess the extent to which demographic characteristics mediate perceptions of financial, psychological and social risk, and their influence on satisfaction and loyalty.

Practical implications

Retailers often do not recognise that what influences customer satisfaction is not the same as what engenders store loyalty, and consequently do not allocate scarce resources systematically among tactics influencing one or the other. Unless they are vigilant to changing consumer behaviour patterns, they will not be able to isolate in their strategy the elements of the retail mix that could insulate their loyal customers from responding to competitors' special offers.

Originality/value

This study introduces intelligence gatherers and strategic planners in the retail context to an important distinction between general satisfaction and specific loyalty.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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