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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Sreejesh S., Abhigyan Sarkar and Sudeepta Pradhan

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from selected retail stores using stratified random sampling. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that the impacts of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations are mediated both by store love and store satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study’s findings help practitioners by empirically demonstrating that the combined cognitive satisfaction of consumers with store loyalty programs and affective store love mediate the influences of loyalty programs on consumer loyalty toward the store and on the consumer–store relation. Therefore, cognitive satisfaction with loyalty programs alone cannot create strong loyalty and a customer relationship. Cognitive satisfaction with various loyalty programs must be converted into affective store love for the mediation to be significant and effective.

Originality/value

This research adds value to the domain of store loyalty research by empirically establishing the mediating role played by the cognitive satisfaction-affective love framework in shaping the influences of loyalty programs designed by store management on the final store loyalty and customer–store relationship.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Abhigyan Sarkar, Juhi Gahlot Sarkar and Gaurav Bhatt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how various retail store atmospheric cues can impact store brand loyalty (SBL) via eliciting store brand love. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how various retail store atmospheric cues can impact store brand loyalty (SBL) via eliciting store brand love. This paper posits that different store brand experiential cues can predict brand love only when the experience is processed based on perceiving the brand as human-like entity, i.e. brand anthropomorphization. Brand love cannot be strongly elicited without the sense of brand anthropomorphization. Moreover, brand love can impact brand loyalty intention only under the moderating condition of perceived firm’s positive relationship marketing orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey was conducted among urban shopping mall consumers, and the data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings support that store brand experience elicited by store environmental cues can better predict store brand love when the store is perceived as human, and store brand love can better predict conative SBL when consumer perceives that the store is having a positive relationship orientation.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in empirically testing the psychological mechanism through which store atmospheric cues lead to SBL.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2013

Marie-Cécile Cervellon and Rachael Coudriet

This research aims to investigate the factors which contribute to the power of luxury brands in the stores and the means through which brand power meaning transfers to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the factors which contribute to the power of luxury brands in the stores and the means through which brand power meaning transfers to the clients.

Design/methodology/approach

The research protocol follows a phenomenological approach, through analyses of narratives of customers with lived shopping experiences in luxury stores. Data were collected in two phases: first, a collection of experiences from clients with different cultural backgrounds in the same store; second, a comparison of experiences for the same client in thirty-three luxury stores around the world. This cross-examination procedure enhances the trustworthiness of the findings.

Findings

Although French and Raven ' s typology of power (referent, reward, coercive, legitimate, expert) is relevant when studying the luxury brand-client relationship, it is not sufficient to explain entirely the sources of the luxury brand power. Through the brand cathedral (the flagship store), the brand ambassadors (sales representative), the brand protocol (rituals and selling ceremony) and the brand treasures (the products), the luxury brand exerts an auratic power which achieves the sacralization of the brand.

Practical implications

These marks of power are difficult to transfer virtually through internet websites. To establish this power, luxury brands need a control over their operations, at least the visual merchandising and the customer relationship. This reinforces the importance of retailing in the luxury industry and the strategic role of company-owned-stores, particularly in “new luxury markets” where the auratic power of the brand is not necessarily established. Additionally, when there is power asymmetry in a service encounter, the customer becomes “hyper-vigilant” regarding the service provided. In luxury stores, the salespersons should be trained to deliver a luxury service, personalized to the very needs of the client.

Originality/value

To the authors ' knowledge, this research is the first to investigate consumers ' perception of luxury brand power.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2020

Gaurav Bhatt, Abhigyan Sarkar and Juhi Gahlot Sarkar

The majority of past studies on the physical store environment have focused on the impacts of distinct store environmental cues like music, crowding and décor on…

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of past studies on the physical store environment have focused on the impacts of distinct store environmental cues like music, crowding and décor on consumers' responses. However, recent research posits that consumer is more likely to experience several cues in a combination, rather than in isolation, i.e. different categories of store environmental cues are likely to impact consumer psychology holistically. Hence, our study aims to identify the relevant factors of store atmospheric cues impacting consumer's attitude in physical retail store context and validate scales to measure such factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This research develops and validates psychometrically reliable scales to measure two broad store stimuli factors namely: attractive and facilitating store stimuli, following the scale development method suggested by Churchill (1979).

Findings

The study shows that attractive store stimuli predict affective and sensory store brand experiences. The facilitating store stimuli moderate the effects of attractive store stimuli on affective and sensory store brand experiences. Affective and sensory store brand experiences predict store satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing body of store ambience research by empirically understanding the psychological mechanism through which customers perceive different store cues holistically leading to the elicitation of store satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Bilge Baykal

Marketplaces are changing, and customers are demanding improved experiences where they want, how they want, and when they want. The omnichannel concept is perceived as an…

Abstract

Marketplaces are changing, and customers are demanding improved experiences where they want, how they want, and when they want. The omnichannel concept is perceived as an evolution of multichannel retailing, which implies a blurring division between the physical and online stores. In the omnichannel environment, customers move freely among physical and online stores expecting seamless shopping experiences between channels. Among different generational consumer groups, Gen Z deserves marketers’ particular attention, which is the new rising segment for omnichannel experiences. The purpose of this chapter is first to verify the essence of generational differences in consumer’s omnichannel buying behavior by giving a special focus on the Gen Z segment. Secondly, this chapter discusses how retailers should integrate their online and offline store channels to provide the best retail brand experience to these distinctive Gen Z consumers.

Details

Managing Customer Experiences in an Omnichannel World: Melody of Online and Offline Environments in the Customer Journey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-389-2

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Michela Addis, Giulia Miniero and Isabella Soscia

This paper aims to explore the role of surprise in reducing the negative impact of an undesired emotion, such as embarrassment, on the attitudes and behavioral intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the role of surprise in reducing the negative impact of an undesired emotion, such as embarrassment, on the attitudes and behavioral intentions of consumers taking part in an event.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 220 consumers took part in a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental within-subject design. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings show that an in-store social event designed to elicit young customers’ surprise and feelings of romantic love might also give rise to a relevant negative emotion such as embarrassment, and that surprise can act as a powerful managerial tool in limiting the negative effects of this negative emotion. Moreover, brand attitude and purchase intention are outcomes of positive emotions elicited by the event.

Practical implications

The study shows that event marketing is an appealing but risky strategy. Evoking surprise is an effective way to manage negative emotions such as embarrassment that can arise unintentionally during an event.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of the role of contradictory emotions in a specific social experience, namely, the event, and focuses on unplanned and undesired the affective contributions of customers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2016

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Eunjoo Cho and Ann Marie Fiore

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the holistic nature of brand image for fashion-related products and to complete the initial stage of scale development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the holistic nature of brand image for fashion-related products and to complete the initial stage of scale development, determining content validity, for a new brand image measure.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptualization of brand image was based on a review of academic and industry literature and analysis of qualitative data from 11 in-depth interviews. To help assess content validity, four trained judges assessed the face validity of the initial 140 items generated; 137 scale items were retained.

Findings

Analysis of the interview data revealed that cognitive (mystery), emotional (intimacy) and sensory (sensuality) dimensions were important for brand image of fashion-related products. The results aligned with major themes proposed in the literature, but one additional theme (self-congruity) was uncovered. These findings support content validity of the brand image scale items.

Research limitations/implications

The interviews were limited to female consumers in the Midwestern USA. The present study expands the existing brand image concept by identifying its multi-dimensional nature including sensory associations. Theoretically, an expanded brand image measure increases its explanatory power in empirical studies. In terms of practical implications, fostering cognitive, emotional and sensory dimensions is essential for creating an effective fashion-related brand image, which can enhance brand equity.

Originality/value

Past brand image scales have emphasized cognitive and emotional dimensions. The new scale items represent a more holistic measure of brand image, as they include a comprehensive sensory dimension. It will be the first brand image scale geared toward fashion-related brands.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Ishita Sachdeva and Suhsma Goel

The current context of retail is extremely challenging. Retail environments are pushing consumers to appreciate hedonic aspects of consumption. Retailers are finding new…

Abstract

Purpose

The current context of retail is extremely challenging. Retail environments are pushing consumers to appreciate hedonic aspects of consumption. Retailers are finding new ways to offer customers something unique or special in order to encourage traffic to physical stores. People like to touch, feel, smell, taste, inspect, test and try on. It is a holistic approach that involves both emotional and rational triggers (Meyer, 2006, p. 1). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The basic proposition is that a shopper’s behavior is influenced by the environment. The environment (store) influences a shopper’s emotions and mood, which in turn influence the shopper’s behavior (Ebster and Garaus, 2011, p. 108). Mehrabian found a significant amount of research to back Holbrook’s findings that “emotion is a key link in the shopping experience” determining that consumers’ reactions within stores are based on their emotional states, which are stimulated by store designs (Mehrabian, 1977).

Findings

It is important to focus on engaging the customer both emotionally and behaviorally, which means that the communication on social media and physical retail stores should both excel in emotional appeal, and encourage various forms of interaction with the brand. Increasingly, success at retail is less about what the retailer has to sell and more about how they sell it. This is the new experiential paradigm shift in shopping. This will become even more critical in the future as success at retail will continue to shift toward how well retailers play to the emotions, psychology and feelings of the shopper (Danziger, 2006, p. 17). The need whether utilitarian or hedonic carries them to the store but emotions make them stay and shop.

Originality/value

Both utilitarian and hedonic experiences – whether they are derived from consuming products or total experience, including products, people, places and the environment – contribute in differing degrees, to the overall experience of consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2019

Johanna L. H. Birkland

Abstract

Details

Gerontechnology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-292-5

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