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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Chiu‐Han Wang and Sejin Ha

Built on De Wulf et al.'s relationship exchange model, the present study aims to examine store attributes as a signal for the process of customer‐retailer relationship

Abstract

Purpose

Built on De Wulf et al.'s relationship exchange model, the present study aims to examine store attributes as a signal for the process of customer‐retailer relationship building in the context of department store operation in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of college students at a US university participated in an online self‐administered survey. Exploratory factor analysis identified store attribute factors pertaining to department stores and structural equation modeling tested hypotheses.

Findings

Six store attributes relevant to department store environments were found: post‐transaction service, direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, preferential treatment, and store atmosphere. Four store attributes (direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, and preferential treatment) involve perceived relationship investment, while one store attribute dimension (store atmosphere) directly contributes to perceived relationship quality. Perceived relationship investment positively influences perceived relationship quality, which in turn influences behavioural and attitudinal loyalty intentions. The mediating effects of perceived relationship quality on the perceived relationship investment‐loyalty intention links were confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The single retail setting and student sample are limitations. Future research should examine store attribute dimensions in different retail and/or service operation settings with more diverse populations.

Originality/value

The current study demonstrated that store attributes (direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, and preferential treatment) promote customer‐retailer relationship building as relationship‐inducing factors in the department store context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Arpita Khare

The purpose of the study was to understand influence of assortment, store facility, service and relationship on Indian consumers’ small retailer patronage behaviour. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to understand influence of assortment, store facility, service and relationship on Indian consumers’ small retailer patronage behaviour. The determinant of small retailer–consumer relationships was studied.

Design/methodology/approach

Indian consumers were contacted through retail stores intercept method and requested to participate in the survey (n = 321). The questionnaire was adapted from the research conducted by Lee et al. (2008) and modified (some items on relationship were added). ANOVA and multiple regression tests were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The Indian consumers’ prefer small retailers due to assortment, service, store facility and relationship. The older and younger populations differ in their reasons for preferring small retail stores. The results show that service and assortment influence consumer-small retailer relationships.

Practical implications

The small retailers’ can harness the relationship and social interaction attribute of their service package for defending their turf against organized retail. The fast-moving consumer goods companies can use the competitive strength of small retailers for increasing their distribution in the interiors of the country and understanding market demand.

Originality/value

There is limited research in India to understand competitive advantage of small retailers over organized retailing.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Amy Wong and Amrik Sohal

Attempts to examine the concepts of trust and commitment, on two levels of retail relationships: the salesperson level as well as the store level, and test their impact on…

Abstract

Attempts to examine the concepts of trust and commitment, on two levels of retail relationships: the salesperson level as well as the store level, and test their impact on relationship quality. Based on a review of the literature, a conceptual model has been developed that links trust and commitment to relationship quality. A number of research hypotheses have been formulated to examine the relationships proposed. The paper presents the model developed and discusses some empirical findings from a survey of 1,261 shoppers in a departmental store setting in Victoria, Australia. In particular, the two levels of relationships (salesperson and store level) are examined from the customer’s perspective, using structural equation modelling (LISREL VIII). Concludes with a discussion of the implications of the study and provides directions for future research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Sreejesh S., Abhigyan Sarkar and Sudeepta Pradhan

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the influences of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations can be mediated by the store satisfaction-love framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from selected retail stores using stratified random sampling. The hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that the impacts of store loyalty programs on store loyalty and store relations are mediated both by store love and store satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study’s findings help practitioners by empirically demonstrating that the combined cognitive satisfaction of consumers with store loyalty programs and affective store love mediate the influences of loyalty programs on consumer loyalty toward the store and on the consumer–store relation. Therefore, cognitive satisfaction with loyalty programs alone cannot create strong loyalty and a customer relationship. Cognitive satisfaction with various loyalty programs must be converted into affective store love for the mediation to be significant and effective.

Originality/value

This research adds value to the domain of store loyalty research by empirically establishing the mediating role played by the cognitive satisfaction-affective love framework in shaping the influences of loyalty programs designed by store management on the final store loyalty and customer–store relationship.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Hari Govind Mishra, Piyush Kumar Sinha and Surabhi Koul

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer loyalty and customer dependence in the context of modern format and traditional format stores. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer loyalty and customer dependence in the context of modern format and traditional format stores. In the process, the role of switching cost and trust in this relationship has been explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on the literature, the authors have postulated a conceptual model and formulated relevant hypotheses. Quantitative methodology is applied with previously established. The data were collected through convenient sampling. Methods like Factor analysis, cross-tab and regression analysis have been used.

Findings

The findings indicate a significant relationship between customer loyalty and customer dependence. Switching cost and trust have been found to have a moderating effect over the relationship in both modern and traditional environments.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is the restriction to the Jammu context. The studies have brought about the difference in attitudinal and behavioural loyalty. Future research can be carried out on the role of dependence in explaining and strengthening this relationship.

Originality/value

The present study provides an insight into for the customer loyalty and customer dependence in the context of modern and traditional retail formats.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Molka Abbes and Alain Goudey

Although there is existing research investigating trust itself, there is a need for research on the concept of trust, specifically in retail environments. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is existing research investigating trust itself, there is a need for research on the concept of trust, specifically in retail environments. The purpose of this paper is to identify specific the dimensions of the concept of trust with retailing and to note impactful antecedents as activators for managers to secure long-term business.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a multi-dimensional measurement scale of trust that is examined through a structural equation modeling the connections between the determinants of the concept and its various features.

Findings

This research has identified two new key dimensions for trust, specific to the well-being retailing context: customer/salesperson relationship and customer/sales environment relationship. Hence, this research primarily highlights the role of the salesperson and advice in establishing and sustaining the customer-retailer trust relationship.

Practical implications

On the managerial level, this research helps further an advanced relational approach in the area of consumer product distribution by paying particular attention to building and developing a trust-based relationship. This research may serve as a “handbook” for any retailer looking to establish and sustain a durable relationship with their customers.

Originality/value

The paper adapts the concept of trust in the specific context of brick-and-mortar retailing and tests it thanks to a quantitative study in the field of well-being retailing. The paper uses empirical data to establish original indications regarding: new relevant dimensions for trust in a retailing context that could be used by shop managers to develop a better comprehension of trust and impactful antecedents of trust in a retailing context that could be activated by shop managers to enhance trust regarding their shops.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Eunji Seo and Katsuyoshi Takashima

The purpose of this study is to investigate the negative impact of horizontal conflict on vertical conflict in a triadic configuration, which is based on the supposition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the negative impact of horizontal conflict on vertical conflict in a triadic configuration, which is based on the supposition that buyers who experience horizontal conflict due to competition with other buyers are motivated to limit vertical conflict to better cooperate with store staff.

Design/methodology/approach

This study tests the hypotheses with an AMOS-based structure equation model based on survey data of 236 merchandise managers at Japanese retailers.

Findings

The study’s findings demonstrate that process conflict concerning resource and role allocation, negatively affects the task conflict and relationship conflict involved in vertical interactions. The results suggest that conflict between buyers is an accelerative mechanism affecting the construction of cooperative relationships between buyers and store staff.

Originality/value

Previous studies have discussed the possibility of positive effects arising from process conflict. In this study, the authors found that horizontal process conflict tolerates vertical conflict statistically and identified a new positive effect of process conflict.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Paolo Guenzi, Michael D. Johnson and Sandro Castaldo

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive model of customer trust in a retail service setting. Three levels of the customer‐to‐store relationship

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive model of customer trust in a retail service setting. Three levels of the customer‐to‐store relationship are simultaneously taken into account: customer to sales associates, customer to store branded products, and customer to the store itself.

Design/methodology/approach

Using partial least square (PLS) on a sample of 393 customers of an Italian supermarket retailer, a model linking customer trust (in the store, in store branded products and in sales associates) to overall perceived value and store loyalty intentions and behaviors is tested. Subsequently an expanded model to determine the influence of managerially controlled antecedent variables (salespeople's trustworthiness, store environment, store assortment, and communications) is estimated on the various trust levels.

Findings

Trust in the salesperson and trust in store branded products have positive effects on overall store trust. Store trust, in turn, increases perceived value and loyalty intentions. Looking at the drivers of the three levels of customer trust, salesperson trustworthiness positively affects only trust in the salesperson. Store environment has a positive impact only on overall trust in the store. Store communication fosters all three levels of customer trust, while store assortment increases both overall trust and trust in store branded products.

Practical implications

Findings of the study suggest an alternative perspective to the dominant strategies in grocery retailing services. To foster store patronage, retailers have typically invested in price cuts, promotions and loyalty schemes. Store managers may rather use sales associates, the store environment, store assortment, store branded products, and communication to foster customer trust and increase customer loyalty. Managing store brands with the goal to build trust, as opposed to increase immediate profit margins, may call for a completely different approach to private labels. Similarly, the potential relevance of interpersonal trust may suggest retailers to devote more resources to selection, recruitment and training of sales associates, and may stimulate changes in evaluation criteria, incentive schemes and reward systems.

Originality/value

The study aims at filling two important gaps in the literature: the scarcity of comprehensive store patronage models and the lack of exploration of the operational means of improving customer trust in retail services.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Josée Bloemer and Ko de Ruyter

In this article the relationship between store image, store satisfaction and store loyalty is examined. A distinction is made between true store loyalty and spurious store

Abstract

In this article the relationship between store image, store satisfaction and store loyalty is examined. A distinction is made between true store loyalty and spurious store loyalty and manifest and latent satisfaction with the store. We hypothesise that the positive relationship between manifest store satisfaction and store loyalty is stronger than the positive relationship between latent store satisfaction and store loyalty. Furthermore, we hypothesise a direct as well as an indirect effect through satisfaction of store image on store loyalty. Second, the relationship between store image and store loyalty is mediated by store satisfaction. We do not find evidence for a direct effect of store image on store loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Philippe Aurier and Gilles Séré de Lanauze

For most frequently purchased packaged goods distributed in the super‐hypermarket channel, the store is where a manufacturer's brand can develop its image and its…

Abstract

Purpose

For most frequently purchased packaged goods distributed in the super‐hypermarket channel, the store is where a manufacturer's brand can develop its image and its evaluation through an informal control on the purchase experience. Yet, for brands in this sector, better controlled in‐store purchase experiences can lead to enhance brand perceived value, relationship quality, and loyalty. To capture how these contacts take place, the authors develop the concept of in‐store manufacturer brand expression. This concept encompasses three dimensions, namely perceived quality of in‐store manufacturer brand presentation, in‐store manufacturer brand image expression, and perceived closeness of brand image with store image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of these components on brand evaluations. An empirical application on brands of the food and intimate apparel categories shows the differential impacts of these components on perceived value, relationship quality (trust‐credibility, trust‐benevolence, affective commitment), and attitudinal loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical application involves major brands positioned in frequently purchased packaged goods categories (ice cream, frozen meals and intimate apparel) and distributed in the super‐hypermarket channel over which they have no formal control. The conceptualization and measurement of perceived brand relationship orientation bears on a qualitative analysis of marketing experts and consumers. Refinement and validation of measures are applied to a convenience sample of 153 students and finally on a sample of 304 actual consumers. Structural equation modeling was used to test the model and hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived quality of in‐store brand presentation has a direct positive effect on brand value and trust‐credibility whereas in‐store brand image expression has direct positive impact on trust‐benevolence and affective commitment. At the same time, perceived closeness of brand manufacturer image with store image has a direct negative impact on trust‐credibility. In addition, the authors observed that these effects have significant indirect positive and negative consequences on attitudinal loyalty, throughout the causal links which exist between value, trust and affective commitment. Also, the authors' results support the relationship marketing model in the case of strong national brands positioned in the frequently purchased packaged goods sector.

Research limitations/implications

The application is limited to only three product categories and to strong national brands which enjoy high levels of awareness and market share. Also, the model could be connected to behavioural loyalty metrics, in addition to attitudinal loyalty.

Originality/value

Conceptualization of perceived brand relationship orientation in the case of frequently purchased packaged goods categories is a new step in the understanding and management of consumer‐brand relationship and mass market channel policies.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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