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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

V. Ann Paulins and Loren V. Geistfeld

Consumer perceptions of retail store attributes for a set of particular stores were examined to determine their effect on store preference. Respondents rated 13 stores

Abstract

Consumer perceptions of retail store attributes for a set of particular stores were examined to determine their effect on store preference. Respondents rated 13 stores. Four variables were found to affect store preference using forward stepwise logistic regression: type of clothing desired in stock, outside store appearance, shopping hours, and advertising. Significance of the effect of store attributes on store preference varied by store type. In addition, associations between customer perception of store attributes, education and age were observed. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

V.‐W. Mitchell and R.H. Kiral

Gaining competitive advantage in retailing requires knowledge of the attributes consumers use to evaluate stores and an understanding of why these attributes are…

Abstract

Gaining competitive advantage in retailing requires knowledge of the attributes consumers use to evaluate stores and an understanding of why these attributes are important. Although a number of store‐image studies have identified store attributes, evidence suggests that these attributes vary by store type and over time, but no work has considered the most crucial aspects to retailers, namely store loyalty. As no study has examined the links between store attributes and store loyalty, our knowledge remains largely speculative. This article explores this link using Kelly′s repertory grid methodology to assess the store images of three UK grocery retailers. Important differences were seen between primary store‐loyal customers’ perception of their store and secondary store‐loyal customers’ perception of that store. For example, primary‐loyal Tesco customers perceived quality, convenience and value factors in that order of importance, whilst primary‐loyal Kwik‐Save customers perceived quality, value and convenience factors when considering Tesco. Implications for retail positioning strategies and the development of store loyalty are discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Mbaye Fall Diallo and Gérard Cliquet

International retailers operating in different emerging countries should figure out how their store image is perceived across these countries and whether they should adapt…

Abstract

Purpose

International retailers operating in different emerging countries should figure out how their store image is perceived across these countries and whether they should adapt or standardise the retail offer. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how store image is perceived across different emerging markets and how it relates to customer knowledge cues and personal characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A store-intercept survey undertaken in Brazil and Vietnam generated 505 usable responses from customers of two metropolitan cities (Brasilia and Hanoi), respectively, in Brazil and Vietnam. The questionnaires were collected in Extra (Brazil) and Big C (Vietnam) retail chains belonging both to the same group (Casino, France).

Findings

Overall, this paper reveals that emerging market customers assess positively modern retail stores and are concerned about services, merchandise, and store layout when shopping. More specifically, the results indicate differences and similarities between Brazilian and Vietnamese customers in terms of store image attributes, store image dimensions, and overall store image. Moreover, customer knowledge of retailers affects store image perceptions at different levels in both countries. Also, significant differences arise across age, gender, and education in both countries, but not across household income categories.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents were customers of only two emerging markets (Brazil and Vietnam) and shoppers of two retail chains (Extra and Big C). Caution should therefore be exercised when generalising the results to other emerging markets.

Practical implications

The paper shows both differences and similarities in store image perceptions in different emerging countries. Because store layout is more positively rated in Brazil than in Vietnam, retailers should be careful to that attribute. In both countries, to improve assortment perceptions, managers might focus on first price (budget) store brands, which can help diversify the assortment and attract less wealthy customers. The service dimension also demands careful management, but personnel training should mirror the local culture.

Originality/value

This research highlights differences and similarities between Brazilian and Vietnamese customers in terms of store image perceptions. It shows that store image mechanisms are similar in emerging countries as in developed countries. Furthermore, the paper is the first to relate store image perceptions to customer knowledge cues in emerging countries.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Gopal Das

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influences of store attributes on store personality dimensions across different consumer segments. Subsequently, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influences of store attributes on store personality dimensions across different consumer segments. Subsequently, the study examines impact of store personality dimensions on consumer store choice behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall-intercept survey was undertaken using a systematic sampling of department store shoppers of age 18 years and above in Kolkata, a metropolitan city of India. Questionnaire was used to collect data from busy shopping malls or centres located in different places of Kolkata. Multiple regression analysis is used to examine the objectives of this study.

Findings

Results revealed that different sets of store attributes positively affect the various store personality dimensions differently across the segments. The study also found the positive impacts of store personality dimensions on consumer store choice behaviour.

Originality/value

Arguably, this study is the first to explore the link between store attributes and store personality across the consumer segments, and the impacts of store personality dimensions on consumer store choice behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Chiu‐Han Wang and Sejin Ha

Built on De Wulf et al.'s relationship exchange model, the present study aims to examine store attributes as a signal for the process of customer‐retailer relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Built on De Wulf et al.'s relationship exchange model, the present study aims to examine store attributes as a signal for the process of customer‐retailer relationship building in the context of department store operation in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of college students at a US university participated in an online self‐administered survey. Exploratory factor analysis identified store attribute factors pertaining to department stores and structural equation modeling tested hypotheses.

Findings

Six store attributes relevant to department store environments were found: post‐transaction service, direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, preferential treatment, and store atmosphere. Four store attributes (direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, and preferential treatment) involve perceived relationship investment, while one store attribute dimension (store atmosphere) directly contributes to perceived relationship quality. Perceived relationship investment positively influences perceived relationship quality, which in turn influences behavioural and attitudinal loyalty intentions. The mediating effects of perceived relationship quality on the perceived relationship investment‐loyalty intention links were confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The single retail setting and student sample are limitations. Future research should examine store attribute dimensions in different retail and/or service operation settings with more diverse populations.

Originality/value

The current study demonstrated that store attributes (direct mail, interpersonal communication, merchandise, and preferential treatment) promote customer‐retailer relationship building as relationship‐inducing factors in the department store context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

Ruoh‐Nan Yan and Molly Eckman

Lifestyle centres are emerging retail locations and yet have not been included in past studies of shopping centres. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Lifestyle centres are emerging retail locations and yet have not been included in past studies of shopping centres. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether and how individual and retail characteristics impact consumers' patronage behaviours at three popular retail locations (i.e. central business districts, lifestyle centres, and traditional enclosed shopping malls) in the USA and understand consumers' perceptions of the three different retail locations.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey was conducted and 410 surveys were returned. Multiple regression analyses and t‐test were conducted to test proposed hypotheses.

Findings

This study revealed that shopping orientation, importance of retail attributes, and beliefs about retail attributes influence patronage behaviour (i.e. shopping frequency) at the three retail locations. Additionally, consumers' responses suggest that they did regard lifestyle centres differently from the central business district and the traditional enclosed shopping mall on many aspects of the retail attributes examined in this research.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that respondents were consumers of a specific geographic area with certain retail locations. Findings may not be generalizeable.

Practical implications

Understanding how consumers evaluate the three retail locations enables practitioners to develop and/or revise their retail strategies in order to be competitive in the current market.

Originality/value

This is the first study investigating consumers' perceptions of three major retail locations by including the newly emerging lifestyle centres in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Jai Ok Kim and Byoungho Jin

As the competition in domestic markets increases, multinational retailers are expanding globally. Multinational discounters such as Wal‐Mart and Carrefour have been vying…

Abstract

As the competition in domestic markets increases, multinational retailers are expanding globally. Multinational discounters such as Wal‐Mart and Carrefour have been vying against Korean discounters for market share with the full liberalization of the distribution sector in 1997. This study examined various aspects of discount store retailing (store attributes, shopping costs) and consumers’ shopping motives, values, and retail outcomes (e.g. shopping excitement, satisfaction and repatronage intention), to understand Korean consumers’ discount store patronage. Significant differences were found in store image perceptions and shoppers’ internal orientations between multinational discount store patrons vs Korean discount store patrons. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Bernhard Swoboda, Frank Haelsig, Hanna Schramm‐Klein and Dirk Morschett

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one of the main antecedents of consumer behaviour concerning its role in building a retail brand. It addresses how consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on one of the main antecedents of consumer behaviour concerning its role in building a retail brand. It addresses how consumer involvement influences perception of retailer attributes, which affects customer‐based retail brand equity when considering retailers as brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed that includes the impact of central dimensions of the perception of retailer attributes, their effects on customer‐based retail brand equity and the moderating role of consumer involvement. The empirical study is based on a sample of 3,000 consumers spread over five retail sectors (grocery, clothing, DIY, electronics and furniture).

Findings

Using multiple‐group structural equation modelling, the intersectoral relevance of involvement as a moderator in building a strong retail brand is demonstrated. In retailing, consumer involvement has a moderating effect on the influence of retailer attributes on retail brand equity. The direction of this influence differs, however, from one perceived retailer attribute to the next. Whereas the influence of price, communication and store design is greater on highly involved consumers than on those with low involvement, the influence of service and assortment is greater in consumers with low involvement. Since consumers with a different level of involvement have a different perception of retailer attributes, this factor is relevant to retail branding.

Originality/value

Understanding retailers as brands – conceptually – a basic model shows how to build retail brand equity using the dimensions of retailer marketing instruments, and this model is stable enough to test different antecedents, including involvement for the first time in this context. The five sectors surveyed distinguish the study methodologically from those that focus only on one sector. Finally, the results show that the retailer attributes relevant to retail brand equity differ between customers with high involvement and those with low involvement. This aspect must be considered in the preliminary stages of retail brand building.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

María Pilar Martínez‐Ruiz, Ana Isabel Jiménez‐Zarco and Robert Cascio

This paper aims to establish the main factors that underlie store attributes, to examine which exert the greatest influences on the achievement of a maximum level of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish the main factors that underlie store attributes, to examine which exert the greatest influences on the achievement of a maximum level of customer satisfaction. This study seeks to determine if there are significant differences not only in the factor compositions but also in their influence on customer satisfaction, depending on the country of residence of focal customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The test of the proposed framework consists of analyses of two samples of customers that purchased in grocery stores in Spain and the USA. Following a factor analysis of the principal components, a binary logistic regression analysis tests the influence of the identified factors on customer satisfaction.

Findings

This work contributes to extant literature by assessing differences in the main factors that contribute to satisfaction with food stores, depending on the location of the customer.

Practical implications

This work is especially useful to grocery retailers that operate, or plan to operate, in different countries; it outlines key factors to consider to achieve upper‐bounded customer satisfaction scores.

Originality/value

The proposed classification of attributes and factors, according to their importance for customers' evaluations in different countries, includes three main factors. The first‐order factor includes the most valued attributes by all customers, independent of the country of residence. The second‐order factors include attributes with lesser importance though still valued by customers; the importance depends on the country of residence. Finally, the third‐order factor attributes are valued relatively less.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Noel Mark Noël

The purpose of this paper is to establish a measurement process for consumer perceptions and judgments of strategic importance to apparel retailers like hedonic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a measurement process for consumer perceptions and judgments of strategic importance to apparel retailers like hedonic and utilitarian shopping behavior, as well as internal process benchmarks such as apparel brands' names, store signage, and textile preferences. The paper aims to provide a simple, flexible and easy to use measurement technique that can be applied to small samples of respondents in order to capture their overall perceptions and judgments of key interest to management.

Design/methodology/approach

Magnitude estimation, along with a repeated measures design, was tested and evaluated based on the validation process put forth by Steven's power law. Data were collected from three focus groups whose respondents were selected based on their store loyalty and prior purchase of women's petit apparel in a discount outlet store. Their responses were benchmarked with those of other competitive discount retailers and with selected internal process measures.

Findings

All applications of the measurement technique were validated. Loyal shoppers for apparel purchased in a value store were found to have a preference to a competitive set of value stores but perceived all other discount stores as higher in store shopping experience. Findings were presented to articulate the resolution and clarity of the magnitude‐determined ratio scales versus those of typical interval scales and multi‐attribute measures.

Research limitations/implications

The comparisons provided here are for illustrative purposes only and are based on a selected group of one company's loyal customers during a defined shopping season.

Originality/value

Consumer perceptions of key interest to retail management are shown to be measured and benchmarked in a practical setting using this technique.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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