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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Khalid Jamil, Zahid Hussain, Rana Faizan Gul, Muhammad Asim Shahzad and Ahsan Zubair

The knowledge about a specific product develops self-confidence among consumers and facilitates them to share and search for information. This study aims to highlight the…

Abstract

Purpose

The knowledge about a specific product develops self-confidence among consumers and facilitates them to share and search for information. This study aims to highlight the effects of consumer’s self-esteem on search and share intentions of information. Furthermore, this relationship was analyzed through the mediation of subjective knowledge (SK).

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 1,136 Chinese respondents having a perception of purchasing cellphones. To analyze the data, check its normality and validity, analysis of moment structures (AMOS) was used. However, to inspect the relationship of study variables, “structural equation modeling” and Hayes and Preacher’s (2014) model were used to mediate the analysis.

Findings

The study results revealed that consumer’s self-confidence (information acquisition confidence, persuasive knowledge confidence, personal outcome decision-making and market interface confidence) affect the information search and share the intention of consumers. Additionally, the presence of SK significantly and positively mediates this relationship.

Originality/value

This study intends to investigate the role of all practical aspects of consumer’s self-confidence in searching and sharing information by mediating the role of SK. Moreover, it used all the possible and useful dimensions, which were ignored by previous studies.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Jitong Li and Karen K. Leonas

This study aims to investigate consumer knowledge of environmentally sustainable apparel (ESA) and examine the impact of communication on consumer knowledge of ESA.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumer knowledge of environmentally sustainable apparel (ESA) and examine the impact of communication on consumer knowledge of ESA.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a quantitative survey focused on Millennial and Generation Z consumers. Two communication methods, hangtags and product webpages, were involved. First, two instruments were established to measure consumers’ objective and subjective knowledge of ESA. Second, two questionnaires were developed to collect participants’ knowledge before and after reading hangtags or product webpages.

Findings

There were 385 useable responses. It was found that participants’ knowledge about waste and cotton production’s water issues was less than their knowledge of other subjects and did not increase after reading the related information on hangtags or webpages. Participants’ subjective knowledge was significantly higher than their objective knowledge after communication. The positive effects of communicating with consumers via hangtags and webpages on consumers’ subjective knowledge were confirmed. Additionally, the ESA information provided via hangtags was more effective than webpages in improving consumers’ objective knowledge.

Originality/value

This study makes up for the deficiency in the literature. It provides in-depth insights on consumersknowledge of ESA by investigating consumer knowledge before and after communication based on consumer knowledge structure. The textile and apparel industry can use this study’s findings to improve communication with consumers and aid in sustainable product distribution.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Pingjun Jiang and Bert Rosenbloom

This research reviews numerous studies of the relationship between consumer knowledge and external search in conventional marketing channels to investigate differences…

Abstract

Purpose

This research reviews numerous studies of the relationship between consumer knowledge and external search in conventional marketing channels to investigate differences among these studies that have produced conflicting results. The findings provide a benchmark for future researchers and practitioners seeking to gain insight into consumer information search processes unfolding in the new environment of online, mobile, and social networking channels.

Methodology

A meta-analysis of an extensive array of empirical studies of the relationship between consumer knowledge and external information search was conducted. Regression analysis was used to test whether certain characteristics in the studies can explain variability in the effect sizes in which effect sizes are entered as dependent variables and moderators as independent variables.

Findings

Objective and subjective knowledge tend to increase search, while direct experience tends to reduce search. Consumers with higher objective knowledge search more when pursuing credence products. However, they search relatively less when pursuing search products. Consumers with higher subjective knowledge are much more likely to search in the context of experience products, but as is the case for objective knowledge having little effect on search for experience products, subjective knowledge has no significant effect on information seeking for search products. In addition, objective knowledge facilitates more information search in a complex decision-making context while higher subjective knowledge fosters more external information search in a simple decision-marketing context. Finally, the findings indicate that the knowledge search relationship reflects strong linkage in the pre-Internet era.

Originality

Relatively little is known about how the relationship between knowledge and information search varies across different types of products in simple or complex decision-making contexts. This study begins to fill this gap by providing insight into the relative importance of objective knowledge, subjective knowledge, and direct experience in influencing consumer information search activities for search, experience, and credence products in simple or complex decision-making contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Xingjun Huang, Yun Lin, Ming K. Lim, Ming-Lang Tseng and Fuli Zhou

Technological innovation is one of the remarkable characteristics of electric vehicles (EVs). This study aims to analyze how consumers' technological knowledge affects…

Abstract

Purpose

Technological innovation is one of the remarkable characteristics of electric vehicles (EVs). This study aims to analyze how consumers' technological knowledge affects their intention to adopt EVs.

Design/methodology/approach

Original data were collected via a survey of 443 participants in China. An extended technology acceptance model was constructed to identify the factors influencing consumers' intention to adopt EVs and related technological knowledge pathways.

Findings

The results show that consumer technological knowledge is positively and significantly related to EVs' perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived fun to use and consumers' intention to adopt EVs. In addition, no direct and significant relationship is found between perceived fun to use and willingness to adopt EVs, from the technical knowledge dimension.

Practical implications

Imparting consumers with EV technological knowledge and usefulness may be an effective way to enhance their awareness and willingness to use EVs. Moreover, the role of females in the decision to adopt EVs should not be ignored, especially in decisions to purchase a family car.

Originality/value

Prior studies lack a technological knowledge-based view, and few studies have discussed how to explore the effects of consumer technological knowledge about EVs on their adoption intention. This study fills the research gap.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Mohamed H. Elsharnouby, Jasmine Mohsen, Omnia T. Saeed and Abeer A. Mahrous

This study aims to examine the relationships between the online communities’ characteristics and resilience to negative information (RNI) mediated by both brand knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships between the online communities’ characteristics and resilience to negative information (RNI) mediated by both brand knowledge and brand involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

According to stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R) framework, this research postulates that information quality, rewards and virtual interactivity drive RNI directly and indirectly through brand knowledge and/ or brand involvement. A survey of 326 Facebook pages followers was conducted, representing followers of fashion clothing brands in social media platforms in Egypt. We have used AMOS to check the constructs’ validity and reliability, as well as the Hayes’s PROCESS macro to test the mediation.

Findings

The findings show that information quality, rewards and virtual interactivity are the respective drivers of brand knowledge and brand involvement; the brand knowledge and brand involvement help explain why consumers are resilient to negative information of specific brands; and the drivers of brand knowledge and/ or brand involvement differ in consumers who tend to ignore negative information they receive about the brand.

Practical implications

Outcomes of the research recommend that executives should identify the outstanding determinants for improving resilient consumers to negative information through creating the highest possible brand knowledge and involvement between the consumers and brands.

Originality/value

Little attention has been paid to examine the RNI and linking it with brand knowledge and brand involvement in online communities’ context, thus, the current research is conducted.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Erny Rachmawati, Suliyanto and Agus Suroso

The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between product knowledge and product involvement with purchase decision-making. In addition, this study also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between product knowledge and product involvement with purchase decision-making. In addition, this study also determines the role of halal brand awareness as a moderating variable in influencing the relationship between product knowledge and product involvement with purchase decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

Five major cities in Indonesia were chosen as study locations because they are student cities, and also cities with more population and more famous in Indonesia, so the sample is more heterogeneous. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed using a convenience sampling method with an effective rate of 93%. Hypotheses are tested by structural equation modeling procedures using analysis of moment structure 22.0.

Findings

The empirical results suggest that product knowledge and product involvement have a positive and significant effect on consumer purchase decision-making; halal brand awareness is a moderating variable in the relationship between product knowledge and product involvement with purchase decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopts convenience sampling with the sampling area restricted in five cities, so it may not be suitable to be concluded as a consumer in general. This study only conducts research on halal food products in general. Future research may choose to use one brand of halal food product or compare several other halal food product brands. The results of the study support that the heterogeneity of respondents (age, education, gender and religion) has always been an important component in the study of consumption behavior. So that future research can examine the effect of different characteristics of respondents on the relationship between product knowledge, product involvement, halal brand awareness and purchase decisions.

Practical implications

The findings have significant implications that can help producers to develop strategies suitable for halal brand awareness and heighten the decision to purchase halal products by consumers in both Muslim and non-Muslim countries. So that the branding of halal products can enable businesses to access new markets for non-Muslim consumers in both Muslim and non-Muslim countries, so as to increase producer profitability by selling products at higher prices thereby providing higher profit margins.

Originality/value

In accordance with the author’s knowledge, this study is the first study to examine the moderator role of halal brand awareness variables in the relationship of product knowledge and product involvement with purchase decision-making.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Mohammed Ziaul Hoque and Md. Nurul Alam

The purpose of the paper is to examine the influence of consumers' perceived knowledge, knowledge discrepancy and confusion on the intention to purchase farmed fish (FF…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the influence of consumers' perceived knowledge, knowledge discrepancy and confusion on the intention to purchase farmed fish (FF) via a survey design regarding perceptions, buying and consumption practices of urban households in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples of 498 households were selected from a stratified cluster from the Chittagong city and were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The data have been analysed using exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results show that consumers' subjective knowledge (SK) is significant for purchase intention whereas objective knowledge (OK) is not. Again, consumers' SK, OK, knowledge discrepancy and confusion have no influence in forming consumers' attitude towards FF. However, consumers who overestimate their actual level of knowledge hold negative attitude towards FF and vice versa. Furthermore, consumers' OK affects their confusion inversely although it does not influence the purchase intention significantly.

Practical implications

If the marketers can frame a more engaging means of communication and knowledge enhancement plan, consumers' attitude and purchase intention regarding FF will be signified.

Originality/value

This is the first study that fundamentally contributes to the scientific research in that it measures the knowledge discrepancy of consumers regarding FF. In addition, this study substantiates that low objective knowledge leads to confusing consumers at the time of purchasing. The effect of overestimating the level of knowledge as well as underestimating the level of knowledge in explaining the purchase intention of FF would be a supplementary addition.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Julie V. Stanton and Laurel Aynne Cook

This paper aims to examine how product knowledge influences consumers to consider available information before choosing between organic and non-organic options. As…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how product knowledge influences consumers to consider available information before choosing between organic and non-organic options. As “certified organic” is based on a complex standard in the USA, many consumers have only partial understanding of the term. This research shows how that knowledge influences consumer evaluation of the options presented in the market.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-study experimental survey that offers respondents a choice between two canned soups, one organic and one not, along with front- and back-of-label information which they can decide to use is utilized. The two studies differ in inclusion of national brand.

Findings

Consumer behavior with respect to information significantly affects rationale for product choice, and higher levels of knowledge are associated with choice rationale. Objective and subjective knowledge influence information processing differently. Inaccurate knowledge displayed by consumers influences their information processing behavior.

Research limitations/implications

While the survey stimuli are a realistic representation of two products, the online survey abstracts from in-store distractors that might influence behavior. The product chosen, while familiar and commonly consumed, is a low-involvement product which may reduce consumer effort.

Practical/implications

Marketers of organic foods must understand the level of knowledge held by consumers, as well as the information that most influences their choices if the industry is to grow further.

Originality/value

This study contrasts subjective and objective knowledge about organic foods and calculates the degree to which consumers under- versus over-estimate “organic” in their ignorance. As such, the research offers insight into a well-established label claim that has yet to achieve significant market share.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2008

Roberta Veale

The study seeks to quantify the ability of consumer knowledge (both objective and subjective) and personal self‐confidence to moderate consumer reliance on price and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to quantify the ability of consumer knowledge (both objective and subjective) and personal self‐confidence to moderate consumer reliance on price and country of origin (COO) when evaluating wine quality, when all intrinsic cues are experienced through sensory perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Taste testing experiments were conducted (N = 263) using unwooded chardonnay wine as stimulus, in a three (COO) × three (price) by three (acid level) conjoint analysis fractional factorial design. Specific measures were employed to quantify consumer objective knowledge, subjective knowledge and personal self‐confidence as clearly delineated constructs, in order to investigate the ability of each to moderate extrinsic cue usage.

Findings

Analysis revealed price and COO were both stronger contributors to perceptions of wine quality than taste, irrespective of knowledge (objective or subjective) or self‐confidence levels. Reliance was found to remain extremely consistent although objective product quality was manipulated to three differing levels in a controlled laboratory environment. The research clearly demonstrates that consumer belief in the price/value schema dominates quality assessment for consumers, with COO also found to be a strong influence. This is in spite of varying knowledge and self‐confidence levels.

Practical implications

Results show that marketers cannot assume that intrinsic product attributes, even when experienced, will be weighted and interpreted accurately by consumers – even those considered “knowledgeable”.

Originality/value

The research significantly advances our understanding of consumer knowledge (type and level) and their use of extrinsic cues (price and COO specifically), in relation to their respective influence in their determination of both expected and experienced quality.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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