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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Olukayode Lawrence Ayodele, Kazeem Oladele Sanusi and Mohamed Tariq Kahn

The nuclear battery technology depends on the spontaneous decay of the atomic nuclei of radioactive isotopes to generate electricity. One of the merits of a nuclear…

Abstract

Purpose

The nuclear battery technology depends on the spontaneous decay of the atomic nuclei of radioactive isotopes to generate electricity. One of the merits of a nuclear battery is its high-energy density, which can be around ten times higher than that of hydrogen fuel cells and a thousand times more than that of an electrochemical battery. A nuclear battery has an extremely long life and low maintenance and running costs coupled with applications in remote and hostile environmental environments. The rise of silicon technology has intensified research activities in the area of nuclear batteries. The paper aims to present a general overview of a nuclear battery.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a general overview of a nuclear battery and will significantly reduce reliance on non-renewable energy source. The requirement for long-lived power supplies have necessitated the pragmatic shift toward the realization of cleaner, safer and renewable energy sources.

Findings

Nuclear battery is a safe enabling technology for many applications including military and commercial applications. They have very long operating life under harsh environmental conditions. These cells demonstrate high potential for use in low power applications under a broad range of temperatures.

Originality/value

The nuclear battery technology has been receiving considerable in-depth research for applications that require long-life power sources.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Deborah Mongeau and Pamela Stoddard

As the 1960s drew to a close, Congress found itself grappling with an increasing array of complex technological issues that it was ill equipped to analyze and that could…

Abstract

As the 1960s drew to a close, Congress found itself grappling with an increasing array of complex technological issues that it was ill equipped to analyze and that could be the cause of costly blunders if acted upon incorrectly. To alleviate this situation, the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) was created in 1972 under Public Law 92–484 in order to advise Congress on issues in science and technology so that relevant information would be available when pertinent legislation was being developed. Under the leadership of its director John Gibbons, OTA has earned the distinction of providing Congress, that most political of bodies, with timely and objective information without becoming mired in political skirmishes. Despite this distinction, OTA is one of the smallest government agencies, with a budget of twenty million dollars and a staff of 140. Its organization is remarkable for its simplicity. A bipartisan congressional Technology Assessment Board governs the agency overall but appoints the director who has full responsibility for running it. The nine agency divisions are organized according to scientific disciplines and report to the director with little or no intervening bureaucracy. Outside expert advice is available from the Technology Assessment Advisory Council. The result is an organization that is equally balanced politically and scientifically, that is streamlined and efficient, and that allows input from its governing members. This structure also allows great flexibility in the research and production of assessment reports. To do an assessment, OTA deploys its experts to go out and gather the information needed on the wide‐ranging topics it has been commissioned to research. The topics are chosen according to the need and interest of both houses and both political parties. Outside experts are sometimes called upon to do research but OTA exercises the final responsibility over their reports. Factual conclusions and options are presented but opinions are never given. The manner in which the information is acted upon is always left to Congress, a major reason for OTA's success.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Alexander Bolonkin

This paper aims to suggest and research a revolutionary method‐transfer of electricity in outer Space with distance of hundreds of millions kilometers by ultra‐cool plasma cables.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to suggest and research a revolutionary method‐transfer of electricity in outer Space with distance of hundreds of millions kilometers by ultra‐cool plasma cables.

Design/methodology/approach

Methods of the plasma and electricity physic are used for research.

Findings

Theory of plasma cable transferring is offered, developed and its possibilities researched.

Research limitations/implications

This method uses a high voltage electricity and plasma source (accelerator).

Practical implications

Offers conclusions from the research of a revolutionary new idea‐transferring electric energy in the hard vacuum of outer space wirelessly, using a plasma power cord as an electric cable (wire). He computed the macroprojects: transference of hundreds kilowatts of energy to Earth's Space Station, transferring energy to the Moon or back, transferring energy to a spaceship at distance 100 million of kilometers, the transfer energy to Mars when one is located at opposite side of the distant Sun, transfer colossal energy from one of Earth's continents to another continent (for example, between Europe – USA) wirelessly – using Earth's ionosphere as cable, using Earth as gigantic storage of electric energy, using the plasma ring as huge MagSail for moving of spaceships.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on a revolutionary method for the transfer of electricity in outer space.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 79 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Specially designed robots are now being produced for exploration under the sea and for use in outer space. Some will become the forerunners of the “driverless vehicle” on earth.

Abstract

Specially designed robots are now being produced for exploration under the sea and for use in outer space. Some will become the forerunners of the “driverless vehicle” on earth.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Texas instruments has a cheap starter kit for newcomers to AI computing. For a mere £135, five video tapes of the highlights of the company's satellite symposia on AI are…

Abstract

Texas instruments has a cheap starter kit for newcomers to AI computing. For a mere £135, five video tapes of the highlights of the company's satellite symposia on AI are provided. Also included are “hands‐on” PC‐compatible demonstration software, a 35 mm colour slide presentation on the theory and benefits of AI, a set of literature which contains two copies of “Understanding Artificial Intelligence” — Texas Instrument's book on AI — and a copy of an issue of Intelligence, its AI newsletter. The company will provide full details; write to: TI/AI Starter Kit, PO Box 50, Market Harborough, Leicestershire, UK.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1964

THE re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The…

Abstract

THE re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The upheaval of staff, the loss of status for some senior officers, the general uncertainty for the future—these are very real consequences of the Act and they cannot be ignored. Many chief librarians will see the work of a lifetime, perhaps spent in building up a comprehensive and unified system, made virtually meaningless overnight.

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New Library World, vol. 66 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1964

The re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The…

Abstract

The re‐organisation of local government in Greater London and the resultant amalgamation of library authorities is viewed by many with considerable misgivings. The upheaval of staff, the loss of status for some senior officers, the general uncertainty for the future—these are very real consequences of the Act and they cannot be ignored. Many chief librarians will see the work of a lifetime, perhaps spent in building up a comprehensive and unified system, made virtually meaningless overnight.

Details

New Library World, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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