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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Barbara White, Greg Williams and Rebecca England

Technology provision and Next Generation Learning Spaces (NGLS) should respond to the active learning needs of twenty-first century learners and privilege multiple…

Abstract

Technology provision and Next Generation Learning Spaces (NGLS) should respond to the active learning needs of twenty-first century learners and privilege multiple ‘pictures of learning’ and associated knowledge work. In this sense it is important for NGLS to be pedagogically agnostic – agile enough to cater for a range of pedagogical approaches within the one physical space. In this chapter, the democratising and potentially disruptive power of new digital technologies to facilitate the privileging of these multiple pictures of learning is explored, recognising the significant rise in student ownership and academic use of mobile technologies. With their escalating ubiquity and their facilitation of active knowledge work, research around considerations for the implementation of mobile digital technologies is canvassed, highlighting a range of issues to be considered. This is part of the ‘hidden work’ of technology implementation. Without this hidden work, the potential of NGLS in facilitating and privileging active learning and multiple pictures of learning is diminished and the potential for reinforcing already powerful and potentially exclusionary modes of knowledge work increases. Finally to assist in articulating the hidden work of digitally enabled NGLS, a model is proposed to help understand how ease of use and confidence impacts on student and academic knowledge work.

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The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Davide Aloini, Loretta Latronico and Luisa Pellegrini

In the past decade, in the space industry, many initiatives intended at offering open access to big data from space multiplied. Therefore, firms started adopting business…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past decade, in the space industry, many initiatives intended at offering open access to big data from space multiplied. Therefore, firms started adopting business models (BMs) which lever on digital technologies (e.g. cloud computing, high-performance computing and artificial intelligence), to seize these opportunities. Within this scenario, this article aims at answering the following research question: which digital technologies do impact which components the BM is made of?

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory multiple case study approach was used. Three cases operating in the space industry that lever on digital technologies to implement their business were analyzed. Despite concerns regarding reliability and validity, multiple case studies allow greater understanding of causality, and show superiority respect to quantitative studies for theory building.

Findings

Big data, system integration (artificial intelligence, high-performance computing) and cloud computing seem to be pivotal in the space industry. It emerges that digital technologies involve all the different areas and components of the BM.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the impact that digital technologies have on the different BM components. It is only understanding which technologies can support the value proposition, which technologies make the infrastructural part able to support this proposition, which technologies may be helpful for delivering and communicating this value to customers and which technologies may help firms to appropriate the value that it is possible to seize the impact of digital technologies on BM.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Victor Dos Santos Paulino

– The topic of the risk associated with innovation is being investigated through the influence of technological risk on technology adoption.

Abstract

Purpose

The topic of the risk associated with innovation is being investigated through the influence of technological risk on technology adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the dynamics of technology adoption in high technology products thanks to several regressions. The paper uses data gathered from a major European space integrator.

Findings

The paper shows that a firm may implement a reliability-based inertia strategy under a specific context. This type of inertia strategy is rational and leads a firm to limit the adoption of new technologies and favours the reuse of proven technologies. This strategy is relevant to facing a risk of decrease in technical reliability.

Research limitations/implications

While the space industry displays some similarities with other capital good industries, it remains specific compared to mass production industries. The current paper should be considered as a preliminary research that aims at structuring the notion of inertia strategy.

Practical implications

In order to increase the commercial demand, the paper proposes that satellite manufactures adopt more intensive reliability-based inertia strategy and institutional demand asks for less experimental satellites.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to show that delays in technology adoption should not systematically be regarded as a weakness. Implementing a strategy that aims at slowing down technology adoption may sometimes improve firm survival. The paper also intends to provide a new insight to the paradoxical nature of change.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Chiara Verbano and Karen Venturini

In today's competitive market, organizations are increasingly aware of the need to exchange the technologies, experience and knowledge they have developed in order to…

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880

Abstract

Purpose

In today's competitive market, organizations are increasingly aware of the need to exchange the technologies, experience and knowledge they have developed in order to access new markets and revenue streams. They also recognize the need to acquire new technologies and knowledge from the external environment in order to exploit their ideas and create new products. Technology transfer (TT) is defined as the process for the passing and subsequent use of technology, expertise, know‐how or facilities for a purpose not originally intended by the developing organization. Above all, the transfer of space technology is recognized as complex, even though it is increasingly adopted: space technologies can, for example, be adopted for healthcare products, improved waste management and water recovery, as well as by manufacturers. Notwithstanding, few studies have focused on the TT process inside the space sector. The purpose of this paper is to verify which process and what determinants result in the transfer of space technologies to other industrial sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has the final aim of developing the model of a transfer path suitable for the space industry. Specifically, the authors investigated two cases of TT, which have been promoted by an Italian systems integration company and supported by the National Research Council (CNR) and the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

Findings

From an organizational viewpoint, some main differences related to the TT path emerge. Regarding the determinants, the study confirms other studies, i.e. that the most important determinants are the integrability, flexibility and high reliability of the technology, the availability of financial resources, followed by the technological versatility, and the level of R&D competences and knowledge of the receiver organization.

Originality/value

The technological innovation literature has, as yet, paid little attention to the TT process into non‐space areas from the space sector. In order to fill this gap, the paper contributes to broadening the knowledge base on the determinants for TT success in the space sector.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Sui Pheng Low and Xiu Ting Goh

The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the potential outer space technologies that can be used in the construction industry to enhance sustainability in buildings.

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9356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and identify the potential outer space technologies that can be used in the construction industry to enhance sustainability in buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

Outer space technologies developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the USA are explored for possible use in sustainable construction within the context of the Green Mark scoring system implemented by the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) in Singapore. NASA's voltage controller and self‐illuminating materials are identified and mapped with the energy efficiency criteria of the Green Mark Scheme. The mapping exercise suggests that Green Mark points can be enhanced through appropriate adoption of these technologies.

Findings

The Green Mark points that are re‐computed can show significant enhancements when the two potential outer space technologies are to be used in the building.

Research limitations/implications

National security and patent issues as well as related cost implications associated with the use of outer space technologies are not considered in the study. This may be a limitation because developers often deem costs to be an important consideration.

Practical implications

Appropriate outer space technologies do appear to enhance the assessment criteria in the Green Mark Scheme.

Originality/value

This exploratory study provides a bridge between outer space technologies and sustainable buildings. The study is original in that the bridge is the first ever attempt to further enhance the sustainability agenda, through additional Green Mark points, using potential outer space technologies developed by NASA.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Nicola Carr and Kym Fraser

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply…

Abstract

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply retrofitting an existing classroom as an NGLS conservatively costs $AUD200,000, while developing new buildings often cost in the region of 100 million dollars and over the last five years, many universities in Australia, Europe and North America have developed new buildings. Despite this considerable investment, it appears that the full potential of these spaces is not being realised.

While researchers argue that a more student centred learning approach to teaching has inspired the design of next generation learning spaces (Tom, Voss, & Scheetz, 2008) and that changed spaces change practice (Joint Information Systems Committee, 2009) when ‘confronted’ with a next generation learning spaces for the first time, anecdotes suggest that many academics resort to teaching as they have always taught and as they were taught. This chapter highlights factors that influence teaching practices, showing that they are to be found in the external, organisational and personal domains.

We argue that in order to fully realise significant improvements in student outcomes through the sector’s investment in next generation learning spaces, universities need to provide holistic and systematic support across three domains – the external, the organisational and the personal domains, by changing policies, systems, procedures and localised practices to better facilitate changes in teaching practices that maximise the potential of next generation learning spaces.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Eric D. M. Johnson

This chapter explores the recent trend in libraries: that of the establishment of spaces specifically set aside for creative work. The rise of these dedicated creative…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the recent trend in libraries: that of the establishment of spaces specifically set aside for creative work. The rise of these dedicated creative spaces is owed to a confluence of factors that happen to be finding their expression together in recent years. This chapter examines the history of these spaces and explores the factors that gave rise to them and will fuel them moving forward.

Methodology/approach

A viewpoint piece, this chapter combines historical research and historical/comparative analyses to examine the ways by which libraries have supported creative work in the past and how they may continue to do so into the 21st century.

Findings

The key threads brought together include a societal recognition of the value of creativity and related skills and attributes; the philosophies, values, and missions of libraries in both their long-standing forms and in recent evolutions; the rise of participatory culture as a result of inexpensive technologies; improved means to build community and share results of efforts; and library experience and historical practice in matters related to creativity. The chapter concludes with advice for those interested in the establishment of such spaces, grounding those reflections in the author’s experiences in developing a new creative space at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Originality/value

While a number of pieces have been written that discuss the practicalities of developing certain kinds of creative spaces, very little has been written that situates these spaces in larger social and library professional contexts; this chapter begins to fill that gap.

Details

The Future of Library Space
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-270-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Heather Michele Moorefield-Lang

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of 3D printing and maker spaces in various library settings. Insights, challenges, successes, projects as well…

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5352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation of 3D printing and maker spaces in various library settings. Insights, challenges, successes, projects as well as recommendations will be shared. Commonalities across libraries 3D printing technologies and maker space learning areas will also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper delves into six case studies of librarians that have implemented 3D printers and/or maker spaces in their libraries. The case studies focus on libraries at three different levels: school, public, and higher education with two case studies from each type. The author of this paper will describe the cases, projects, challenges, successes, along with other aspects of 3D printer, and maker space integration.

Findings

3D printing and maker spaces, while very popular in the field of librarianship can be incredibly exciting to implement but they come with challenges and successes just like any type of new technology. Librarians have to be fearless in implementing this technology, willing to learn on their feet, and be excited to explore.

Originality/value

At this time most publications on 3D printing are held in the realm of popular publications (blogs, magazines, zines, etc.). Very little has been written on a wider range of case studies where 3D printers and maker spaces have been integrated into libraries of various types. This paper sets the foundation for further exploration in how 3D printing and maker spaces could be a part of library services.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Ardis Hanson and John Abresch

Libraries can be seen as the collective identity of its employees engaged in providing a myriad of services to a community of patrons. Libraries can also exist in virtual…

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries can be seen as the collective identity of its employees engaged in providing a myriad of services to a community of patrons. Libraries can also exist in virtual settings, defined with descriptive parameters, described by a wider user group external to the library environment. The diverse nature of what constitutes libraries is illustrated by researchers, such as Marino and Lapintie (2015), who use the term “meta-meeting place” when describing its environs. Whatever model is used to describe contemporary libraries, the library environment usually has numerous needs and demands coming from a variety of stakeholders, from administrators to patrons. This chapter examines how we, as librarians, with users, co-construct library as both space and place.

Methodology/approach

We used a theoretical framework (social constructionism) to show how library identity is established by its users in the space planning process to address their needs and expectations and provided a case study of the main library at the University of South Florida.

Findings

We found that libraries are reflective of the vision and values of a diverse community and the social-political milieu in which they are housed. Librarians used a number of innovative methods and frames to create best/evidence-based practice approaches in space planning, re-envisioning library functions, and conducting outcomes/programmatic assessment. For librarians to create that sense of place and space for our users requires effective and open conversations and examination of our own inherent (and often unacknowledged) contradictions as to what libraries are or should be as enduring structures with evolving uses and changing users. For example, only a few of the studies focused on the spatial use and feel of libraries using new technologies or methodologies, such as social network analysis, discourse analysis, or GPS, to map the use of physical and virtual space.

Practical implications

First, new ways of working and engaging require reexamination of assessment and evaluation procedures and processes. To accomplish this, we must develop a more effective culture of assessment and to use innovative evaluation measures to determine use, user paths, and formal and informal groupings. Changes that affect patron and staff perceptions of library as place/third space may be difficult to assess using quantitative surveys, such as LibQual, that may not provide an opportunity for respondents to provide specifics of what “place” means to them. Second, it is important to have effective communication among all members of the library (patrons, library staff, and university administration) so that we design spaces/places that enhance the relationships among users, technology, pedagogy, and learning spaces, not just the latest “thing” in the literature.

Originality/value

This value of this review is to provide a social constructionist perspective (frame) on how we plan library space. This approach provides opportunities to truly engage our patrons and administration in the co-construction of what “our library” should be since it provides insight to group, place, and social dynamics.

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Abstract

Details

Communication as Gesture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-515-9

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