Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Tara Redding and Po-Ju Chen

A customer orders two bowls of soup at a Neighborhood chain restaurant and after paying is informed that the store is out of one of the soups. The customer refuses a…

Abstract

A customer orders two bowls of soup at a Neighborhood chain restaurant and after paying is informed that the store is out of one of the soups. The customer refuses a different variety of soup and insists she needs the original soup choice. The soup will be available again in one hour. What should the Neighborhood chain restaurant do?

Details

Trade Tales: Decoding Customers' Stories
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-279-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Zandra Reed and Christopher Strugnell

Downloads
358

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2018

Hélène B. Ducros

The purpose of this paper is to explore a grassroot festival in rural France organized around the concept of soup. The annual fête de la soupe held in a village in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a grassroot festival in rural France organized around the concept of soup. The annual fête de la soupe held in a village in Auvergne provides a small-scale example of the ways in which space, time and festivalization interact in placemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnographic research highlights the motivations and experiences of the organizers and volunteer-participants, as well as some of the organizational challenges.

Findings

Revealing that the profit motive and economic outcomes are not dominant, this paper shows instead that the fête constitutes a space of relation-building between place and people, between people themselves and an introspective moment over the past and future of place as “rural”. While preserving rurality symbolized and mediated by the exchange of soup as the ultimate peasant dish, the festival is also an opportunity for villagers to revitalize the rural and showcase it as a place of creativity.

Originality/value

The study addresses the experience of volunteers and organizers in festivals, uses qualitative methods to do so and focuses on festivals in the rural setting, filling three gaps identified by others in the literature.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

B. Franchini, R. Poínhos, K. Klepp and M.D.V. de Almeida

This paper's aim is to assess vegetable soup intake and its contribution to total vegetable intake among mothers of Portuguese schoolchildren as well as to examine the…

Downloads
225

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to assess vegetable soup intake and its contribution to total vegetable intake among mothers of Portuguese schoolchildren as well as to examine the association between relative vegetable soup intake and sociodemographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey was carried out in Portugal as part of the Pro Children study. In total 1,673 women, mothers of 11‐13 year old children, took part in the study. The vegetable intake and sociodemographic characteristics were collected with a self‐administered questionnaire in which a precoded 24‐hour recall was applied. The analysed sociodemographic characteristics were the number of people and composition of household, educational level, social class and region of residence. The associations between preferential or exclusive consumer mothers of vegetable soup (i.e. ≥50 per cent of total vegetable intake) and sociodemographic characteristics were analysed by a logistic regression model.

Findings

The mean intake of vegetable soup was 76.1 g/d and its contribution to total vegetable intake was approximately 45 per cent. The percentage of mothers that were preferential or exclusive consumers of vegetable soup was 41 per cent. Preferential or exclusive vegetable soup intake was less likely among mothers when the number of people in the household was less than four (vs 4; OR: 0.734, 95 per cent CI: 0.577‐0.934) and that did not live with their spouse/partner (OR: 0.617, 95 per cent CI: 0.424‐0.878).

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the consumption of vegetable soup, a traditional culinary preparation among Portuguese people. Also, it identifies factors associated with its consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Hengameh Hosseini

This paper aims to study the specific factors causing suburban-dwelling elderly American women to patronize different soup kitchens in Pennsylvania and investigate how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the specific factors causing suburban-dwelling elderly American women to patronize different soup kitchens in Pennsylvania and investigate how non-profit and government agencies could better meet the needs of this food-insecure population, to fill a significant gap in the growing literature on food insecurity in high-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted observational visits and structured interviews with over 200 patrons and staff of soup kitchens in two counties in the US state of Pennsylvania over visits spanning two years.

Findings

Elderly American women have very distinct soup kitchen needs and usage patters that differ from other patrons in eight key ways the authors identify. From these, the authors identify four central themes that food assistance reform in the US must address to improve the wellbeing of this subpopulation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors find that significant structural changes of the US food relief system must be made to better meet the needs of food-insecure elderly American women.

Practical implications

Soup kitchens should begin to offer information about federal programs, group transportation and other resources tailored to elderly women at soup kitchens to significantly improve their wellbeing, and help relieve the burden born by US non-profit food assistance organizations.

Originality/value

No studies to date have focused on the soup kitchen use of this specific population, whose needs, living circumstances, attitudes toward charity and socioeconomic realities differ significantly from other subpopulations of soup kitchen patrons.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Karin Doolan, Dražen Cepić and Jeremy F. Walton

The purpose of this paper is to explore charitable giving and receiving as a site of social class interaction in Croatia today, particularly in relation to the country’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore charitable giving and receiving as a site of social class interaction in Croatia today, particularly in relation to the country’s socialist past and capitalist present.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in three charity organisations in Croatia. The reported material is based on participant observation, interviews and informal conversations with organisation members, activists, employees and end users.

Findings

The authors find that charity activists and recipients of aid occupy distinct but overlapping moral economies in relation to questions of poverty, charity and the role of the state.

Originality/value

The authors develop a unique perspective on charitable giving and receiving in a context in which memories of socialism shape understandings of the role of the state today vis-à-vis poverty relief.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Jianping Liang and Vinay Kanetkar

This paper aims to improve understanding of the effects of price endings on consumers' choice behavior. The research study described here was driven by three central…

Downloads
3261

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve understanding of the effects of price endings on consumers' choice behavior. The research study described here was driven by three central questions. First, do consumers process a price holistically or process each digit as a stimulus? Second, do consumers “round” prices? Third, do price endings such as 9 or 0 have specific effects on purchase intentions?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a discrete choice experiment where consumers responded to two‐digit prices. Tomato soup and backpacks were the two product categories selected for the study. A total of 188 university students who had purchased these products completed an online survey indicating their choices for one of the four alternative products, with an option of not purchasing anything. Tomato soup prices were varied from 40 cents to 99 cents (every potential price ending was included) and backpack prices varied from $30 to $59 (no pennies). Each respondent made 20 choices for each product and the resulting database was used to construct the nested logit models.

Findings

Estimated models suggest that consumers do not process price holistically. In other words, respondents processed prices by splitting numbers into two parts. Furthermore, the use of truncation and the effects of “odd/even” and “0” appeared to be statistically significant for both canned soup and backpack products. Although there was rounding of prices for the soup category, there was no statistically significant support for that in the backpack category. Finally, the effect of a 9‐ending was statistically significant for the backpack category but not for the soup category.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that consumers may not process prices holistically. This, in turn, means that price endings are likely to influence consumer price sensitivity and both retailer and manufacturer profits.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that examines price endings for all numbers from 0 to 9. In addition, the use of a discrete choice modeling method to infer individual choice behaviour in this context is new and innovative.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2010

Carolyne J. White, Joelle J. Tutela, James M. Lipuma and Jessica Vassallo

In her children's book, Stone Soup, Heather Forest (1998) recreates a popular European folktale about people wanting to make soup but lacking the typical ingredients…. As…

Abstract

In her children's book, Stone Soup, Heather Forest (1998) recreates a popular European folktale about people wanting to make soup but lacking the typical ingredients…. As the story unfolds, they discover the possibilities that are available when individuals come together to make soup out of a stone and with the contribution of each member – a carrot, a potato – and “a magical ingredient…sharing.” Within this chapter, we tell our story of seeking national accreditation for the Urban Teacher Education Program (UTEP) at Rutgers University-Newark (RU-N)…. This story is crafted through personal experience narratives that illuminate the contribution of each author toward making our UTEP soup…. As in the story of Stone Soup…, we lack the typical ingredients to achieve accreditation, and we continue to make it happen.

Details

Tensions in Teacher Preparation: Accountability, Assessment, and Accreditation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-100-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Erol Ustaahmetoğlu

Although religiosity and advertising messages have been extensively examined in the existing literature separately, studies which correlatively examine both these aspects…

Abstract

Purpose

Although religiosity and advertising messages have been extensively examined in the existing literature separately, studies which correlatively examine both these aspects are very limited. This paper aims to reveal the influence of the widely used religious messages on consumer attitudes and of purchase intentions on subjects with different levels of religiosity.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, four different printed advertising messages with and without religious messages were developed for two different products. In this respect, the consumer attitudes toward advertisements and the degree to which purchase intention changed were measured.

Findings

The attitude and purchase intention toward the advertisements with religious messages was found to have a higher mean value compared to the advertisements without religious messages, and a statistically significant difference was found between the two. The highly religious participants’ attitudes and purchasing intention toward the advertisements with religious messages differed as compared to the participants with low levels of religiosity.

Research limitations/implications

Indeed, it was observed that the attitude toward different advertising messages and purchase intention differed regarding the level of religiosity. In the last section of the study, the influence of the level of religiosity on purchasing intention and consumer attitudes has been discussed with academic and practical results.

Practical implications

This study has also extended the practical implications of social judgment theory, which suggests that the further the consumers’ initial position to the new message the less is the acceptance of that message, and it contributes to its methodological and theoretical development. Whether a religious advertisement message is considered more or less acceptable depends on the level of religiosity and the positioning strategy adopted in the advertisement. In the present study, it is observed that as the level of religiosity increases, purchase intention and the attitude towards the advertisement with religious message increase in permissible(halal) goods. However, when prohibited (haram) services are considered, an increase in the subjects' level of religiosity brings about a decrease in the purchase intention and the attitude towards the advertisement with religious message. Therefore, this study validates social judgment theory.

Social implications

A significant implication for the marketing practitioners is that religiosity could be one of the criteria in segmenting market. A religiously prohibited product might gradually feel more irritating as the intensity of religious message increases in an advertisement. Thus, it is an important consideration for an organization offering faith-based products in mono-religious societies. Clearly, marketers need to be very careful when they use religious symbols in the secular marketplace, which raises the question – What factors underlie a positive response to religious message use in advertisement?

Originality/value

Religion was a taboo subject in society in the recent past; it has not been comprehensively investigated in marketing literature; moreover, it is evident that this situation continues to exist at present. It can, therefore, be said that the efforts to conceptualize religion’s influence on marketing and consumer behavior have been scarce.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Ed Russell, Anthony J. Adams and Bill Boundy

Test marketing has a long history: the precursor of all of today's market research methodologies was undoubtedly trial and error. However, it remains an area of vital…

Downloads
1880

Abstract

Test marketing has a long history: the precursor of all of today's market research methodologies was undoubtedly trial and error. However, it remains an area of vital interest today. The promise and the performance of high‐tech test marketing can be shown from the perspective of the Campbell Soup Company.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

1 – 10 of over 2000