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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Sweta Sinha and Shivendra Kumar Pandey

The present study aims to examine the moderation of the employee's age on the manifestation of “experience of hurt” to “commitment to future conflict” among the three…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to examine the moderation of the employee's age on the manifestation of “experience of hurt” to “commitment to future conflict” among the three intra-cohort segments of millennials. The study also examines the mediation of “perception of duplicitous organization” between hurt and “commitment to future conflict.”

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data was collected using survey method and analyzed by structural equation modelling on SPSS AMOS 25 software.

Findings

The results are based on single-source cross-sectional data. The result indicates that “perception of duplicitous organization” is positively impacted by the experience of hurt at the workplace. It also acts as a mediator between hurt and “commitment to future conflict”. There is significant moderation of age for all the relationships in the model. For instance, age moderates both the paths of hurt resulting in “perception of duplicitous organization” and aggressiveness, where the group of young employees have significantly higher path coefficients.

Practical implications

The managers need to be more considerate and interact frequently with the younger employees as they are more prone to develop aggression and are impressionable to form a “perception of duplicitous organization” after an experience of hurt. The manager needs to establish a high-quality relationship and a positive image of the organization with subordinates to prevent the manifestation of hurt to a “commitment to future conflict”.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge of the authors, this study is the first of its kind to study the moderation of age within the larger cohort of millennials.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Korak Bhaduri and Shivendra Pandey

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) development and terrestrial and marine protection on the economic…

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1430

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) development and terrestrial and marine protection on the economic and environmental sustainability of small-island tourism countries. The current study expands the smart specialisation literature in the context of small-island tourism nations. It also proposes sustainable future growth strategies for these countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted structural equation modelling using the data of 14 island nations between 1995 and 2014. The selection of countries was based on a set of criteria borrowed from literature.

Findings

The results indicate that the development of ICT infrastructure was not only associated with a higher inflow of tourists and a higher GDP per capita but also with a higher carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. Results also suggest that higher protection of terrestrial and marine areas has no impact on tourist inflows in tourism countries. Also, higher protection decreases the dependence of the total output on the tourism sector.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is the lack of available macro data on some other relevant variables for the countries studied.

Social implications

Following the findings of this study, the governments of these countries should make stringent environmental regulations and relax the telecom regulations for sustainable smart specialisation.

Originality/value

This study presents a novel insight into the sustainability challenge of island nations through the lens of smart specialisation. It also contributes to the literature on ICT and development.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2017

Shivendra Pandey, OP Wali and Rajan Chandra

The current study aims to evaluate the utilization of export incentives of the Indian Government. A model conceptualizing the relationships between incentive’s awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to evaluate the utilization of export incentives of the Indian Government. A model conceptualizing the relationships between incentive’s awareness, utilization, perception of utilization on export increase and overall performance was tested.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 107 Indian exporters from the ten major exporting sectors of the Indian economy were chosen. The exporters within the sectors were chosen on the basis of the quota sampling technique. The top-most executive of the exporting house was interviewed using both structured questionnaire and in-depth method.

Findings

Results indicated that awareness impacted availing of incentives which led to the perception of enhanced export sales. Enhanced export sales led to the perception of an enhanced overall performance of the firm. Smaller firms believed more as compared to larger firms in the effect of export incentives on export sales growth. Recommendations have been provided to remove lacunae in various incentive schemes and improve utilizations.

Research limitations/implications

The inability to extract firm-level financial data of the value of various schemes availed, exports sales increase, overall performance indicators is a limitation of the study.

Practical implications

The lack of awareness seemed to be the biggest roadblock for the Indian Government to make export incentive schemes successful. The Indian Government needs to customize the offerings of incentive schemes by incorporating the general perceptions of experts/users. Some less-used schemes can be done away with and some new schemes with less paperwork will be more useful.

Originality/value

There is scant literature in the Indian context on the study of export incentive schemes. There is even less empirical primary evidence available. This study is one of the first to provide a model for the utilization of export schemes and has great practical relevance for exporters and Indian Government alike.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Dheeraj Sharma, Shivan Sanjay Patel and Shivendra Kumar Pandey

This paper aims to explore franchisor–franchisee relationships in the context of plural forms. Plural forms implies the co-existence of franchised and non-franchised…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore franchisor–franchisee relationships in the context of plural forms. Plural forms implies the co-existence of franchised and non-franchised outlets of a given company. More specifically, the paper examines the impact of franchisors’ leadership styles on franchisees’ relationship commitment when the company franchised outlets co-exist with independent non-franchised outlets. Specifically, this study operationalize the plural forms phenomenon in franchising, using multi-channel complexity as a moderator. The mediating role of relational capital is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 254 franchisees. The hypothesized model was tested using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that all three – participative, supportive and directive leadership styles of franchisors increase relationship commitment. In a high channel complexity context, a supportive leadership style is the most effective, whereas, in a low channel complexity context, a participative style is the most effective. Relational capital also partially mediated the relationships between leadership styles and relationship commitment.

Practical implications

Franchisors should follow a participative leadership style when channel complexity is low. However, as they add new channels and the channel complexity increases, franchisors should shift toward a supportive leadership style to maintain existing franchisees’ commitment. In current environments, managers should avoid using directive leadership in favor of the other two leadership styles.

Originality/value

The present study is the first to examine the influence of channel leadership style on relationship commitment in an environment of multiple channel complexity.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Dheeraj Sharma, Madhurima Mishra, Shivendra Kumar Pandey and Koustab Ghosh

This study aims to examine the role of leader-member exchange social comparison (LMXSC) perceptions in triggering the instigation of uncivil behavior in the workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the role of leader-member exchange social comparison (LMXSC) perceptions in triggering the instigation of uncivil behavior in the workplace. This study also explores the intervening role of envy and the buffering role of aggression-preventive supervisor behavior within the proposed relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two phases separated by an interval of four weeks. The final sample consisted of 224 full-time white-collar employees working in five large pharmaceutical manufacturing organizations in India.

Findings

The findings indicate that employees’ subjective perceptions of being involved in poorer-quality LMX relationships than their workgroup members generate envy, which, in turn, evokes them to instigate uncivil behaviors onto those higher-LMX counterparts. The indirect effect of LMX social comparison on instigated workplace incivility through envy gets attenuated when supervisors engage in aggression-preventive behavior.

Practical implications

To protect organizations from the financial and productivity losses associated with incivility, supervisors are encouraged to exhibit aggression-preventive behavior if they form differentiated exchange relationships with the subordinates in their teams. Supervisors are further advised to avoid the altogether neglect of lower-LMX subordinates as doing so may give rise to negative emotions (envy) and behavior (incivility) among them.

Originality/value

This study expands the limited body of knowledge on the antecedents of uncivil employee behavior in the workplace. Specifically, it unveils that incivility toward coworkers may be stemming from unfavorable LMX social comparisons and ensuing negative emotions such as envy. It also offers insights on reducing uncivil behavior by highlighting that the impact of LMXSC and envy on incivility instigation gets buffered in the presence of aggression-preventive supervisor behavior.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2017

Arpita Khare and Shivendra Pandey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of green self-identity, green peer influence, service and product quality of organic food retailers on Indian consumers…

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2149

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of green self-identity, green peer influence, service and product quality of organic food retailers on Indian consumers’ perceived trust and transaction risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of consumers purchasing organic food products from organic food retailers. A mix of judgemental and convenience sampling was used.

Findings

Green peer influence, perceived organic food quality and service quality had a positive influence on perceived trust towards organic food retailer. Green self-identity had a negative influence on perceived transaction risk, and green peer influence had a positive effect on perceived transaction risk.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by organic food retailers to increase trust by improving organic food brands and service quality at the stores. The organic food market is in nascent stage and consumers’ trust towards organic food retailers is crucial in improving intention to purchase organic food. Peer influence should be used in cultivating trust towards products sold by organic food retailers.

Originality/value

The study adds to existing research by analysing the role of green self-identity, peer influence, organic food and service quality on perceived trust and transaction risk. The results can be used by retailers for marketing organic food brands.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Shivendra Kumar Pandey and Dheeraj Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to examine the sunk-time fallacy in the context of simultaneous variations of time and money when financial expenditures are recoverable. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the sunk-time fallacy in the context of simultaneous variations of time and money when financial expenditures are recoverable. The study compares a recoverable monetary scenario with conditions where money is either not spent or spent, but purchase and payment are decoupled.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 184 participants was utilised in three experiments. A randomised design was used, and experimental manipulations were achieved using the vignette method.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers are susceptible to sunk-time fallacy. Specifically, results suggest that there is no significant difference in sunk cost fallacy when a consumer spends only time vs when a consumer spends money and time both but money can be recovered. The sunk-time fallacy did not occur in credit card purchases. The sunk-time fallacy did not happen in temporal investments of less than a week but appeared in the temporal investments of two weeks.

Research limitations/implications

The study indicates that sunk-time fallacy occurs after a minimum threshold of time is spent on a particular activity.

Practical implications

Online retailers may vary the delivery period of ordered merchandise to reduce product returns. Online retailers may not deliver the merchandise too early to take advantage of the sunk-time fallacy. Bestseller products should be quickly delivered as there are lesser chances of product return. On the other hand, new products or products with mixed consumer reviews should be provided preferably with a time lag beyond a week. Managers should incentivise payments through debit card/net banking and cash-on-delivery to reduce returns by using sunk-time fallacy.

Originality/value

The study is perhaps the first one to study the sunk-time fallacy in a simultaneous variation of time and money where monetary costs can be recovered fully.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Ashish Gupta and Shivendra Pandey

The study aims to examine the moderating role of variety-seeking behaviour between customer engagement and its antecedents (customer satisfaction and customer value)…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the moderating role of variety-seeking behaviour between customer engagement and its antecedents (customer satisfaction and customer value). Further, this study also tests the existence of the value-satisfaction-engagement behaviour chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The perception of 262 respondents was used to examine the hypothesis using the structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The moderation effect of variety-seeking behaviour between customer satisfaction and customer engagement was found to be significant. Also, customer satisfaction fully mediated the relationship between perceived value and customer engagement, hence, empirically validating the value-satisfaction-engagement model in the retailing context.

Research limitations/implications

The findings draw managers' attention towards the segment of consumers who are more likely to be engaged, thus helping managers develop a more efficient and focussed strategy to achieve customer engagement. The result also suggests that variety-seeking buyers may not get engaged even after satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to empirically test the moderating role of variety-seeking behaviour to achieve customer engagement.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Shivan Sanjay Patel, Shivendra Kumar Pandey and Dheeraj Sharma

The present research aims to identify critical antecedents of willingness to pay (WTP) for traditional bundles (those comprising only goods or services) in an emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research aims to identify critical antecedents of willingness to pay (WTP) for traditional bundles (those comprising only goods or services) in an emerging market context. Further, it differentiates the relative importance of the determinants of customers' WTP according to the bundle type.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from Indian customers. The paper uses conjoint analysis with an orthogonal design. The experimental conditions were manipulated using vignettes.

Findings

The results indicated that purchase autonomy was considered the most important driver for customer's WTP in the case of traditional bundles. Quality variability, overall bundle quality and complementarity followed autonomy in the order of importance. Moreover, the interaction effects of autonomy and complementarity with bundle type significantly influenced the customer's WTP. Customers had a higher WTP for services bundle in high autonomy and goods bundle in high complementarity situations.

Practical implications

Retailers should allow customers to buy either the entire bundle or its components separately, irrespective of the type of traditional bundle. They should try to make bundles whose perceived quality varies significantly in the target customers. Retailers should try to keep complementary components in the goods-only bundle.

Originality/value

The present study extends the relationship of the WTP with its antecedents to traditional bundles. Earlier studies have only studied these relationships for hybrid (combination of goods and services) bundles. With the current study results, retailers can bundle traditional bundles (goods only and services only).

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Shivendra Pandey, Arpita Khare and Preshth Bhardwaj

Cosmopolitanism is on the rise in India and traditionally shoppers have been known to patronize local stores. There is a need therefore to see the effect of…

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2116

Abstract

Purpose

Cosmopolitanism is on the rise in India and traditionally shoppers have been known to patronize local stores. There is a need therefore to see the effect of cosmopolitanism and culture in context of loyalty towards local stores. Grocery items constitute major portion of purchase from local stores, therefore, pricing was also considered as a variable affecting store loyalty. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used conclusive approach using a structured questionnaire for survey. The sample consisted of 710 respondents. There was almost an equal representation of both genders and also of metropolitan and non-metropolitan consumers.

Findings

Culture and price affected local store loyalty directly. Cosmopolitanism was not found to have direct effect on loyalty. Within cultural dimensions, masculinity emerged as the most dominating trait. Minor modifications in cultural scale and major modifications in local store loyalty and cosmopolitanism are also suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses only on three factors: price, culture, and cosmopolitanism. It does not examine influence of variables like personal values, lifestyle, and personality on local store loyalty behaviour. The research did not examine relationship between nature and type of product purchase decisions and its impact on store choice.

Practical implications

Local stores need not be unduly worried with the incoming of organized players. The organized players should try to be cheaper and learn some tactics of local stores like customization, etc. There is a case for allowing FDI in multi-brand retail.

Originality/value

Cosmopolitanism not affecting the local store loyalty directly is the original contribution of the paper. The finding casts doubts on the growth strategy of organized retailers who are opening new stores with the thinking that cosmopolitan consumer will shop from them instead of local retailers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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