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1 – 10 of over 52000
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Maria Kümpel Nørgaard, Kathrine Nørgaard Hansen and Klaus G. Grunert

The purpose of this paper is to explore peer influence and the social and symbolic meaning that adolescents (10 to 16 years) attach to snacks; to investigate the relative…

2093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore peer influence and the social and symbolic meaning that adolescents (10 to 16 years) attach to snacks; to investigate the relative influence of peer influence compared to personal factors in explaining perceived importance of snack attributes; and to investigate age and gender differences in the peer influence process.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based survey distributed via e‐mail was combined with follow‐up focus groups including adolescents aged 10 to 16 years in Denmark.

Findings

The survey results show that the youngest adolescents and the girls perceived the highest influence from peers, and that peer social influence has more effect on what adolescents perceive as important snack attributes as compared to more personal factors. The focus group results show that adolescents purchase and consume snacks that support their self‐image when socializing with other peers.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should measure other aspects of peer influence and related social aspects regarding consumption settings.

Practical implications

The results in this paper may be useful to marketers developing social marketing campaigns aiming at reducing bullying among adolescents or promoting healthy snacking.

Social implications

Moreover, the results may help generate societal emphasis on the importance of social and self‐image aspects in consumption settings when it comes to adolescent snacking behaviour, healthy food choices and social development.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the emphasis on social and self‐image aspects.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Russell R. Currie, Franz Wesley and Paul Sutherland

The purpose of this study is to examine if an evoke set exists for pleasure travelers based on the past and future travel destinations of their peer groups.

5123

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine if an evoke set exists for pleasure travelers based on the past and future travel destinations of their peer groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers distributed a questionnaire to university students enrolled in the same program. The literature review suggests four ways in which peers can influence individuals: not to travel influence, direct influence, indirect influence, and shared goal of future destination influence. Results from the respondents provide data for correlation analysis based on these four types of peer influence.

Findings

The findings support previous researchers demonstrating a strong influence of peer reference groups on service purchase decisions, specifically tourism destination choice. Given a relatively small sample population, all four types of peer reference found support in the data.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are related to sample size and the homogeneity of the sample. Because, the respondents were in the same life stage, their peer groups were similar to all. Consequently, no comparative analysis specifically identifying peers and the degree of proximity at different stages of life was possible.

Originality/value

Very few studies focus specifically on the nature of peer group influence on service purchase behavior, related specifically with travel destination decision‐making. By recognizing travel patterns of individuals and understanding the influences causing these patterns, tourism marketers and planners have a greater understanding of the mechanisms of peer influence in pleasure travel destination choice.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

J. Lukas Thürmer, Maik Bieleke, Frank Wieber and Peter M. Gollwitzer

This study aims to take a dual-process perspective and argues that peer influence on increasing impulse buying may also operate automatically. If-then plans, which can…

4529

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to take a dual-process perspective and argues that peer influence on increasing impulse buying may also operate automatically. If-then plans, which can automate action control, may, thus, help regulate peer influence. This research extends existing literature explicating the deliberate influence of social norms.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 (N = 120) obtained causal evidence that forming an implementation intention (i.e. an if-then plan designed to automate action control) reduces peer impact on impulse buying in a laboratory experiment with young adults (students) selecting food items. Study 2 (N = 686) obtained correlational evidence for the role of norms, automaticity and implementation intentions in impulse buying using a large sample of high-school adolescents working on a vignette about clothes-shopping.

Findings

If-then plans reduced impulse purchases in the laboratory (Study 1). Both reported deliberation on peer norms and the reported automaticity of shopping with peers predicted impulse buying but an implementation intention to be thriftily reduced these links (Study 2).

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the role of automatic social processes in problematic consumer behaviour. Promising field studies and neuropsychological experiments are discussed.

Practical implications

Young consumers can gain control over automatic peer influence by using if-then plans, thereby reducing impulse buying.

Originality/value

This research helps understand new precursors of impulse buying in understudied European samples of young consumers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Robert Opoku

The role that peer influence plays in shaping young adult consumers' products purchase decision cannot be overemphasized. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

1658

Abstract

Purpose

The role that peer influence plays in shaping young adult consumers' products purchase decision cannot be overemphasized. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of peer influence in shaping young adult male consumers' product purchase decisions in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure peer influence in this study, a survey of around 200 university students aged between 16 and 30 was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Constructs were measured using well‐established scales. Hypotheses are tested by investigating and comparing mean levels of the susceptibility of these young adults to peer influence across four product categories.

Findings

With the products studied, the overall preliminary results suggest that the levels of influence were greater in normative influence than in informational situations. The results further provide a sense of the degree to which peer influence on purchase decision could be dictated by culture.

Practical implications

Based on the results of this study, practical implications for marketing strategies are suggested and future research directions proposed.

Originality/value

The paper adds richness to the peer influence theory from a unique culture such as Saudi Arabia, which is also under‐researched.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Zhen Li, Soochan Choi and Jeffrey Yi-Lin Forrest

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of peer pressure on joint consumption decisions among emerging adults. Building on prospect theory and characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of peer pressure on joint consumption decisions among emerging adults. Building on prospect theory and characteristics of emerging adulthood, the authors propose that influence from peers (i.e. informational and normative influence) serves as a channel to understand how peer pressure shapes joint consumer behaviors at different levels of social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey is distributed to the emerging adults, aged 18 to 25, in the south, west, east and middle of the USA. Construct validity and reliability are tested by using confirmatory factor analysis. Structural equation modeling is used to test the mediating and moderating effects.

Findings

The results show that social capital moderates the relationship between peer pressure and group-oriented consumer decisions, such that the relationship is positive in groups with high-level social capital but negative in groups with low-level social capital. Furthermore, such effects tend to be achieved via peer influence. And peer influence is stronger in groups with high-level social capital than those with low-level social capital.

Originality/value

The current literature has shown contradictory results: it is usually believed that emerging adults may conform to pressure and engage in group-oriented decisions; however, some research has reported the opposite result. To better understand this relationship, the authors aim at a group-level factor – perceived social capital – as a boundary condition. This research contributes to the young consumer decision-making literature by involving the interplay among peer pressure, perceived social capital and peer informational and normative influence.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2022

Yuanyuan Hu and Jiali Fang

This study investigates whether corporate executives, who are university alumni, influence each other's firm corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates whether corporate executives, who are university alumni, influence each other's firm corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on social network theory, the authors hypothesise that a firm's CSR performance is positively associated with its peer firms' average CSR performance when the executives of the firm and its peer firms are university alumni. The study employs data from 1,685 listed firms and 4,906 executives who graduated from 585 different universities in China and runs multivariate regressions.

Findings

The results reveal a sizeable university peer influence on CSR performance. Such influence is even stronger for executives who graduated from elite universities (e.g. 985 or 211 universities), and universities or programmes that provide more opportunities for alumni reunions or networking (e.g. MBAs/EMBAs). Executives who are more influential in making firm decisions (e.g. CEOs/CFOs), as well as firms that are more likely to mimic the behaviour of others, also show higher degrees of university peer influence.

Practical implications

The results highlight the role of education in ethical decision-making.

Originality/value

This study documents evidence on a new determinant of firm CSR performance. The study sheds light on the impact of non-institutionalised personal ties, for example, university alumni networks, on CSR performance.

Details

China Accounting and Finance Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1029-807X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Rebecca J Wetmiller

This study seeks to identify the role that peer team members' behaviors and superiors' preferences play in influencing the likelihood that staff auditors engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to identify the role that peer team members' behaviors and superiors' preferences play in influencing the likelihood that staff auditors engage in dysfunctional audit behavior (DAB).

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an experiment that manipulates peer team member behavior (DAB present or DAB absent) and superior preference (efficiency or effectiveness). Students enrolled in a graduate accounting course, proxying for inexperienced staff auditors, receive an internal control sample selection task. Participants assess the likelihood that a typical staff auditor would engage in DAB or non-DAB.

Findings

First, staff auditors with a peer team member who engages in DAB are more likely to engage in DAB. Second, staff auditors who have a superior with a preference toward efficiency are more likely to engage in DAB. Finally, when considered simultaneously, the effect of the superior's preference on the likelihood of staff auditors engaging in DAB is not different for staff auditors, subject to a peer engaging in DAB versus those subject to a peer who engaged in a non-DAB.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a hypothetical audit team, a written script of team member communication, and students proxying for inexperienced staff auditors. As such, future studies might consider improving the realism of the team setting, the manner in which a message is portrayed, and implications at higher levels within the audit team hierarchy.

Practical implications

Team interactions contribute to the prevalence of DAB within the profession. Specifically, inexperienced auditors are influenced by the behavior of peer and superior team members and this may be one cause of the prevalence of DAB within the profession. As such, future firm considerations could include well-structured mentorship programs and rewards structures.

Originality/value

This study adds to the audit team literature by investigating the influence of audit team dynamics on staff auditors' behaviors. This paper extends the current audit team literature, that is mostly focused on supervisor–subordinate relationships, by investigating social influences from peers and superiors. This study's findings inform public accounting firms of areas in which personnel may negatively affect audit quality through intra-team interactions.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2017

Arpita Khare and Shivendra Pandey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of green self-identity, green peer influence, service and product quality of organic food retailers on Indian consumers…

2664

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of green self-identity, green peer influence, service and product quality of organic food retailers on Indian consumers’ perceived trust and transaction risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of consumers purchasing organic food products from organic food retailers. A mix of judgemental and convenience sampling was used.

Findings

Green peer influence, perceived organic food quality and service quality had a positive influence on perceived trust towards organic food retailer. Green self-identity had a negative influence on perceived transaction risk, and green peer influence had a positive effect on perceived transaction risk.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by organic food retailers to increase trust by improving organic food brands and service quality at the stores. The organic food market is in nascent stage and consumers’ trust towards organic food retailers is crucial in improving intention to purchase organic food. Peer influence should be used in cultivating trust towards products sold by organic food retailers.

Originality/value

The study adds to existing research by analysing the role of green self-identity, peer influence, organic food and service quality on perceived trust and transaction risk. The results can be used by retailers for marketing organic food brands.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Mallory D. Minter, Monica A. Longmore, Peggy C. Giordano and Wendy D. Manning

Prior researchers have documented significant effects of family violence on adult children’s own risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Yet, few studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior researchers have documented significant effects of family violence on adult children’s own risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Yet, few studies have examined whether exposure to family violence while growing up as well as emerging adults’ reports of their current peers’ behaviors and attitudes influenced self-reports of intimate partner violence perpetration. The current study based on interviews with a large, heterogeneous sample of men and women assessed the degree to which current peers’ attitudes and behaviors contributed to risk of intimate partner violence perpetration, net of family violence.

Methodology/approach

Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) (n = 928), we examined associations between family violence indicators, peers’ behaviors and attitudes, and self-reports of intimate violence perpetration among adults ages 22–29. We used ordinary least squares regression and controlled for other known correlates of IPV.

Findings

For men and women, we found a significant relationship between witnessing parental violence during adolescence and IPV perpetration in emerging adulthood, and a positive relationship between current peers’ IPV experiences and attitudes and respondents’ perpetration. We also found that for respondents who reported higher, compared with lower, peer involvement in partner violence, the effects of parental violence were stronger.

Originality/value

We provided a more comprehensive assessment of peers’ IPV to this body of research, which tends to focus on family violence. Studies have examined peers’ attitudes and behavior during adolescence, but we extended this work by examining both peer and familial influences into emerging adulthood.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2016

Kirsten Scully and Miguel Moital

The purpose of this paper is to examine peer influence in the context of purchasing collectively consumed products. The particular focus of the paper is on strategies used…

1217

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine peer influence in the context of purchasing collectively consumed products. The particular focus of the paper is on strategies used by university students for persuasion and resistance when attending events and festivals.

Design/methodology/approach

Five females and three males studying for a degree in the UK were interviewed. Independent analysis of the interview transcripts was undertaken to identify persuasion and resistance strategies, as well as the factors influencing a strategy’s success.

Findings

A number of persuasion and resistance strategies are used and certain strategies use specific language techniques. Some of these strategies are only applicable to reference groups who have a history of consuming products together, as they resort to past experiences as a means of producing a persuasion or resistance argument. The extent to which the influence is successful is also discussed as being very subjective and dependent on the particular context of the persuasion exercise.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to exclusively examine peer influence in the context of collectively consumed products, notably influence and resistance strategies and the conditions which can make these effective. The paper illustrates the types of strategies peers use when attending events, in particular those used by people who live in a fairly close social system (university study) and where there is no formal hierarchy (in contrast with parent–children influence). The context can influence the types of strategies used, for example, the nature of the relationship between students, which is based on high levels of trust, makes it inappropriate to use certain strategies.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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