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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Sheila Roy and Indrajit Mukherjee

In the context of sequential multistage utilitarian service processes, the purpose of this study is to develop and validate propositions to study the impact of service

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of sequential multistage utilitarian service processes, the purpose of this study is to develop and validate propositions to study the impact of service quality (SQ) perceptions developed in intermediate stages, along with the impact of service gestalt characteristics, such as peak and end experiences, on quality perception at each stage and on overall service quality (OSQ) perception. The cascade phenomenon (interdependency between process stages) is considered in the evaluation of OSQ perception of customer, who experiences service through a series of planned, distinct and partitioned sequential stages.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a conceptual framework is used to evolve the propositions. Subsequently, propositions are tested in three different utilitarian service contexts wherein customer survey was conducted for feedback on attributes at each stage, summary perception evaluations of each stage and OSQ evaluation of multistage process. Peak experiences, considered for OSQ evaluation, were defined by a suitable statistical technique. Ordinal logistic regression with nested models is the technique used for analyzing the data.

Findings

This work reveals significant cascade effect of summary evaluation of intermediate stages on the subsequent stage. Peak customer experience (negative or positive) is observed to be marginally significant on intermediate stage and OSQ evaluation. In addition, OSQ is observed to be influenced by summary perception evaluations of intermediate stages, which leads to better model adequacy. Finally, among all the stages, end stage performance is observed to have a significant impact on the overall multistage SQ.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that in view of the cascade effect of intermediate stages, managers need to allocate resources to ensure that all stages are performing at an adequate level instead of only focusing on improving peaks and end effects of customer experiences. The proposed approach is easy to implement and suitable for evaluating SQ and OSQ in varied multistage sequential utilitarian service environment.

Originality/value

An integrated approach for evaluation of SQ in sequential multistage utilitarian service processes is proposed from the perspective of cascade effect of intermediate stages and peak and end effects on OSQ perception.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Chunchang Xie and Ziqi Sun

In response to the call for research on customer experience across the customer journey, this study aims to analyze and compare the effects of perceived quality on…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the call for research on customer experience across the customer journey, this study aims to analyze and compare the effects of perceived quality on customer satisfaction among the different stages of search, experience and credence services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper constructs a formation model of customer satisfaction based on service stages. Data on perceived quality and customer satisfaction in different stages of search, experience and credence services was collected through experiments and practical survey and the model was empirically tested through multiple linear regression.

Findings

The results show that perceived quality in the preparation and departure stages of search and credence services has a greater influence on customer satisfaction than in the delivery stage. While compared to the preparation stage, the perceived quality in the delivery and departure stages of experience service has a greater influence on customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

This research will help service firms optimize the allocation of service resources according to the importance of different service stages within the three indicated service types, promoting customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to compare the effects of perceived quality on customer satisfaction among the stages of search, experience and credence services.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Yang Zhao, Ruoxin Zhou and Yinping Ci

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key factors influencing the service innovation of mobile social networks (MSNs), figure out the mechanism of all factors in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key factors influencing the service innovation of mobile social networks (MSNs), figure out the mechanism of all factors in different stages of service innovation and help mobile social application developers promote better service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

From previous research, this paper adopted nine initial factors that influence the service innovation of MSNs, and divide the service innovation process into three stages (i.e. demand analysis, service design and innovation implementation). On that basis, the authors constructed a model, and then collected data from 184 managers from 20 leading MSN corporates in China through questionnaires to examine the model. Furthermore, factor analysis was used to extract key factors influencing the service innovation of MSNs, correlation analysis was employed to discuss the relationship among factors and regression analysis was applied to explore their specific roles in different stages in the service innovation process.

Findings

The empirical results show that the service innovation of MSNs is mainly influenced by five key factors: user, developer, market environment, social environment and technology. The authors found that different factors played remarkably different roles in the three stages. In specific, all factors but technology are important in the demand analysis stage; all factors but social environment are critical to service design; and all factors but user contribute to the implementation of service innovation.

Practical implications

The results of this study can help mobile social application developers and mobile social service providers in China to better understand the driving force of service innovation and what should be emphasized in different stages, and then find the optimal path to implement service innovation, improve their service quality and user experience and facilitate the development of Chinese MSNs.

Originality/value

This is the first research that comprehensively explores factors influencing the service innovation of Chinese MSNs from multi-dimensional perspectives, which provides profound theoretical guidance to the practice of service innovation in China. Also, it contributes to the development of innovation theory of traditional web services.

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Wenhui Fu, Qiang Wang and Xiande Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to explore the properties of platform service innovation and its relationship to value co-creation activities and the network effect. This is…

3784

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the properties of platform service innovation and its relationship to value co-creation activities and the network effect. This is done over the course of a platform’s evolution through three stages: emergence, expansion and maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on grounded theory, this study adopts a multiple case study research design. An in-depth analysis of the case data is done using ATLAS.TI software.

Findings

At the emergence stage, platform service innovations focus on building infrastructure. Platform owners stimulate the network effect directly via platform service innovations, rather than indirectly via value co-creation activities. At the expansion stage, the platform service innovations focus on building relationships among platform owner and different sides of participants. Platform owners stimulate the network effect indirectly, via value co-creation activities, rather than directly via platform service innovations. At the maturity stage, platform service innovations focus on building an environment for the platform ecosystem. Platform owners stimulate the network effect indirectly, via value co-creation activities rather than directly.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the service innovation literature by exploring the properties of platform service innovation and its relationship to value co-creation activities and the network effect from a longitudinal perspective. The principal managerial implication is that platform managers need to consider the developmental stage of the platform, as a mismatching of stage of development (emergence/expansion/maturity) and focus (an orientation toward building infrastructure, relationships or environment) may lead to a failure to stimulate or enhance the network effect.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Abdullah J. Sultan

This research aims to identify critical brand touchpoints that generate value for customers and brands and examine their effects on two relational outcomes: relationship…

1207

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to identify critical brand touchpoints that generate value for customers and brands and examine their effects on two relational outcomes: relationship quality and word of mouth (WOM).

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies combining qualitative and quantitative research provide evidence distinguishing four different stages of customer experience in the telecom industry and develop a research model of staged customer experience; structural equation modeling analyses are used to validate the proposed model and test for the examined effects.

Findings

Customer experience in the telecom industry consists of four related but distinct stages (i.e. pre-touch, in-touch, post-touch and service failure) and these stages have direct and indirect effects on WOM. Furthermore, the effects of customer experience stages on WOM are partially mediated by relationship quality.

Research limitations/implications

The research model introduced here will allow academics and practitioners to focus their efforts on important touchpoints that influence relationship quality and WOM. Future research should examine the proposed model of staged customer experience in different applications and industries.

Practical implications

A common myth among marketers is that firms should design a painless experience if they want a superior market position. While avoiding a drain on financial resources, the prime objective should be to provide a holistic customer experience that is valuable to customers and the brand alike. Marketers should disregard touchpoints and stages that do not provide noticeable value.

Originality/value

This research answers the call for a more appropriate model to elucidate the factors that link customer experience with relational outcomes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Paulina Papastathopoulou, Spiros P. Gounaris and George J. Avlonitis

The paper aims to offer a preliminary insight into the issue of whether service providers eliminate their offerings in various stages of their life cycle, and if so…

1099

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to offer a preliminary insight into the issue of whether service providers eliminate their offerings in various stages of their life cycle, and if so, whether elimination decision‐making differs depending on the service's life cycle stage.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were secured by means of a structured questionnaire which was completed through personal interviews. Respondents answered all questions having a recently eliminated service in mind. The initial calls and follow‐up efforts generated 164 usable responses (49.8 per cent response rate).

Findings

A service may be eliminated from a service provider's portfolio in any stage of its life cycle. Further, in terms of precipitating circumstances, evaluation factors and elimination strategies, the service elimination process differs depending on the stage of the service life cycle that the elimination decision is taken.

Practical implications

The most important implication is service providers eliminate services not only as a response to a crisis possibly caused by drops of sales volume, but also for other reasons. In this respect, service portfolio rationalization and particularly service elimination may result as a consequence of strategic management decisions taken for positive (e.g. development of a new service) or negative (e.g. competitive actions) reasons. Within this framework, the service life cycle (SLC) model, as a strategic tool for analysis and decision‐making, may well serve to guide the rationalization process.

Originality/value

The research questions of the study have been examined for tangible products, but this is the first relevant study that is conducted in a service context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Breffni M. Noone, Sheryl E. Kimes, Anna S. Mattila and Jochen Wirtz

Restaurant operators can process a greater number of customers and increase revenues by reducing service encounter duration during high demand periods. Actions taken to…

8646

Abstract

Purpose

Restaurant operators can process a greater number of customers and increase revenues by reducing service encounter duration during high demand periods. Actions taken to reduce duration may be experienced by customers as an increase in the pace of the service encounter. While achieving a reduction in duration may be appealing from a revenue perspective, will customers' perceptions of the resulting pace of the service encounter negatively impact their satisfaction? The aim of this paper is to propose that, in the context of restaurant experiences that are hedonic and extended in nature, the overall relationship between perceived service encounter pace and satisfaction follows an inverted U‐shape.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents were asked to recall a recent (i.e. within the last three weeks) restaurant experience, write a description of that experience, and then complete scales that measured their perceptions of pace and satisfaction with the experience.

Findings

The relationship between perceived pace and satisfaction has an inverted U‐shape. This holds both at the level of the overall service encounter and by service stage within the encounter. The effect of perceived pace on satisfaction is moderated by service stage, with a greater tolerance of a faster pace during the post‐process stage than during the pre‐process or in‐process stages.

Practical implications

The results of this study have implications for the application of revenue management strategies for duration control. Management need to consider the negative effect that service encounter pace can have on consumer satisfaction. Service stage should also be factored into strategy development for duration control.

Originality/value

This paper extends the wait time literature, demonstrating that as the perceived pace of the service encounter increases, satisfaction increases, but only up to a point, beyond which it decreases as perceived pace continues to increase.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Xiaoyan Xu, Miao Hu and Xiaodong Li

This study aims to help businesses cope with consumers' no-show behaviour from a multistage perspective. It specifically identifies no-show reasons at each stage of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to help businesses cope with consumers' no-show behaviour from a multistage perspective. It specifically identifies no-show reasons at each stage of appointment services and proposes the corresponding coping strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

By focusing on an outpatient appointment service, we interviewed 921 no-show patients to extract no-show reasons, invited 18 hospital managers to propose coping strategies for these reasons using a Delphi method and evaluated the proposed strategies based on EDAS (Evaluation based on Distance from Average Solution).

Findings

The results reveal ten reasons for no-show behaviour (i.e. system service quality, overuse, did not know the appointment, self-judgment, forget, waiting time, lateness, uncontrollable problems, time conflict and service coordination), which have nine coping strategy themes (i.e. prepayment, system intelligence, target, subjective norm, system integration, ease of navigation, reminder, confirmation and cancellation). We classify the ten reasons and nine themes into scheduling, waiting and execution stages of an appointment service.

Originality/value

This study provides a package of coping strategies for no-show behaviour to deal with no-show reasons at each appointment service stage. It also extends the research in pre-service management through appointment services.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Piyush Gupta, Amit Sachan and Rajiv Kumar

Based on social science theories of customer's action such as theory of planned behaviour, theory of reasoned action, and technology acceptance model, this paper adopts…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on social science theories of customer's action such as theory of planned behaviour, theory of reasoned action, and technology acceptance model, this paper adopts belief–attitude–intention model to study impact of perceived process-belief of different stages of e-service delivery system process (e-SDSP), i.e., searching process belief (SPB), agreement process belief (APB), fulfilment process belief (FPB) and after-sales service process belief (ASPB) on customer attitude and intention towards service providers. The study also focuses on the mediating effect of customer attitude on the relationship between process-beliefs of different stages of e-SDSP and their behavioural intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method has been employed using data collected from 414 Indian e-retail customers. Structural equation modelling with bootstrap estimation is used to find the mediating effect of attitude.

Findings

The findings suggest that SPB and ASPB directly impact the customer attitude while APB and FPB directly impact the customer behavioural intention. The study also finds that customer attitude towards e-retailers fully mediates the effect of SPB and ASPB on the behavioural intention but there are no mediating effects for APB and FPB.

Research limitations/implications

The sample used may not be generalizable for India, given its huge diversity and population. As the sample considers only Indian e-retail customers, this study may lack generalizability across countries.

Originality/value

In our knowledge, this study is the first step to conceptualize the process-oriented customer's perceived belief of different stages of e-SDSP and how these beliefs impact the customers' attitude and intention towards the e-retailers. The findings offer insight to managers on how they can create and cultivate customer happiness and positive behavioural intention by enhanced customer journey throughout the e-SDSP.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Rhonda L. Hensley and Joanne Sulek

The purpose of this study is to examine the relative importance of customer perceptions of waits in a multi‐stage service.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relative importance of customer perceptions of waits in a multi‐stage service.

Design/methodology/approach

The stages included the wait at the point of service‐entry, the wait during the service stage in which the core service was experienced and the wait at the service‐exit stage as the customer was preparing to leave. Satisfaction with the waits and satisfaction with the core service product, employees' behavior and the physical setting were examined in relation to customers' perceptions of service quality. Four measures of customers' perceptions of service quality were used in this study. These included overall customer satisfaction, willingness to recommend the service to friends, willingness to bring friends to the service and repatronage intentions. A survey was developed based on a review of the literature and in collaboration with the manager of a full‐service restaurant. The survey was administered during the course of the meal by restaurant employees. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the extent to which satisfaction with each wait affected the four customer perceptions of service quality.

Findings

Results showed that the only wait satisfaction that consistently affected customer perceptions of service quality involved the service‐entry wait.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to empirically examine the effect of service waits at multiple stages of a service operation on perceptions of service quality.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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