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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Scott P. Foster and Karen Dye

A recent article in Strategy + Business magazine set out that the three primary goals of the CEO for creating ‘business resilience’ include (1) securing the people of the…

1507

Abstract

A recent article in Strategy + Business magazine set out that the three primary goals of the CEO for creating ‘business resilience’ include (1) securing the people of the enterprise; (2) securing the core business of the enterprise (systems, facilities, infrastructure and processes); and (3) securing the business networks (such as the supply chain). Given these three goals, who is better suited to take on a leadership role in coordinating business continuity than the senior managers of corporate real estate (CRE) and workplace resource (WR) organisations? For several years, as the concept of Corporate Infrastructure Resource Management (CIRM) has evolved, senior CRE managers have sought out ways to create additional value for the enterprise’s core businesses. The authors believe that CRE organisations possess many of the competencies required to play significant roles in their business continuity programmes, and seizing this opportunity to fill the gaps can elevate the profile of workplace to the executive level. This paper presents a simple framework, based on five leverage points, that will enable CRE to take a more active leadership role in managing business continuity and to move to a ‘strategy and continuity’ model for managing corporate real estate.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Francisco J. Acoba and Scott P. Foster

In their recent client engagement experience and benchmarking research, the authors have found that successful management models for corporate real estate (CRE) organisations…

1202

Abstract

In their recent client engagement experience and benchmarking research, the authors have found that successful management models for corporate real estate (CRE) organisations begin with integrated, robust processes, and not well designed organisational charts. As corporate missions can quickly change focus from high growth to cost reduction, the key to successful integration of all CRE elements is engaging in a strategic planning process that not only aligns the facilities infrastructure with the core business, but also drives CRE organisational initiatives relative to processes, people and enabling systems. This paper attempts to capture a practical framework for CRE managers to evaluate changes to the core business and determine what implications these changes will have on both the CRE portfolio and organisation.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2023

Scott Foster, Trang Ly Thien, Anna Jayne Foster, Thi Hanh Tien Ho and Sarah Knight

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of wellbeing within the university education system by outlining the key issues and benefits and recognising future…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of wellbeing within the university education system by outlining the key issues and benefits and recognising future research on digital well-being for students. The JISC Digital wellbeing paper highlights the many positive and negative impacts associated with digital wellbeing. This paper explores how some of these features have been considered within institutions within the UK and Vietnam and highlights the emerging research in one Vietnamese institution in relation to student wellbeing, where digital wellbeing was identified as a key concern.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a technical review article which summarises key guidance for organisational digital wellbeing and then reflects on the application in the UK (a developed economy) and in Vietnam (one of the fastest growing economies). This is the first time a review has been conducted from the perspective of different countries. There are two aspects to digital wellbeing, individual and the social or organisational perspectives.

Findings

The JISC Digital wellbeing paper highlights the many positive and negative impacts associated with digital wellbeing. This paper explores how some of these features have been considered within institutions within the UK and Vietnam and highlights the emerging research in one Vietnamese institution in relation to student wellbeing, where digital wellbeing was identified as a key concern. The context of digital wellbeing within higher education is then discussed drawing similarities between the UK and Vietnamese student experiences whilst acknowledging the limitations of current research within the field.

Originality/value

Many institutions have seen a rise in the number of wellbeing challenges, and there are few examples of specific initiatives aimed at addressing digital wellbeing challenges for their stakeholders. Existing research on students' wellbeing is predominately focused on undergraduate students and does not differentiate between undergraduate and postgraduate students, nor between masters, doctoral and professional level students and does not explore the impact of digital wellbeing discretely; this is an area which would benefit from future research.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Scott Foster and Anna Foster

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the emerging spirituality debate with the aim of generating and sustaining tolerance for spirituality in the workplace, with a…

5676

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the emerging spirituality debate with the aim of generating and sustaining tolerance for spirituality in the workplace, with a specific focus upon the impact this can have upon work-based learners. “Spirituality” is gaining impetus worldwide as a growing number of organisations are proactively accommodating their multi-ethnic and multi-faith workforce by adapting their policies to meet employees’ spiritual needs. As yet in the UK, the majority of organisations fail to recognise neither the basic spiritual well-being of their employees nor the impact this can have upon work-based learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative approach with questionnaires distributed to a multi-national retail UK-based organisation with an ethnically diverse national workforce. The study was tested by collecting data from managers and employees of this large, multi-million pound retail chain organisation in the UK, consisting of 55 stores and 1,249 employees, in order to gather employees’ perceptions on spirituality within their place of work regarding policies, communication and perceived source of conflict.

Findings

The results revealed that the majority of employees deemed spirituality was not something they felt comfortable discussing or appropriate to practice within the workplace and there were no clear policies and procedures in place to support either management or employees.

Research limitations/implications

This paper highlights areas for further research in the broad professional areas of spirituality in relation to organisational approaches to work-based learning. The research is from one organisation and utilising one method – qualitative research would add depth to the knowledge.

Practical implications

This paper highlights areas for further research in the broad professional areas of spirituality in relation to organisational approaches to work-based learning.

Originality/value

Employee spiritual well-being is under-researched and overlooked by organisations. Changing the current spiritual intransigence is long overdue as employees’ spiritual fulfilment leads to high-trust relationships in the workplace and can further support those engaged in work-based learning.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

Nadeem Ali El-Adaileh and Scott Foster

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic literature review to determine the factors that relate to successful business intelligence (BI) system implementation.

15488

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a systematic literature review to determine the factors that relate to successful business intelligence (BI) system implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has a collection of literature that highlights potential references in relation to factors for system implementation in relation to BI. There is the employment of “content analysis”, given that the study purpose is the achievement of deep understanding of the variety of factors of implementation that other researchers have previously identified.

Findings

An initial investigation of 38 empirical studies on the implementation of BI led to ten factors being compiled. Difficulties in implementation were found to exist in relation to the operationalisation of large numbers of factors within organisations. The implementation factors were analysed and then sorted into a descending order based upon their frequency of occurrence.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to consider BI implementation factors. Moreover, literature is collected from selected databases and journals from 1998 to 2018.

Practical implications

Researchers of BI may, within the future, develop models for the measurement of the implementation level of BI within industries along with the sustaining of them. Moreover, work-based learning industries can benefit by adopting the results of this study for the effective implementation of BI. The implementation factors can be seen as key constructs upon which there may be the undertaking of more statistical analyses.

Originality/value

The original output from this research can help researchers’ in the future in enhancing identification of studies that are relevant for the review of literature for their research.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Tony Wall

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2005

Michael G. Hillard

Labor management cooperation, and the adoption of high-performance work systems (HPWS), are central topics in recent industrial relations research, with much emphasis given to…

Abstract

Labor management cooperation, and the adoption of high-performance work systems (HPWS), are central topics in recent industrial relations research, with much emphasis given to “best-practice” success stories. This paper uses a case study analysis, relying on conventional, and oral history interviews, to explore why managers, union leaders, and workers in two Maine paper mills rejected the cooperation and the HPWS model. It explores how local history and culture, regional factors like the dramatic International Paper (IP) strike in Jay, Maine, instability in industry labor relations, management turnover, and instability in corporate governance contributed to these two mills’ rejection of Scott Paper Corporation's “Jointness” initiative during the period from 1988 to 1995. The study argues that intra-management divisions blocked cooperation on the management side, and that the Jay strike created a “movement culture” among Maine's paper workers, who developed a class-conscious critique of HPWS as a tactic in class warfare being perpetrated by paper corporations.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-265-8

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Crystal T. Lee and Sara H. Hsieh

With the rapid surge of mobile marketing, an increasing number of brands have launched branded emoticons in an attempt to build brand relationships with consumers. Despite the…

1671

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid surge of mobile marketing, an increasing number of brands have launched branded emoticons in an attempt to build brand relationships with consumers. Despite the apparent promise of branded emoticon usage, there is only limited academic research on branded emoticons. This paper aims to build on impression management theory and the conceptualization of cuteness to investigate how the effect of cuteness in branded emoticon design influences perceived playfulness in mobile instant messaging (MIM) interaction and the creation of brand engagement in self-concept.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumers with usage experience of branded emoticons in MIM apps were recruited to complete an online survey. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Two facets of cuteness – kindchenschema cuteness and whimsical cuteness – can project a favourable social image to consumers that facilitates playfulness in social interaction and enhances brand engagement in self-concept, which leads to their willingness to purchase the brand and stickiness to the MIM apps.

Originality/value

The popularity of branded emoticons represents a new form of social interaction and an innovative way to build brand relationships. The present study is the first to examine the design aspects of branded emoticons and highlights that the cuteness of a branded emoticon may be a crucial factor in engaging consumers in MIM.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Per Forsberg and Anna-Karin Stockenstrand

The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge about how resistance to the neo-liberal agenda is made possible, especially through renewal and reproduction of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge about how resistance to the neo-liberal agenda is made possible, especially through renewal and reproduction of collective communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two ethnographical studies, one of a chamber orchestra and one of a shipping company for illustrating resistance.

Findings

It is resistance through distancing and creation of a “hidden script” that prevents the collective community from be broken down by individualization. However, resistance through distancing needs to be combined with resistance through persistence in order to become intelligent.

Originality/value

The paper makes use of ethnographic studies to investigate possibilities of resistance. The study has also found it fruitful to combine James Scott's (1990) notion of collectively created hidden scripts with Collinson's (1992, 1994) notion of resistance through distancing and persistence.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Odd Rune Stalheim

This paper aims to examine how pedagogical innovations in practical training facilitate professional learning among higher education (HE) students.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how pedagogical innovations in practical training facilitate professional learning among higher education (HE) students.

Design/methodology/approach

Through individual and group interviews and observations, this explorative phenomenological study investigates a technological innovation in nursing education and a student-driven innovation in architectural education, which provide the background for discussion on the potential of professional development through innovative work-based learning (WBL).

Findings

The findings revealed that increased involvement and engagement through innovative WBL in real-life scenarios increases students' confidence in their abilities, their critical commitment to their education and their professional knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the number of participants, which reduces the opportunity to compare results based on, e.g. the different roles of the students or their enrolment status. However, few studies address the students' voices in innovation processes; therefore, the results offer valuable knowledge to inform development work in HE.

Practical implications

The results suggest a stronger emphasis on “scholarship of practice” to increase attention to practice and professional knowledge as a formalised part of the core tasks in HE.

Originality/value

The paper showcases the importance of a learning paradigm that includes students in innovation processes and underscores the value of pedagogical innovation in WBL for students' professional development.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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