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Article

Davis Folsom

Market intelligence is critical to marketing strategy planning forany business. While considerable study has been made of theintelligence‐gathering practices of large…

Abstract

Market intelligence is critical to marketing strategy planning for any business. While considerable study has been made of the intelligence‐gathering practices of large corporations, very little research has been reported focusing on the competitive information activities of small businesses. The research involved a survey of small business owners and managers in South Carolina, USA. The study addressed three questions: What market intelligence practices do small businesses use? What market intelligence practices do they think their competitors use? How important is market intelligence to small businesses? The market intelligence practices most frequently used are observing competitors and talking with suppliers or delivery people. Small business owners were least likely to use practices such as job interviews or hiring competitors′ employees to gain information. Respondents perceived their competitors as being more likely to pursue market intelligence activities. If a firm used a specific practice, they thought their competitors did also. Among small business owners market intelligence does not appear to be a critical management concern.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Annie Green

The purpose of this paper is to propose a logical approach to identifying and modeling business intelligence from corporate information.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a logical approach to identifying and modeling business intelligence from corporate information.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology or approach to identifying business intelligence is based on the cross‐pollination of eight business value drivers. Modeling business intelligence from the hybrid blends of value sources provides a view of business intelligence in more realist dimensions.

Findings

Modeling business intelligence from the hybrid blends of value sources provides a view of business intelligence in more realist dimensions.

Originality/value

Business enterprises are challenged with identifying the primitive components that construct business intelligence within the business. The conceptual model presented in this paper decomposes to the primitive level of information or meta‐data needed to model business intelligence. The primitive level defines the business objects and provides a map to defining the actual business information to capture.

Details

VINE, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article

Yu Yin Lim and Ai Ping Teoh

This paper posits that business intelligence (BI) utilization is a strategic resource that significantly impacts the business sustainability of Public Listed Companies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper posits that business intelligence (BI) utilization is a strategic resource that significantly impacts the business sustainability of Public Listed Companies (PLCs) listed on Bursa Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a systematic review of the concepts related to business intelligence utilization. Then, the issues of PLCs business sustainability in Malaysia are reviewed. This paper subsequently argues the consequences of business intelligence utilization.

Findings

Based on the synthesis of the key points, this paper justifies the strategic impact of business intelligence utilization on the business sustainability of Malaysian PLCs.

Practical implications

This paper provides significant knowledge for business practitioners to gain insights into the critical role of business intelligence utilization and its strategic impact on business sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper dissects the strategic impact of business intelligence utilization from the perspectives of enhancing economic performance, environmental performance, and social performance.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article

Jan P. Herring

Business leaders in Japan, Western Europe, and Latin America believe that the chief executives who lead their companies into the twenty‐first century will have to be…

Abstract

Business leaders in Japan, Western Europe, and Latin America believe that the chief executives who lead their companies into the twenty‐first century will have to be fluent in several languages, have extensive international business experience, and will have to cope with an increasing level of international competition. The Japanese leaders considered foreign competition as the primary threat—hence, their emphasis on the importance of language skills and global experience.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Article

Mikael Hellström and Ulf Ramberg

The purpose of this paper is to address the perceptions senior public leaders in local government have regarding the need for business intelligence and their perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the perceptions senior public leaders in local government have regarding the need for business intelligence and their perceptions of the extent to which their organizations are capable of effectively assimilating business intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are from a survey on local governments’ need for and capability to use business intelligence, with a response rate of 50.5 percent, and semi-structured interviews. The survey method originates from private sector research but is adapted to local government conditions in Sweden.

Findings

The leaders’ perceptions about the need for business intelligence were fragmented. Their perceptions regarding its use were even more fragmented, both between different municipalities and within municipalities.

Research limitations/implications

The survey is adapted to local government conditions in Sweden and may need further changes to fit other settings. The adaptation and renewal of questions can lead to summation errors in relation to the original survey.

Practical implications

The paper highlights some of the strategic areas where senior public leaders need to advance their business intelligence and prioritize specific organizational capabilities. The dominant logic, enhancing an inward-looking approach, seems to prevent a more thoroughgoing business analysis.

Originality/value

The adaptation of a method that is mainly used in the private sector can give new perspectives to senior public leaders regarding the need for and use of business intelligence and can help them identify the factors that can affect the complexity and volatility in local government settings.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article

Jan P. Herring

Business intelligence (BI) activities have increased significantly in the US over the past five years—but mainly at the practitioner's level. For various reasons, senior…

Abstract

Business intelligence (BI) activities have increased significantly in the US over the past five years—but mainly at the practitioner's level. For various reasons, senior managers in US companies have not adopted intelligence as a strategic management discipline. As a direct result, the use and effectiveness of BI operations in US firms remain questionable. Until senior executives become more interested and involved in the use of BI, the competitiveness of US companies will be limited by their inability to understand and outthink global competitors.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

René Pellissier and J.‐P. Kruger

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which strategic intelligence is utilised within the South African long‐term insurance industry and whether it could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which strategic intelligence is utilised within the South African long‐term insurance industry and whether it could be used to identify opportunities or threats within the global environment to remain competitive, create greater innovation, and corporate advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this paper is to obtain the qualitative views and opinions of strategic decision makers, on an executive managerial level within the South African long‐term insurance industry, on their organizations' use of strategic intelligence.

Findings

There are marked differences in the conformity and usage of strategic intelligence and its components between the organizations surveyed, with a measurable difference between large and small organizations, however, it is generally viewed that the use of a strategic intelligence framework could greatly enhance decision making.

Research limitations/implications

Data collection was limited to the 82 long‐term insurance companies which were registered with the South African Financial Services Board, with a focus on the organizations listed on the Johannesburg Securities Exchange within the Life Assurance Sector, within which a final response rate of 36.1 per cent was achieved, including the 100 per cent response rate from the six listed organizations.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the extent to which strategic intelligence is utilised in the South African long‐term insurance industry, and identifies the benefits or problems that are experienced by implementing and using strategic intelligence as an input to the strategic management process and what value strategic intelligence adds in the decision‐making process.

Originality/value

The identification and utilisation of the most important factors of a strategic intelligence framework will greatly enhance global corporate decision making and result in competitive advantage and constant innovation within the South African business environment.

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Article

Jan P. Herring

To compete more effectively with global challengers, U.S. companies must begin to develop corporate intelligence systems.

Abstract

To compete more effectively with global challengers, U.S. companies must begin to develop corporate intelligence systems.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Henry F.L. Chung

Research focusing on the relation between market orientation and innovation in the Asian emerging economy is limited. The purpose of this study is to advance the extant…

Abstract

Purpose

Research focusing on the relation between market orientation and innovation in the Asian emerging economy is limited. The purpose of this study is to advance the extant literature by investigating the relations among market orientation, guanxi networking and innovation using the MARKOR scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conclusion is drawn based on the experience of 122 Asian emerging market firms operating in a wide variety of industrial sectors. This study explores whether the three MARKOR components (intelligence generation, dissemination and responsiveness) and their interaction with business and political guanxi have a significant effect on firms’ strategic innovation success. Innovation is measured following the practice of the OECD. In addition to the quantitative analyses, this study conducted qualitative interviews with executives of eight respondent firms, to further consolidate the subjects under investigation. The integration of both qualitative and quantitative data enriches the conclusions drawn from the study.

Findings

The findings of this study confirm that, when operating in an Asian emerging economy, both intelligence generation and responsiveness have a positive and direct impact on innovation. Though intelligence dissemination has no direct influence on innovation, its alignment with business and political guanxi still leads to a positive effect on innovation. The coalition of responsiveness and political guanxi, however, has a negative influence on innovation. The results of this study add new insights to the extant literature and provide implications for future research and marketing practices in Asian emerging economies.

Originality/value

The findings of this study confirm that, when operating in an Asian emerging economy, both intelligence generation and responsiveness have a positive and direct impact on innovation. Though intelligence dissemination has no direct influence on innovation, its alignment with business and political guanxi still leads to a positive effect on innovation. The coalition of responsiveness and political guanxi, however, has a negative influence on innovation. The results add new insights to the extant literature and provide implications for future research and marketing practices in Asian emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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