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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Alonzo M. Flowers III and Rosa Banda

In an attempt to understand the postsecondary and occupational pathways of minorities who choose to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM…

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Abstract

Purpose

In an attempt to understand the postsecondary and occupational pathways of minorities who choose to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pathways, what this paper offers is an examination of literature that focuses on identity. More specifically, this paper aims to present a research argument that highlights the importance of self-efficacy as it relates to the creation of a science identity for minority students. The authors, in other words, posit that self-efficacy, particularly as it relates to the cultivation of a science identity remains a critical and under-examined component of the STEM success puzzle for underrepresented students.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework used for this paper is taken from two bodies of literature that are used to provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between self-efficacy and science identity – self-efficacy, is grounded in social cognitive theory which posits that achievement is rooted in the bidirectional interaction between behavior, personal factors (e.g. cognitive, affective and biological) and external environment (Bandura, 1986).

Findings

Developing an understanding of the science identity development for students of color is essential because it helps construct a connection to the belief that science has value and that the student is capable to engage in the sciences successfully.

Originality/value

This analysis widens the scholarly discussion on STEM success for students of color to be inclusive of the critical role that the cultivation of a STEM identity plays in their transition from students at a collegiate level to professionals at a workforce capacity.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Aroutis Foster, Mamta Shah, Amanda Barany and Hamideh Talafian

This paper aims to report findings for the following question, “What is the nature of high school students’ identity exploration as a result of exploring the role-possible…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report findings for the following question, “What is the nature of high school students’ identity exploration as a result of exploring the role-possible selves of an environmental scientist and urban planner in a play-based course?” Projective reflection (PR) is served as a theoretical and methodological framework for facilitating learning as identity exploration in play-based environments.

Design/methodology/approach

From 2016-2017, 54 high school freshmen students engaged in virtual city planning, an iteratively refined course that provided systematic and personally relevant opportunities for play, curricular, reflection and discussion activities in Philadelphia Land Science, a virtual learning environment (VLE) and in an associated curriculum enacted in a science museum classroom. Participants’ identity exploration was anchored in targeted role-possible selves in science, technology, engineering and mathematics: environmental science and urban planning through in-game and in-class activities. This role-playing was made intentional by scaffolding students’ reflection on what they wanted to be in the future while thinking of their current selves and exploring novel role-possible selves.

Findings

In-game logged data and in-class student data were examined using quantitative ethnography (QE) techniques such as epistemic network analysis. Whole-group statistical significance and an illustrative case study revealed visual and interpretive patterns of change in students’ identity exploration. The change was reflected in their knowledge, interest and valuing, self-organization and self-control and self-perception and self-definition (KIVSSSS) in relation to the roles explored from the start of the intervention (starting self), during (exploring role-possible selves) and the end (new self). The paper concludes with directions to advance research on leveraging role-playing as a mechanism for fostering identity exploration in play-based digital and non-digital environments.

Originality/value

This paper leveraged VLEs such as games as forms of play-based environments that can present players with opportunities for self-transformation (Foster, 2014) and enculturation (Gee 2003; Shaffer, 2006) to support learner agency and participation in a constantly changing society (Thomas and Brown 2011). The authors introduce and apply novel theoretical and methodological approaches to the design and assessment of play-based environments and address pertinent gaps in the emergent area of learning and identity in VLEs

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Regina Kelly, Oliver McGarr, Louise Lehane and Sibel Erduran

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether or not females believe they associate with the culture of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify whether or not females believe they associate with the culture of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by investigating the perceptions of female students currently enroled in STEM courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents data from a survey on female STEM students’ “Perspectives of women in STEM”, “Parents’ Science qualification”, “Supports in their STEM Course” and their “Science identify” through a social capital lens. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The main findings were that female STEM undergraduates believe social bias, balancing work and family life and lack of role models are the main cause of less women in STEM professions and leadership positions. There were statistically significant differences between how male and female students identified with certain traits, with less females claiming to be intelligent and know about latest discoveries than males.

Research limitations/implications

To eradicate stereotypical views of scientists, it is recommended that Irish higher-education institutions introduce initiatives to increase the socialisation of STEM females within female networks and develop female students’ self-awareness of their own capabilities. The expansion of STEM networks could act as a means to facilitate female students adopting positive science identities, increasing their science capital.

Originality/value

In Ireland, there is a paucity of literature relating to females’ experience of STEM in higher education. This paper provides evidence that despite their engagement with STEM, female undergraduate students subscribe to the stereotypical image of the scientist. This study highlights the need to change the culture experienced by female STEM undergraduates in Ireland so as to improve the experiences and trajectories of women in higher education.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2015

Jumoke Ladeji-Osias, Christine Hohmann, Stella Hargett, Lisa Brown, Cleo Hughes-Darden and Michel Reece

Morgan State University (Morgan) is a leading undergraduate institution for black science and engineering doctoral degree recipients. Morgan also is a leader in the…

Abstract

Morgan State University (Morgan) is a leading undergraduate institution for black science and engineering doctoral degree recipients. Morgan also is a leader in the production of black engineering degree recipients in the United States. This chapter provides a historic overview of the major programs with a tie to the impact on the institutional metrics, a discussion of the process for developing researchers in science and engineering, and alumni perspectives. The undergraduate research development models used in engineering at Morgan are compared and contrasted with the life sciences and physical sciences. The programs focus on developing communities of engineering practice and communities of science, thereby enhancing students’ self-efficacy and resilience, shaping disciplinary identity, and creating learning communities. These approaches are critical for the success of minority students and are supported by the social science literature. Best practices have been adopted at varying levels by the School of Engineering, the School of Computer Mathematics and Natural Science and the Behavioral Science departments that have netted these Ph.D. outcomes including multiyear mentored research, research training courses, and participation in professional meetings. Multiple approaches to student development, when matched with the disciplinary culture, are shown to result in national impact.

Details

Infusing Undergraduate Research into Historically Black Colleges and Universities Curricula
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-159-0

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Anneleen Van Boxstael and Lien Denoo

We advance theory of how founder identity affects business model (BM) design during new venture creation and contribute to the cognitive perspective on BMs. We look at BM…

Abstract

We advance theory of how founder identity affects business model (BM) design during new venture creation and contribute to the cognitive perspective on BMs. We look at BM design as a longitudinal process involving a variety of cognitive work that is co-shaped by the founder identity work. Based on an in-depth nine-year process study of a single venture managed by three founders, we observed that a novelty-centered BM design resulted from cognitive work co-shaped by founder identity construction and verification processes. Yet, more remarkably, we noted that founder identity verification decreased over time and observed a process that we labeled “identity-business model decoupling.” It meant that the founders did not alter their founder identity but, over time, attentively grew self-aware and mindfully disengaged negative identity effects to design an effective BM. Our results provide a dynamic view on founder identity imprinting on ventures’ BMs and contribute to the identity, BM, and entrepreneurship literatures.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Farin Kamangar, Gillian B. Silver, Christine Hohmann, Shiva Mehravaran and Payam Sheikhattari

The focus of this chapter is to describe the methods and results of ASCEND, an innovative program that empowers undergraduate students to lead research projects. ASCEND…

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is to describe the methods and results of ASCEND, an innovative program that empowers undergraduate students to lead research projects. ASCEND, which stands for “A Student-Centered Entrepreneurship Development Training Model to Increase Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce,” is funded by the National Institutes of Health and is being implemented at Morgan State University, a historically black university in Baltimore, Maryland. The results are thus far very promising and show that placing undergraduate students in leading research positions and surrounding them with like-minded peers enhances their sense of science identity, leadership, peer support, and research capabilities. It is hoped that students who participate in ASCEND will pursue graduate training and become future successful biomedical researchers.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Craig C. Brookins, Erin R. Banks and Amy Leonard Clay

This chapter describes the Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (IMSD), a National Institutes of Health-funded research training program at North Carolina State…

Abstract

This chapter describes the Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (IMSD), a National Institutes of Health-funded research training program at North Carolina State University (NCSU). IMSD is designed to increase the number and success of student Scholars from groups underrepresented in the biomedical and behavioral sciences. The NCSU-IMSD program provides financial support for both undergraduate and graduate students and utilizes a holistic approach that engages students in both academic and nonacademic professional development activities. Undergraduate IMSD Scholars are placed in research labs with faculty and graduate mentors during the entire academic year as well as the summer, and seeks to create a sense of community across cohorts. Unlike similar programs at other research-extensive universities, NCSU-IMSD is housed in the graduate school and serves students across multiple departments and colleges. This location provides greater opportunities for interdisciplinary interaction between student Scholars and is a model that enhances institutional commitments to diversity in the research sciences. This chapter describes these key program dimensions and provides guidelines for doctoral institutions seeking to enhance the experiences of underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students in the biomedical and behavioral sciences.

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Özlem Aracı

Organizations face various situations that require to give decisions. There are many factors that influence their decisions. Organizational identity is one of the factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations face various situations that require to give decisions. There are many factors that influence their decisions. Organizational identity is one of the factors that can be used as an interpretive schema for decisions. Not only for decisions but also for recognition, legitimacy, allocating the organization among the others organizational identity is viewed as a construct that organizations want to protect. This study aims to contribute to measurement of organizational identity.

Design/methodology/approach

National, daily newspapers were chosen as sample for the study. Influence of organizational identity on decisions is highly reflective for newspapers. When they face conflicting demands, they tend not to make any concession from their identities. They want to behave in compliance with their identities. To reveal organizational identity orientation of newspapers, data were collected based on the 18 interviews with executive editors of newspapers.

Findings

Content analysis was concluded with ten categories that help in understanding organizational identity orientation. These ten categories were grouped within two broad orientations as business oriented and journalism oriented organizational identity. These categories reveal not only average organizational identity orientation of newspapers industry but also the variations in organizational identity orientation between newspapers.

Research limitations/implications

Limitation of the study is the way to reveal organizational identity orientations studied on only newspapers. Undoubtedly, using this method for other organizations that operate in different industries, contributes to the generalizability of findings.

Originality/value

Significance of the study is to reveal a method to measure organizational identity orientation based on content analysis approach.

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Christopher Emdin, Edmund Adjapong and Ian Levy

This paper aims to argue that providing youth of color with opportunities to explore content while reflecting on and sharing mental health concerns is an under-focused…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that providing youth of color with opportunities to explore content while reflecting on and sharing mental health concerns is an under-focused dimension of teaching and learning that has the potential to positively impact these students’ academic achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a qualitative study to interrogate a teaching/learning model through a hip-hop-based science program.

Findings

Because urban youth of color are traditionally most disengaged in STEM and also the ones who are the least likely to seek or be provided with mental health tools/services, it is suggested that there is a connection between their low academic achievement and the absence of opportunities for them to address emotions that impact their academic success. Furthermore, if these youths come from communities where mental health stressors are highly prevalent, and teaching is most restrictive, a model for teaching that considers practices that address both their academic and mental health needs becomes necessary.

Research limitations/implications

This work does not intend to devalue or undermine the role of school counselors or traditional teachers. It is believed that the role of the school counselor or social worker when youths identify themes that go beyond the scope of personal challenges is significant and that these professionals should be made available when engaging in this type of work. It is also believed that the educator who may not be privy to hip-hop can successfully engage in this type of activity with STEM students. Finally, the use of science as an exemplar for engaging in this work does not indicate that the other STEM disciplines cannot or should not explore this type of model.

Practical implications

The paper outlines a model that other educators/researchers may use and suggests ways that this brand of research may be implemented by scholars across the country.

Social implications

Through the implementation of the hip-hop-based science program as an intervention in science classrooms, students are provided the opportunity to bolster science content knowledge and knowledge of self. In addition, utilizing the hip-hop-based science program created an avenue for teachers to develop better understanding of students and their full socioemotional selves. This is especially necessary in STEM education where perceptions of students’ decisions to not engage in the disciplines are directly related to our collective unwillingness to present the subject matter in a way that goes beyond the glorification of its stoic and “old white” history.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a new dimension of STEM research through an exploration of hip-hop culture and youth emotions.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw and Jillian L. Wendt

The unequitable representation among genders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers remains a persisting challenge. Peer mentoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The unequitable representation among genders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers remains a persisting challenge. Peer mentoring has been cited as one method for supporting women and racial and ethnic minorities in becoming interested in, experiencing self-efficacy in and persisting in STEM. The current study was undertaken to explore how and in what ways peer mentors' participation in the program (namely, the mentoring experience) influenced their STEM self-efficacy beliefs, interests, skills and behaviors, including their intent to persist and actual persistence in STEM.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multisite case study design, the current study implemented a blended peer mentoring program at two historically black institutions.

Findings

The experience in the peer mentoring process increased mentors' self-efficacy, career interest, perceived mentoring skill development in most areas and intent to persist in STEM. Evidence from the interviews and open-ended survey questions demonstrated that the peer mentoring experience had a direct influence on the mentor's self-efficacy, career interest, leadership and professional skills and persistence. The thematic analysis of the data sources revealed that specific elements of the peer mentoring experience influenced mentors' beliefs, interests, skills and behaviors, including recognition, functioning as a mentor, developing an other's orientation, engaging in a sisterhood and developing competencies.

Originality/value

Findings support the benefit of the blended peer mentoring program model among women who identify as a racial or ethnic minority across two historically black college or universities (HBCUs). Peer mentoring programs should include training to increase competencies and skills, should provide resources targeted to specific mentor needs and should include opportunities for self-reflection and components of faculty support.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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