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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, Serge Gabarre, Bilal Eneizan and Nabihah Asri

This paper aims to identify the factors of willingness to pay for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia by extending the theory of planned behaviour with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the factors of willingness to pay for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia by extending the theory of planned behaviour with knowledge and religiosity.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to Muslim consumers at Malls in Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya. From 250 Muslims who were approached, 200 respondents agreed to answer the questionnaire. SMART-PLS 3.2.8. was used to analyse the data for this study using a structural equation modelling (SEM) approach.

Findings

Attitude (ATT), Subjective Norm (SN) and Perceived Behavioural Control (PBC) have a positive relationship with the Willingness to Pay (WTP). However, religiosity is found as an insignificant factor towards the WTP. Knowledge and religiosity are significant predictors of the attitude. Attitude is found to have a mediating effect on the relationship between knowledge and the WTP, and for religiosity towards the WTP. Awareness moderates the positive relationship between ATT and the WTP for halal transportation services. Meanwhile, awareness is found as an insignificant moderator between SN and the WTP, and for the PBC and the WTP.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information on the WTP for halal transportation. Related parties such as the government, halal transport service providers and customers can use these findings to plan further action to enhance the WTP for halal transportation

Originality/value

The study reveals the capability of the TPB to identify the factors of WTP for halal transportation among Muslim consumers in Malaysia. The findings also show the moderation effects of awareness on the TPB. The findings also enrich the literature on the WTP in halal studies

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Stanislav Ivanov and Craig Webster

This paper aims to investigate potential consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality, and the factors that shape their…

1027

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate potential consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality, and the factors that shape their willingness to pay.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey yielded a sample of 1,573 respondents from 99 countries. Independent samples t-test, Analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster, factor and regression analyses were used.

Findings

Respondents expected to pay less for robot-delivered services than human-delivered services. Two clusters were identified: one cluster willing to pay nearly the same price for robotic services as for human-delivered services, whilst the other expected deep discounts for robotic services. The willingness-to-pay was positively associated with the attitudes towards robots in tourism, robotic service experience expectations, men and household size. It was negatively associated to travel frequency, age and education.

Research limitations/implications

The paper’s main limitation is its exploratory nature and the use of a hypothetical scenario in measuring respondents’ willingness to pay. The data were gathered prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and do not reflect the potential changes in perceptions of robots due to the pandemic.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to focus on improving the attitudes towards robots in tourism because they are strongly and positively related to the willingness to pay. The marketing messages need to form positive expectations about robotic services.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to investigate consumers’ willingness to pay for robot-delivered services in travel, tourism and hospitality and factors that shape their willingness to pay.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Elizaveta Lohninger, Willy Legrand and Rose Delgado-Krebs

Experiential tourism has surged before the COVID-19 pandemic, and all signs are pointing out to a rapid increase postpandemic. However, it is no longer a question of…

Abstract

Experiential tourism has surged before the COVID-19 pandemic, and all signs are pointing out to a rapid increase postpandemic. However, it is no longer a question of whether to provide an experience or not, but rather which experience to provide. Travellers are demanding, and the forced pause in travel is fueling the concept of revenge travel but with consumers seeking unique experiences with nature as the center stage. The concept of glass igloo hotel (GIH) taps into the unique experience within a natural setting, offering guests the opportunity to reconnect with panoramic views of the natural surroundings. This research investigates consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for such experience at a GIH. Results collected from 127 participants present hypothetical WTP which appears to be lower than actual rates published at some existing GIHs. Specific attributes sought after by guests in regards to the GIH experience were also investigated. The closeness to nature, view from the igloo, and proximity of the bathroom are particularly important. And while the igloo hotel experience offers the possibility to disconnect form the modern world, the availability of Wi-Fi was deemed important nevertheless. The research was conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic which may yet further influence the WTP for such an experience.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Athanasios Krystallis and George Chryssohoidis

Seeks to provide answers to two questions: is willingness to pay (WTP) for organic products influenced by the same set of factors that affect purchasing of conventional…

27471

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to provide answers to two questions: is willingness to pay (WTP) for organic products influenced by the same set of factors that affect purchasing of conventional foods? Does WTP for organic products vary according to different food categories?

Design/methodology/approach

Purchasers were approached during their food shopping in retail chains in Athens in July 2003. Sample inclusion is based on real awareness of the term “organic”. The questionnaire included in its first part a number of criteria that influence consumers when buying food. In the second part respondents were asked to indicate if any food products they buy were organic and to state how much more they were willing to pay. Information from the first part was analysed with factor analysis. With the help of t‐value analysis, it was examined whether there is a statistically significant difference per product category between consumers who are willing to pay and consumers who are unwilling to pay in terms of the factors identified.

Findings

Consumers' stated WTP and the type and magnitude of factors that affect it differ according to the organic food category. These factors include food quality and security, trust in the certification, and, for some products, brand name. Organoleptic characteristics, prices and consumers' socio‐demographic profiles do not constitute determinants of organic WTP.

Research limitations/implications

Organic types of some fresh as well as processed food products do not exist in the Greek market. Moreover, the large number of t‐tests conducted might result in Type I error.

Originality/value

Purchasing of organic food follows “basic‐highest frequency”, “basic‐average frequency”, and “non‐basic” discrimination. The most frequently consumed organic products are some basic components of the Greek diet. Only the factors “quality and security” and “trust” play an important role in defining WTP for most organic food categories. Consumers' attitudes towards both organic and PDO/PGI certifications converge towards a perception of high quality food. Approximately 26 percent of the sample exhibited a U‐shaped WTP trend for 14 out of 16 organic food categories in increments from 45 to 120 percent. All the above elements of originality are particularly valuable for organic food firms and policy/decision makers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Joan L. Ellis, Vicki A. McCracken and Nathan Skuza

The purpose of this paper is to determine consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for organic versus conventionally produced cotton apparel, and to explore the role of…

5835

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for organic versus conventionally produced cotton apparel, and to explore the role of purchase behaviors, apparel attributes and consumer beliefs about organics in purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2nd priced auction was used to estimate WTP, along with a follow‐up survey to collect information on participants’ demographics, attitudes and behavior.

Findings

On average, participants were willing to pay a 25 percent premium for an organic cotton t‐shirt over the visibly similar t‐shirt made from conventionally produced cotton. Participants who pay for their own clothing or make purchase decisions alone were not willing to pay a premium. Previous history of purchasing organic foods, perceived product quality, fit and the participant's race were also significant predictors of WTP.

Research limitations/implications

A more representative sample and the inclusion of other product categories are necessary to generalize the relationships found in this study.

Practical implications

This research helps to profile the organic cotton consumer. Findings suggest that retailers need to consider the income of target consumers when making decisions about carrying organic apparel products. Further, consumers with a history of purchasing organic products appear to carry that purchase behavior across product categories. When marketing organic apparel products, the perception of a higher quality product may yield a higher WTP.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to use an experimental auction in estimating WTP for apparel. Relevant consumer beliefs about organics, purchase behaviors and apparel product attributes are also explored.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Joseph A. Adjabui, Peter R. Tozer and David I. Gray

The purpose of this paper is to assess farmers’ willingness to participate and pay for weather-based index insurance in the Upper East Region of Ghana, and what factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess farmers’ willingness to participate and pay for weather-based index insurance in the Upper East Region of Ghana, and what factors influence the participation and purchase of crop insurance schemes.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 200 farmers in the region was carried out in 2018 to measure demographic information, farm characteristics, risks and risk-management practices and attitudes to crop insurance programs. The survey also captured maximum willingness to pay (WTP) for crop insurance. The double-bounded contingent valuation technique was used to estimate the WTP for crop insurance and the variables that affected WTP.

Findings

Farmers, in general, had an indifferent attitude to crop insurance in the region, but were willing to participate in the crop insurance programme, and were willing to pay between 7.5 and 12.5 per cent of the cost of growing maize as a premium for crop insurance. Demographic and economic variables did not impact WTP, but attitude towards crop insurance, farm diversification and frequency of drought negatively impacted on the WTP for crop insurance.

Practical implications

Education programs could be undertaken to improve the attitude and understanding towards crop insurance, as some farmers perceived the programme as not trustworthy, and others did not truly understand the operation of the programme.

Social implications

Drought can have a significant impact on household welfare, particularly in food insecure countries or regions. Crop insurance can provide a method of securing income for farmers allowing them to purchase food rather than other choices, such as removing children from education to reduce household expenses, improving the long-term welfare of the farm household.

Originality/value

This paper considers willingness to participate and WTP for a crop insurance programme in Ghana, it is one of a small number of papers that consider attitude to, and willingness to participate and WTP for crop insurance in developing countries. The value of the research is the expanded understanding of farmer attitude to crop insurance and their lack of knowledge of crop insurance operations.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 79 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Anna Cartwright, Edward Cartwright, Lian Xue and Julio Hernandez-Castro

Ransomware is a relatively new form of financial extortion that is proving a major cyber-security threat to individuals and organisations. This study aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Ransomware is a relatively new form of financial extortion that is proving a major cyber-security threat to individuals and organisations. This study aims to investigate factors that may influence an individual's willingness to engage in a ransom payment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study ran a large survey (n = 1,798) on a representative sample of the UK population. This study elicited willingness to pay (WTP) ransomware and also reasons for not wanting to pay a ransom to criminals. This study then used non-parametric tests and regression analysis to identify factors that influence WTP.

Findings

This study finds that women and younger age groups are significantly more willing to pay a ransom, as are those who store photos. There is a strong positive relationship between concern for data breach and WTP a ransom.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first large scale study to look at WTP ransomware. This study identifies a range of factors that can help inform law enforcement to target advice about ransomware attacks.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Yaowarat Sriwaranun, Christopher Gan, Minsoo Lee and David A Cohen

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) a premium for organics.

3518

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors affecting consumers’ willingness to pay (WTP) a premium for organics.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at five retail stores in metropolitan Bangkok. Exploratory factor analysis and the double-bound contingent valuation method were used for analysis.

Findings

Results indicate WTP premiums of 88, 51 and 51 per cent for kale, jasmine rice and pork, respectively. Analysis indicates that respondents are willing to pay a premium if they have already purchased organic products, have good health, strong ethical and environmental concerns, think that organic products provide greater quality and health benefits, and reside in the city. Respondents with children, however, are less likely to pay a premium for organic products. Analysis also indicates that the price premium hinders purchase.

Practical implications

Efforts should be made by policymakers, together with marketers and producers, to lower the price of organic products to attract more consumers.

Originality/value

To enlarge the organic market, one must understand consumers’ preferences for organic products and the premium they will pay for them. This is not well-researched. Though several studies have investigated consumers’ behaviour towards environmentally friendly products in Thailand, there is little research on WTP. This lack is a major impediment to the growth of organic consumption and the development of organic product markets.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Faical Akaichi, José M. Gil and Rodolfo M. Nayga

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the market potential of a locally produced and high quality food product (i.e. white bean “Mongeta Ganxet” (MG)) from Catalonia…

1219

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the market potential of a locally produced and high quality food product (i.e. white bean “Mongeta Ganxet” (MG)) from Catalonia, Spain. Consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for the product is elicited using a non‐hypothetical economic experiment and then the sensitivity of WTP values is analyzed with regard to additional information provided to participants that includes reference prices, leaflets and tasting. Finally, a sample‐selection model is estimated to assess the factors that significantly affect consumers' WTP for the product.

Design/methodology/approach

To elicit the willingness to pay a premium for the local food product, 90 subjects were invited to participate in a random nth price experimental auction. Before auctioning the product, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about consumer attitudes and purchase habits.

Findings

Only 7 percent of participants are willing to pay a price higher than the minimum price from which the MG product may be purchased directly from a producer or the local producing market. Also, it was found that providing reference prices of substitute products (both conventional and alternative high quality white beans) positively affects WTP for the MG. Interestingly, however, provision of information on organoleptic, nutritional and cooking characteristics of the MG and product tasting do not significantly influence WTP. Finally, the level of consumption, the degree of knowledge about the product and the participants' previous experience increase the purchasing intention for the MG.

Originality/value

In contrast to traditional market research studies that use hypothetical methods, the authors use non‐hypothetical elicitation mechanism to elicit consumers' valuation for an important local food product in Catalonia, Spain. Since actual products and cash were used in the experiments, the authors provided the respondents with an incentive to reveal their true preferences and valuation for the product of interest. The authors also tested the effect of provision of certain types of information on WTP and analyzed the factors that significantly influence consumers' WTP for the product.

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Xiaolin Liu, Lingling Xu, Dian Zhu and Linhai Wu

– The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer attitudes toward and willingness to pay (WTP) for traceability of tea in China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine consumer attitudes toward and willingness to pay (WTP) for traceability of tea in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the payment card method to elicit WTP for certified traceable tea and logistic regression model to analyze the factors that affected consumers’ WTP.

Findings

The results revealed that most consumers in China were concerned over tea safety; however, their WTP for certified traceable tea was limited. Only income and the degree of concern over tea safety affected the consumer’s WTP for certified traceable tea greatly. When it came to consumers’ WTP a positive price premium, income level, education, and attitude toward traceability of tea significantly influenced the actual premium consumers were willing to pay.

Practical implications

The Chinese government and tea producers should pay attention when implementing tea traceability system. First, raising the consumers’ income contributes to the premiums that consumers are willing to pay for certified traceable tea. Second, social groups, consumer organizations and tea producers should popularize knowledge of tea traceability. Third, given the low price premiums that consumers are willing to pay, the establishment of viable traceability of tea in China requires the producers and the government to bear some of the cost associated with the implementation of this system.

Originality/value

In past studies on WTP for certified traceable food, the study is focussed on meat in developed countries, and the research has expanded range of study, by conducting a survey in China to determine consumers’ WTP for certified traceable tea, and by empirically examining the main factors that influence the willingness of consumers to pay a price premium for certified traceable tea, as well as the premium that these consumers are willing to pay.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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