Search results

1 – 10 of 15
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Salvador P. Barragan

This paper aims to examine the implications of applying Herbert Simon’s bounded rationality to records and information management (RIM) and the possibility that a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the implications of applying Herbert Simon’s bounded rationality to records and information management (RIM) and the possibility that a risk/reward heuristic may be part of the disposition decision-making cognitive process. This in turn may improve the understanding of disposition and its suboptimal results and offer alternatives in understanding why certain behaviors exist around keeping information beyond its retention; and to possibly alter this behavior. This in turn may improve the application of information life-cycle policies through the development of new decision-making heuristics for information retention.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines disposition of information and how the addition of bounded rationality may improve the understanding of why disposition has not been as successful as it might be.

Findings

This paper concludes that bounded rationality could elevate the RIM function and alter how RIM practitioners within the private sector understand how appraisal and therefore disposition of information occurs. Further, the inclusion of bounded rationality into disposition decision-making may create new roles for practitioners and extend the influence and reach of RIM. Future developments must be watched and analyzed to see if this approach becomes the norm.

Practical implications

This paper will be of interest to stakeholders responsible for valuing information, appraisal/disposition of information, life-cycle management, records management, information management and big data analytics. The work is original, but parts of this subject were previously addressed in another study.

Originality/value

Parts of this work were part of a PhD study by this author.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Salvador Barragan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possible implications of applying the infonomics methodology and measurement model within records and information management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possible implications of applying the infonomics methodology and measurement model within records and information management (RIM) to reduce organizations’ electronic footprint. By analyzing content using infonomics, it is possible for RIM managers in the private sector to keep only information with the highest value and change their behavior around keeping content beyond its infonomic value. This, in turn, may reduce the stress upon natural resources that are used in maintaining information data centers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines different theories of evaluating information value and describes the role of infonomics in analyzing information as an asset to minimize its electronic footprint. Its focus is on the implications of applying a set of measurements that go beyond the information valuing models currently used in RIM; thereby, this study addresses how information that has superseded its business value may be eliminated.

Findings

This paper concludes that infonomics could elevate RIM function and alter how RIM managers within the private sector value information. Further, the inclusion of infonomics into RIM models may create new roles for RIM managers and extend the influence and reach of RIM. This may also lead to valuing all content and eliminating content that no longer has any business value. This may also eliminate the need for large data storage centers that harness and exhaust nonrenewable resources. Future developments must be watched and analyzed to see if this becomes a norm.

Practical implications

This paper will be of interest to stakeholders responsible for valuing information, appraisal of information, life-cycle management, records management, InfoSec and big data analytics.

Originality/value

The work is original but parts of this subject have been previously addressed in another study.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Murat Erogul, Salvador Barragan and Caroline Essers

Understanding belonging provides a better insight into the structural, political, cultural and gendered elements of entrepreneurship. This paper aims to focus on Mexican…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding belonging provides a better insight into the structural, political, cultural and gendered elements of entrepreneurship. This paper aims to focus on Mexican female entrepreneurs’ (MFE) experiences in managing material and affective aspects of entrepreneurial belonging during the start-up and transition phase to become an established business owner.

Design/methodology/approach

The narrative analysis is based on qualitative interview data with 11 MFE in Mexico.

Findings

The analysis reveals that MFEs’ sense of belonging evolves from self-oriented to more socially-oriented identity claims. In the former, the need to “fit in” and achieve material aspects of belonging is intertwined with gender and family responsibilities. In the latter, the need to “stand out” and achieve affective aspects of belonging is intertwined with validating entrepreneurial achievements by challenging gendered assumptions and helping others through the notion of “sisterhood.”

Originality/value

The paper extends the understanding of the relation of material and affective aspects of belonging as an “evolving” process from the nascent stage to the established stage of entrepreneurship. Within the evolving process of entrepreneurial belonging, a shift from material to affective aspects unveils a theoretical framework that relates belonging, gender and entrepreneurship in context. This process seems to regulate entrepreneur’s agency in what they interpret as acceptable while standing up against challenges and legitimizing belonging through the emergence of a “sisterhood.”

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Mariana I. Paludi, Salvador Barragan and Albert Mills

The purpose of this study is to add to the existing research on critical perspectives on diversity management (DM). Specifically, this study examines the narratives of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to add to the existing research on critical perspectives on diversity management (DM). Specifically, this study examines the narratives of women chief executive officers (CEOs) from different countries of origin to understand how they enact the DM discourse by drawing on their past and present experiences at US multinational corporations (MNCs) located in Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

This study, based on six open-ended interviews with local and expatriate women CEOs who work in MNCs situated in Mexico, used a sensemaking approach to analyze their narratives. The theoretical foundation of the study is based on decolonial feminist theory, which is used to analyze the hierarchical binary between Anglo-Saxon/European woman and the Mexican/Latin American woman with respect to the discourse of DM.

Findings

This study found that the dominant discourse used by women CEOs, expats and nationals was a business case for diversity. Female CEOs represent MNCs in favorable terms, compared to those of local companies, despite the nuances in the antagonistic representations in their narratives. This study also found that the women CEOs’ narratives perpetuated a discourse of “otherness” that created a hierarchy between Anglo-Saxons (US/MNCs’ culture) and Latin Americans (Mexican/local companies’ culture).

Originality/value

This study contributes to critical studies on DM by analyzing diverse forms of power involving gender, race/ethnicity and organizational hierarchy. The use of decolonial feminist theory to examine MNCs is a novel approach to understanding women’s identities and the power differences between local/foreign contexts and global/local businesses. This study also discusses the implications of its findings for women in business careers and concludes with a call for more research within the global South (Latin America).

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Salvador Barragan, Charles Cappellino, Neil Dempsey and Sandra Rothenberg

Reflects on the experience of three product development teams to build a framework to aid in the process of strategic sourcing. Focuses on patterns observed across these…

2440

Abstract

Reflects on the experience of three product development teams to build a framework to aid in the process of strategic sourcing. Focuses on patterns observed across these three new product development projects in terms of challenges in strategic sourcing. Building from these observations, proposes a four‐step decision‐making framework that enables product development teams and managers to make informed product development sourcing decisions. The framework was designed to have enough structure to guide the sourcing decision process, but flexible enough to promote challenging thinking and deep analysis.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Isabella M. Krysa, Albert Mills and Salvador Barragan

The purpose of this paper is to critically look at how immigrants to Canada are informed and educated about how to become productive members of society. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically look at how immigrants to Canada are informed and educated about how to become productive members of society. The authors adopted a postcolonial framework to unveil the underlying assumptions embedded in the messages that are conveyed to “teach” and “prepare” immigrants for the Canadian workplace. In particular, the authors focus on non-white immigrants because they form the majority of immigrants to Canada and at the same time data show that they experience particular socio-economic obstacles in their settlement process that European immigrants did not.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply postcolonialism as the theoretical framework. This approach allows the authors to analyze the relationship between the local subject and the encounter with the non-local other, in this case the immigrant who is from a non-European background. The authors conduct a Foucauldian critical discourse analysis on selected texts that serve as information sources for immigrants. These texts include government documents, immigrant information brochures, and workplace information books and booklets.

Findings

The analysis shows ideological positions that reveal discursive messages representing the non-white immigrant in binary terms. Such immigrants are represented in opposing (and inferior) terms to the local (largely white) Canadian citizen. By adopting a postcolonial lens, the analysis shows that the messages to acculturate immigrants reveal assimilationist features.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge that the authors’ own personal socio-political, intellectual, and ideological locations influence the approach, logic, research process, and the interpretation of the findings. For future research, other textual sources should be analyzed with regard to the messages they convey to immigrants as a form of education to see what kind of acculturation is conveyed.

Practical implications

This paper sheds light on the necessity to develop policies that not only aim to acculturate immigrants using integration strategies but also to carefully communicate and educate newcomers through messages that that do not stem from colonial assumptions.

Originality/value

This research points out the taken-for granted and oftentimes invisible forms of discriminatory practices in the workplace that appear non-discriminatory on the surface but are rooted in colonial thinking. Consequently, the authors challenge “mainstream” management theories concerning diversity in the workplace by questioning the underlying messages portrayed to immigrants.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Salvador Barragan, Mariana I. Paludi and Albert Mills

The purpose of this paper is to focus on top women managers who act as change agents in the machista culture of Mexico. Specifically, the authors centre the attention not…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on top women managers who act as change agents in the machista culture of Mexico. Specifically, the authors centre the attention not only on the strategies performed by these change agents to reduce inequality, but also on understanding the way in which they discursively reproduce or challenge essentialist notions of gender with respect to the cultural and organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 top women managers in Mexico who are actively involved as change agents. A feminist poststructuralist methodological framework using critical discourse analysis was used to uncover competing notions of gender and related strategies developed to promote gender equality.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the 12 change agents perform strategies for inclusion, and only half of them engage in strategies for re-evaluation. The authors were unable to recognize whether these change agents are engaged in strategies of transformation. These change agents also reproduce and challenge “essentialist” notions of gender. In some instances – based on their own career experiences and gendered identities – they (un)consciously have adopted essentialism to fit into the cultural context of machista society. They also challenge the gender binary to eradicate essentialist notions of gender that created gender inequalities in the first place.

Research limitations/implications

The experience of these 12 top women managers may not represent the voice of other women and their careers. Ultimately, intersections with class, organizational level, nationality, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation must be taken into account so to represent other women’s particular interests with respect to equality.

Practical implications

For those researchers-consultants who may be involved in an intervention strategy, it is important to focus on helping the change agents in reviewing and reflecting on their own “vision of gender equity”. During the strategic activities of mentoring and training, these change agents could potentially “leak” a particular “vision of gender” to other women and men. Thus, part of the intervention strategy should target the change agent’s self-reflection to influence her capacity to act as change agents.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the literature on change agents and interventions for gender equality. Intervention strategies usually centre on essentialist notions of gender. The study offers potential explanations for this approach by paying attention to the process of how change agents, in their efforts to promote gender equality, may be unconsciously projecting their own identities onto others and/or consciously engaging in strategic essentialism to fit into the machista context of Mexico.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

975

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Scope exists for women executives to challenge the prevailing gender inequality within the machista culture in Mexico. Approaches based on sameness and difference can inspire greater equality in the short term but in reality help preserve essentialist notions of gender. A more profound strategy is advocated as means to address the gender binary that provides the foundation for inequality.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Sarah R. Demb, MLIS and Eira Tansey, MLIS

314

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Salvador Baena-Morales, Mayra Urrea-Solano, Diego Gavilán-Martin and Alberto Ferriz-Valero

Education for Sustainable Development (EDS) has highlighted the need to generate instruments to assess the sustainability competencies of different populations. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

Education for Sustainable Development (EDS) has highlighted the need to generate instruments to assess the sustainability competencies of different populations. In this regard, Physical Education (PE) has been recognized as a subject with unique characteristics that allow students to develop competencies that favor sustainability. However, in previous literature, there are no specific instruments to assess the competencies of future Physical Education teachers (PETs). Therefore, this research aims to design and validate an instrument to assess sustainable competencies in future PETs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper shows the validation process of a questionnaire designed ad hoc to measure the future teacher's sustainable competencies. In total, 341 students completed the Physical Education Scale for Sustainable Development in Future Teachers (PESD-FT) questionnaire consisting of 20 items and an eight-point Likert scale. To ensure the relationship of the instrument's items with the sustainable development, the specific targets that compose the 17 Sustainable Development Goals were considered.

Findings

The results showed that the instrument had very high reliability (0.949), excellently fulfilling the validity criteria (0.929). Furthermore, the principal component factor analysis results showed that the PESD-FT comprises three factors, which coincide with the three dimensions of sustainability.

Originality/value

It is concluded that PESD-FT is an instrument that reliably assesses the sustainable competencies of prospective PET and expands the possibilities of PE as a valuable instrument to promote sustainable competencies in an integrated way with PE learning objectives. As such, it can be a robust and valuable measurement tool for proposing effective education for sustainable development policies and programs in initial teacher education for PET.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15