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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Rodrigo Basco

The purpose of this paper is to compare the post-entry firm behavior of firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for family-oriented vs opportunity-oriented reasons.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the post-entry firm behavior of firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for family-oriented vs opportunity-oriented reasons.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the institutional logics perspective, the author argues that firms under the influence of opportunity-oriented or family-oriented owner-managers may differ in their internal practices, purpose, strategies, and performance. The author follows an inductive research methodology strategy by performing multivariate analyses with a sample of 1,733 Chilean firms to explore the preliminary conjectures.

Findings

Firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for a family-oriented reason finance their investment with firm resources, are less dependent on one customer and are willing to put forth less innovation effort than firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for an opportunity-oriented reason. No differences were found in terms of employee productivity. Additionally, the results show that young firms owner-managed by opportunity-oriented entrepreneurs have higher growth ratios than young firms owner-managed by family-oriented entrepreneurs. Inversely, old firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for an opportunity-oriented reason grow much less than old firms owner-managed by entrepreneurs who entered for a family-oriented reason.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature at the intersection of family business and entrepreneurship by addressing the calls made by Aldrich and Cliff (2003) and Discua Cruz and Basco (2018) to better understand the family’s influence on entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2024

Rodrigo Basco

This perspective article aims to summarise the understanding of the link between regional development and family business and explore potential pathways for further investigations.

Abstract

Purpose

This perspective article aims to summarise the understanding of the link between regional development and family business and explore potential pathways for further investigations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a scoping review methodology which attempts to explore a new topic of study and unveil its main concepts and relationships.

Findings

This study emphasises the need to enhance the cross-fertilisation of knowledge to bridge the gap between studies on regional development and family business. In addition to the traditional research pathways towards discerning the impact of formal and informal institutional contexts and economic and geographical locations on family business behaviour and performance, this perspective article encourages future researchers to delve into the regional-level mechanisms through which family businesses can influence and contribute to regional economic and social outcomes.

Originality/value

This perspective study employs a context theorising lens to examine the connection between regional development and family business.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Rodrigo Basco and Andrea Calabrò

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what types of open innovation search strategies are associated with internal innovation activities in family and non-family SMEs within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what types of open innovation search strategies are associated with internal innovation activities in family and non-family SMEs within natural resource-based clusters.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an empirical analysis of a sample of 245 Chilean firms.

Findings

Results suggest that while family and non-family SMEs do not significantly differ in terms of internal innovation activities, important differences exist in terms of open innovation search strategies. In particular, family SMEs search for new ideas and knowledge within their closest network of relationships (e.g. customers, suppliers and competitors), whereas non-family SMEs mainly focus on broader network relationships (e.g. universities, public institutions and fair trade organizations).

Practical implications

This study shows that within a natural resource cluster, the types of firm do matter. In fact, family and non-family SMEs use different open innovation search strategies to innovate; hence, this research may help and assist policy makers in tailoring innovation policies aimed at expanding the potential benefits of clusters for regional growth and development.

Originality/value

This research addresses the call to further investigate the link between family SMEs and innovation in developing countries, given that SMEs may also act as a lively player for regional development.

Propósito

El objetivo de este artículo es investigar las estrategias de búsqueda de innovación abierta de las pequeñas y medianas empresas familiares y no familiares en un clúster basado en los recursos naturales.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Este estudio está basado en un análisis empírico con una muestra de 245 empresas Chilenas.

Recomendaciones

Los resultados muestran que no hay diferencias significativas en las actividades internas de innovación entre las pequeñas y medianas empresas familiares y no-familiares de la muestra. Sin embargo, se han encontrado diferencias en las estrategias de búsqueda de innovación abierta que utilizan de las empresas. Las empresas familiares buscan nuevas ideas y conocimiento para innovar entre sus contactos más cercanos (por ejemplo: clientes, proveedores y competidores). Las empresas no-familiares se enfocan en contactos más amplios (por ejemplo: tales como universidades, instituciones públicas y ferias internacionales).

Implicaciones prácticas

Este estudio muestra que distinguir entre empresas familiares y no familiares dentro de los clúster basados en los recursos naturales es importante. Las pequeñas y medianas empresas familiares y no familiares usan diferentes estrategias de búsqueda de innovación abierta. Por lo tanto, nuestros resultados pueden ayudar al diseño de políticas públicas de innovación diferenciando empresas familiares y no familiares con el objetivo de potenciar los beneficios de los clúster para el crecimiento y desarrollo regional.

Originalidad/valor

Este artículo intenta avanzar en la investigación relacionando innovación y pequeñas y medianas empresas familiares en países en desarrollo.

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2017

Andrea Calabrò, Giovanna Campopiano and Rodrigo Basco

Drawing on the principal-principal conflict and identity literatures, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the Agency Problem Type II-bis in the context of family business…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the principal-principal conflict and identity literatures, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the Agency Problem Type II-bis in the context of family business. Specifically, the authors hypothesize that the size of the family owner group is related to firm growth and that this relationship is moderated by the extent to which the family identifies with the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested on a sample of 265 medium and large German family firms (FFs) via moderated hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The main findings suggest that business family identity moderates the inverted U-shaped relationship between the size of the family owner group and firm growth in such a way that FFs with medium-sized family owner groups and high levels of business family identity reach higher firm growth.

Practical implications

In the context of FFs fully owned by one family, family owners might have different strategic preferences, goals, and identities, thus potentially making them subject to the conflict that could arise among the different family owners in relation to growth expectations. Recognizing this problem could help family owners find potential solutions to ensure the well-being of both the family and the business.

Originality/value

The combination of family ownership structure and family ownership dynamics affects firm growth. Challenging the homogeneity of the family owner group, the authors highlight the role of Agency Problem Type II-bis in hindering growth of FFs. A finer-grained view of principal-principal conflicts in FFs is thus discussed.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Albert James, Elias Hadjielias, Maribel Guerrero, Allan Discua Cruz and Rodrigo Basco

This article is the editorial for the special issue on “Entrepreneurial Families in Business Across Generations, Contexts and Cultures”. We aim to develop a road map that can help…

Abstract

Purpose

This article is the editorial for the special issue on “Entrepreneurial Families in Business Across Generations, Contexts and Cultures”. We aim to develop a road map that can help academics and practitioners navigate the findings of the articles contained in this special issue. We also suggest future lines of research around the topic of entrepreneurial families in business.

Design/methodology/approach

We develop a conceptual model for interpreting and understanding entrepreneurial families in business across contexts and time.

Findings

Our conceptual model highlights the importance of context and time when conducting research on entrepreneurial families in business.

Practical implications

The findings in this special issue will be of relevance for decision makers who tailor policies that embrace different economic and social actors, including entrepreneurial families.

Originality/value

This editorial and the articles that make up this special issue contribute to family business research by contextualising the phenomenon of entrepreneurial families in business. We propose a new holistic perspective to incorporate context and time in the study of entrepreneurial families that own, govern and manage family firms over time.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Ismael Barros-Contreras, Rodrigo Basco, Natalia Martín-Cruz and Juan Hernangómez

The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the roots of family firms' competitive advantages by defining and testing the familiness learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the roots of family firms' competitive advantages by defining and testing the familiness learning mechanisms that emerge from the interaction between family and firm. Because family members are economically, emotionally and socially attached to the firm, family firms are expected to be able to develop unique and difficult to imitate learning mechanisms related to family firm value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study operationalizes and tests the concept of the familiness learning mechanism using a sample of nonlisted Spanish family firms. The sample is analyzed using the structural equation modeling method.

Findings

Results show that family firms' ability to accumulate internal and external knowledge, integrate social knowledge, as well as create and retain socioemotional knowledge forms the concept of the familiness learning mechanism, and the authors show what implications it might have for family firm value creation.

Originality/value

By using the dynamic capabilities approach, this article highlights the importance of the knowledge and learning derived from family involvement in the firm. The creation of learning mechanisms occurs because of the close relationships between family members and their simultaneous participation in the family and in the company systems, which creates a unique context wherein knowledge and learning emerge in an idiosyncratic manner.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Irma Martinez-Garcia, Rodrigo Basco, Silvia Gomez-Anson and Narjess Boubakri

This article attempts to answer the following questions: Who ultimately owns firms listed in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries? Does ownership structure depend on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to answer the following questions: Who ultimately owns firms listed in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries? Does ownership structure depend on the institutional context? How does ownership affect firm performance? Do institutional factors influence the ownership–performance relationship?

Design/methodology/approach

We apply univariate analyses and generalised methods of moments estimations for a sample of 692 GCC listed firms during 2009–2015.

Findings

Our results reveal that corporations are mainly controlled by the state or families, the ownership structure is highly concentrated and pyramid structures are common in the region. Ownership is more concentrated in non-financial than financial firms, and ownership concentration and shareholder identity differ by institutional country setting. Finally, ownership concentration does not influence performance, but formal institutions play a moderating role in the relationship.

Practical implications

As our findings reveal potential type II agency problems due to ownership concentration, policymakers should raise awareness of professional corporate governance practices and tailor them to GCC countries’ institutional contexts.

Social implications

Even with the introduction of new regulations by some GCC states to protect minority investors and promote corporate governance practices, ownership concentration is a rigid structure, and its use by investors to protect their economic endowment and power is culturally embedded.

Originality/value

Although previous studies have analysed ownership concentration and large shareholders’ identities across countries, this study fills a research gap investigating this phenomenon in-depth in emerging economies.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual, multi-voiced paper aims to collectively explore and theorize family entrepreneuring, which is a research stream dedicated to investigating the emergence and becoming of entrepreneurial phenomena in business families and family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the novelty of this research stream, the authors asked 20 scholars in entrepreneurship and family business to reflect on topics, methods and issues that should be addressed to move this field forward.

Findings

Authors highlight key challenges and point to new research directions for understanding family entrepreneuring in relation to issues such as agency, processualism and context.

Originality/value

This study offers a compilation of multiple perspectives and leverage recent developments in the fields of entrepreneurship and family business to advance research on family entrepreneuring.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Stefano Amato, Rodrigo Basco, Silvia Gómez Ansón and Nicola Lattanzi

This study investigates the relationship between family-managed firms and firm employment growth by considering the effects of location and economic crisis as moderating variables.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between family-managed firms and firm employment growth by considering the effects of location and economic crisis as moderating variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses random-effect models on a large panel dataset of Spanish manufacturing firms covering 2003 to 2015 to estimate the joint effects of municipality size and economic crisis on firm employment growth.

Findings

The analysis reveals a positive association between family-managed firms and employment growth. However, this association is not uniform across space and time. When it considers location, the study finds that municipality size positively affects employment growth in family-managed firms but not in non-family firms. Additionally, while the study reveals that both firm types experience negative employment growth during the early stage of the global economic crisis (2007–08), it also finds that family-managed firms located in small municipalities downsize less than their non-family counterparts.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence on the resilience of family-managed firms during economic crises, particularly those located in geographically bounded settings, such as small municipalities. When an adverse event, such as an economic crisis, jeopardizes employment levels, the embedded and trust-based relationships, between a family firm and its community leads them to prioritize employees' claims. However, family-managed firms' commitment to preserve jobs in small municipalities cannot be maintained over the long term; this effect disappears if the economic crisis is protracted. This study sheds new light on family-managed firms' distinctive behavior toward with local communities.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

1 – 10 of 22