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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Rocco Palumbo

Digitization is reshaping the functioning of educational institutions. Large attention has been paid to the innovative service models enabled by digitization. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Digitization is reshaping the functioning of educational institutions. Large attention has been paid to the innovative service models enabled by digitization. However, the implications of digitization on employees’ well-being need further investigation. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of digitization on psycho-social risks at work in a large sample of European educational institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were collected from the third wave of the European Survey of Enterprises on New and Emerging Risks (ESENER). A serial mediation model was designed to obtain evidence on the implications of digitization on the psycho-social risks at work in 3,540 educational institutions. Alongside the direct implications of digitization on psycho-social risks, its indirect effects mediated by occupational health interventions and healthy workplace initiatives were investigated.

Findings

Digitization exacerbated psycho-social stressors at work. Increasing time pressures and intensifying work, digitization imperiled the employees’ well-being. Occupational health partially mediated the implications of digitization on psycho-social risks. Although healthy workplace interventions seemed to prevent the side effects of digitization on psycho-social risk, its mediating role was not statistically significant.

Practical implications

Digitization should be accompanied by interventions aimed at ensuring occupational health and at promoting a healthy workplace to minimize its drawbacks on psycho-social risks. Occupational health creates a greater awareness of the negative effects of digitization on work-related stressors. Healthy workplace initiatives contribute to enhancing the employees’ psycho-physical well-being.

Originality/value

This study reports the negative implications of digitization on psycho-social risks at work in educational institutions, envisioning some avenues for further development.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Rocco Palumbo and Rosalba Manna

Organizational change (OC) triggers uncertainty and ambiguity, which have side effects for individual and groups. Even though scholars and practitioners have generally…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational change (OC) triggers uncertainty and ambiguity, which have side effects for individual and groups. Even though scholars and practitioners have generally conceived OC as a remedy for workplace discrimination (WD), it may determine opportunistic behaviors, which increase the risks of discrimination at work. The article discusses the direct and indirect effects of OC on WD, investigating the moderating role of organizational meaningfulness (OM) and employees' involvement (EI).

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were collected from the Eurofound's European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS). The sample included 33,024 European employees. A double moderation analysis based on the bootstrapping method was designed to collect evidence on the direct effects of OC on WD and on the indirect effects moderated by OM and EI.

Findings

OC was found to generate greater discrimination at work. People who were not informed about change and those who were not allowed to express their opinion about change were more likely to report discrimination. OM and EI performed as significant moderators of the side effects of OC on WD.

Practical implications

Restructurings and reorganizations are tricky processes. The uncertainty and ambiguity produced by OC might negatively affect interpersonal relationships at work and organizational practices, paving the way for overt and/or explicit discrimination. The construction of clear and shared senses around change is crucial to curb the drawbacks of organizational transitions on workplace discrimination. EI is essential to improve organizational sensemaking of change processes and to establish a positive organizational climate, which prevent the occurrence of WD.

Originality/value

Literature has overlooked the negative implications of OC on WD. The study findings emphasize that organizational transitions may trigger discrimination, creating greater uncertainty and ambiguity in the workplace. OM and EI allow overcoming ambiguity and increase the employees' ability to deal with uncertainty, addressing the side effects of OC on WD.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Rocco Palumbo, Mohammad Fakhar Manesh, Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini and Giulia Flamini

The human dimension of open innovation is paramount for organisational excellence. However, there is scant evidence of the implications of human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The human dimension of open innovation is paramount for organisational excellence. However, there is scant evidence of the implications of human resource management practices on employees' orientation towards open innovation. The article shows how such practices facilitate the development of an open innovation climate among food companies.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was designed to obtain insights into the approach to open innovation of a large sample of food companies (n = 2,458). Secondary data were collected from the sixth European Working Condition Survey. A parallel mediation analysis allowed us to investigate the human resource management practices' implications on individual perceptions of an open innovation-oriented organisational climate through the mediating effect of employees' involvement and engagement.

Findings

Human resource management practices have an impact on employees' skills, motivation and interpersonal relationships, but they do not have direct implications on the employees' perception of an open innovation-oriented organizational climate. As they solicit employees' involvement and engagement, human resource management practices indirectly nurture a favourable perception of an open innovation-oriented organisational climate.

Practical implications

Tailored human resource management practices should be crafted to increase employees' capabilities and motivation and, therefore, to sustain open innovation in the food sector. Human resource management practices foster employees' involvement and engagement, which pave the way for a greater proclivity to open innovation at the individual and collective levels.

Originality/value

The article discusses the implications of human resource management practices on the perception of an organisational climate conducive to open innovation, envisioning aspects to focus on and avenues for future research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Rocco Palumbo, Giulia Flamini, Luca Gnan and Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini

This study aims to shed light on the ambiguous effects of smart working (SW) on work meaningfulness. On the one hand, SW enables people to benefit from greater work…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to shed light on the ambiguous effects of smart working (SW) on work meaningfulness. On the one hand, SW enables people to benefit from greater work flexibility, advancing individual control over organizational activities. On the other hand, it may impair interpersonal exchanges at work, disrupting job meaningfulness. Hence, the implications of SW on work meaningfulness are investigated through the mediating role of interpersonal exchanges at work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate both the direct and indirect effects of SW on employees’ perceived meaningfulness at work. Secondary data come from the sixth European Working Conditions Survey. The study encompasses a sample of 30,932 employees. A mediation model based on ordinary least square regressions and bootstrap sampling is designed to obtain evidence of SW’s implications on meaningfulness at work through the mediating role of interpersonal relationships (IR).

Findings

The research findings suggest that SW triggers a positive sense of the significance of work. However, it negatively affects IR with peers and supervisors, entailing professional and spatial isolation. Impaired IR twists the positive implications of SW on organizational meaningfulness (OM), curtailing the employees’ sense of significance at work.

Practical implications

SW is a double-edged sword. It contributes to the enrichment of OM, enhancing the individual self-determination to shape the spatial context of work. However, its side effects on interpersonal exchanges generate a drift toward organizational meaninglessness. Tailored management interventions intended to sustain IR at work are needed to fit the design of SW arrangements to the employees’ evolving social needs.

Originality/value

The paper pushes forward what is currently known about the implications of SW on OM, examining them through the mediating role of IR at work.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Mauro Cavallone and Rocco Palumbo

Soft total quality management (STQM) is a requisite for the successful implementation of hard total quality management interventions. However, there is limited empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Soft total quality management (STQM) is a requisite for the successful implementation of hard total quality management interventions. However, there is limited empirical evidence on the implications of adopting soft total quality management practices. Inter alia, little is known about the consequences of employee involvement in addressing organizational and management challenges. To fill this gap, the article investigates the effects of employees' involvement on their commitment to organizational excellence.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were collected from the European Company Survey (ECS). A large sample of 15,958 European companies was involved in the analysis. A parallel mediation model was devised to investigate the effects of employee involvement on commitment to organizational excellence. Training and motivation were contemplated as mediating variables to investigate the indirect implications of employee involvement on commitment to organizational excellence.

Findings

Employee involvement contributed marginally towards establishing an increased individual commitment to organizational excellence. Training and motivation played a relevant and statistically significant mediating role, boosting the implications of involvement on commitment to organizational excellence.

Practical implications

Employee involvement is critical for establishing an organizational climate conducive to organizational excellence. However, its implications should be contextualized in light of the mediating role of training and motivation. On the one hand, training is expected to increase employees' participation in the enhancement of organizational excellence. On the other hand, motivation fosters employee engagement in the improvement of organizational dynamics.

Originality/value

The article investigates the implications of employee involvement on commitment to organizational excellence in a large sample of European companies, emphasizing that soft TQM interventions should be implemented according to a systemic perspective in order to pave the way for a viable commitment to organizational excellence.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Rocco Palumbo, Maria Vincenza Ciasullo, Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini, Andrea Caputo and Mario Turco

Eco-museums safeguard the cultural authenticity and the historical identity of the place in which they operate. Conventional organizational models and management practices…

Abstract

Purpose

Eco-museums safeguard the cultural authenticity and the historical identity of the place in which they operate. Conventional organizational models and management practices are generally employed to achieve this institutional aim. Conversely, innovative solutions – such as digitization – are overlooked. Adopting a service quality management perspective, the article intends to examine the role of managerialization and professionalization in triggering eco-museums' digitization.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical analysis involving 126 eco-museums operating in Italy as of 2018 was designed to investigate the implications of managerialization and professionalization on the eco-museums' propensity to embark on a digitization process. Two different forms of digitization were examined: (1) the presence of eco-museums in the digital environment; and (2) the exploitation of digital tools for service delivery. The mediating role of two “soft” total quality management (TQM) practices, i.e. people centredness and strategic focus on visitors' experience, was contemplated in the empirical analysis.

Findings

The research findings suggest that managerialization and professionalization have ambiguous effects on eco-museums' digitization. Nevertheless, they indirectly contribute to a greater digital presence of eco-museums and to a larger use of digital tools for service delivery through an increased use of soft TQM practices.

Research limitations/implications

Managerialization and professionalization are likely to foster the digital transition of eco-museums, which advances their ability to protect and promote the local cultural heritage. Soft TQM practices intended to achieve people-centredness and to enhance the visitors' experience should be exploited to stimulate the eco-museums' digitization.

Originality/value

The article examines the triggers of eco-museums' digitization, providing some food for thought to scholars and practitioners.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Rocco Palumbo, Rosalba Manna and Mauro Cavallone

Telecommuting from home is back up on the agenda as a result of the unforeseen challenges brought by COVID-19. Working from home permits to avoid disruption in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Telecommuting from home is back up on the agenda as a result of the unforeseen challenges brought by COVID-19. Working from home permits to avoid disruption in the ordinary functioning of educational institutions triggered by social distancing. However, home-based telecommuting may have some side effects on employees, especially in terms of work-life balance. Soft Total Quality Management (TQM) initiatives are needed to address these side effects. The article intends to shed light on these issues, providing some food for thought to scholars and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data about the working conditions of 2,046 people employed in the education sector across Europe were investigated. A serial mediation analysis was designed to examine the direct and indirect implications of working from home on work-life balance.

Findings

The study suggests that home-based telecommuting may trigger work-to-life and life-to-work conflicts, due to the blurring of boundaries between work and everyday life. Soft tools, such as organizational meaningfulness (OM) and work-related well-being (WB), mediate the relationship between working from home (HW) and work-life conflicts (WLC), lessening the negative implications of working from home on work-life balance.

Practical implications

The design and the implementation of home-based telecommuting arrangements should include a special concern for soft TQM practices. Among others, OM and WB are likely to minimize the disruption of remote employees' jobs and interpersonal relationships. Failure to do so impairs the ability of home-based employees to make sense out of their working arrangements and to achieve a sustainable work-life balance.

Originality/value

This is one of the first attempts to illuminate the side effects of home-based telecommuting and to investigate the role of soft TQM in addressing these side effects.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Rocco Palumbo

Team autonomy involves empowering employees to achieve greater control over organizational dynamics. Such empowerment may augment the employees’ vigor, dedication and…

Abstract

Purpose

Team autonomy involves empowering employees to achieve greater control over organizational dynamics. Such empowerment may augment the employees’ vigor, dedication and absorption at work. However, there is limited evidence on the contents of the relationship between team autonomy and work engagement. This paper aims to fill in this gap, shedding light into the manifold implications of team autonomy on employees’ work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A serial mediation analysis was designed to collect evidence of the effects of team autonomy on work engagement. Drawing on self-determination theory, social comparison theory and social facilitation theory, team member-supervisor exchanges and organizational climate were contemplated in the analysis as mediating variables. An ordinary least square regression-based model relying on 5,000 bootstrap samples was implemented. The study focused on a large sample of Europeans employed in the manufacturing sector (n = 4,588).

Findings

Team autonomy had tiny, but statistically significant effects on work engagement. Good relationships between team members and supervisors positively mediated the effects of team autonomy on work engagement. Conversely, the organizational climate did not have a significant mediating role. A statistically significant serial mediation effect linked team autonomy and work engagement via team member-supervisor exchanges and organizational climate.

Practical implications

Team autonomy contributes to increasing the employees’ vigor, dedication and absorption at work. The enhancement of team member-supervisor relationships fosters the engagement of team members who experience a greater autonomy at work. The effects of team autonomy on organizational climate are ambiguous and mediated by an improvement of the relationships between team members and supervisors.

Originality/value

The paper originally investigates the implications of team autonomy on work engagement, emphasizing the importance of social exchanges at work to realize the full potential of team autonomy.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Rocco Palumbo, Rosalba Manna and Mauro Cavallone

Managerialization – i.e. the institutional and organizational transformation of cultural institutions acknowledging the need for a managerial action to address their value…

Abstract

Purpose

Managerialization – i.e. the institutional and organizational transformation of cultural institutions acknowledging the need for a managerial action to address their value propositions – is radically reshaping the way museums interact with relevant stakeholders and arrange their service offering. The paper aims at making sense out of the manifold implications of managerialization on museum activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data were collected from a sample of 4,073 Italian museums and art institutions. A logit regression model was designed to investigate the implications of museums’ managerialization on pricing strategies, service offering, organizational and marketing policies, inter-organizational relationships and digitalization.

Findings

Managerialization triggered an evolution in museums’ service offering and organizational practices. Institutions that underwent a managerial development were more likely to innovate their policies and strategies. However, managerialization may undermine the way museums focus on disadvantaged people, nurturing inequalities in the access to their service offering.

Practical implications

The managerialization of museums should be handled as a double-edged sword. Although it contributes in enriching the museums’ service offering and in differentiating their activities, it may generate drawbacks on the art institutions’ ability to address the demands of underprivileged groups. Tailored correctives are needed to avoid the side effects of managerialization.

Originality/value

This is one of the first attempts to investigate the implications of managerialization on museums’ practices and inter-organizational relationships. The research findings provide some insights into the challenges that are related to the managerialization of museums and art institutions.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Rocco Palumbo

Organizational innovation relies on the employees' active participation in improving extant processes and practices. In particular, it has been argued that employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational innovation relies on the employees' active participation in improving extant processes and practices. In particular, it has been argued that employees' engagement triggers innovation-oriented behaviors at work. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of evidence of the implications of work engagement on the health professionals' innovation propensity. The article intends to push forward what we currently know about this issue, providing some food for thought to scholars and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

A path analysis based on ordinary least square (OLS) regression and 10,000 bootstrap samples was designed to investigate the direct and indirect implications of employees' engagement on innovative behaviors at work in a large sample of health professionals operating in Europe. The quality of employee–manager relationships and the organizational climate were included as mediating variables affecting the relationship between work engagement and propensity to innovation-oriented behaviors.

Findings

The research findings highlighted that being engaged at work fosters the willingness of health professionals to partake in the improvement of organizational processes and practices. The positive implications of employees' engagement on innovative behaviors at work are catalyzed by good employee–manager relationships and a positive organizational climate.

Practical implications

Healthcare organizations should uphold the health professional's engagement to enhance their innovation potential. Targeted interventions are needed to merge work engagement with the enhancement of the organizational environment in which health professionals accomplish their activities. A positive organizational climate enacts an empowering work environment, which further incentivizes innovation.

Originality/value

The article adopts a micro-level perspective to investigate the triggers of innovative behaviors among healthcare professionals, providing evidence which is relevant for theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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