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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Jamal Khan and Wayne Charles‐Saverall

Examines the relationships and problems that exist between thetheory and practice of human resource development in the public sector.Aims at enhancing the capability of…

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1406

Abstract

Examines the relationships and problems that exist between the theory and practice of human resource development in the public sector. Aims at enhancing the capability of human resource management systems to adapt and respond proactively to a constantly changing environment in the 1990s and beyond. Identifies and analyses the evolution and development of human resource management systems in the Barbados public sector with special reference to the role of the personnel agencies, systemic as well as sectoral problems, policy/political constraints and the relationships between management capability and national development.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

John Storm Pedersen and Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

The paper discusses the balance between values and economic efficiency in the public sector in comparison with the private sector. The argument is that the public sector…

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1644

Abstract

Purpose

The paper discusses the balance between values and economic efficiency in the public sector in comparison with the private sector. The argument is that the public sector, hence the public welfare service institutions, can learn much from the private service sector, hence the private service firms with regard to the relation to values, ethics, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and efficiency in order to improve the balance between values and efficiency in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the concept of balance in relation to the development of the management of private service companies as a useful alternative to new public management (NPM). It discusses this with regard to three issues: the evolution of the management of private companies; what can the public sector, hence the public welfare institutions, learn from the evolution of management of private companies? How would it be possible for governments to work for an alternative to NPM, on the basis of the experiences of management of private companies, improving the balance between values and economic efficiency in the public sector?

Findings

It is argued that a deadlock in the development of efficiency management in the public sector, hence in the public welfare service institutions, is created. It is argued, furthermore, that this deadlock to a great extent, paradoxically, is created because of the focusing on NPM for almost two decades as the most important tool to develop efficiency management in the public sector. Finally, it is argued that the experiences in private companies regarding how to find a proper balance between values, ethics, CSR and economic efficiency can be very helpful in developing a strategy within the public sector to unlock the deadlock regarding the development of efficiency management. That is why the experiences of management of the private services companies can become a constructive alternative to the experiences of NPM in the public sector at the level of welfare institutions.

Research limitations/implications

There would be potential for more research on CSR, business ethics and values‐driven management in relation to the public sector.

Originality/value

The paper offers new insight into the relation between values, CSR and management models in the private and in the public sector.

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2022

Tomi Rajala and Harri Laihonen

Lack of knowledge and performance information sharing between actors is one manifestation of fragmentation in public performance management. This study aims to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

Lack of knowledge and performance information sharing between actors is one manifestation of fragmentation in public performance management. This study aims to understand what managerial means are used for connecting performance dialogues and how these means affect fragmentation in performance management.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional research design, the authors reviewed documents, interviewed public managers, observed workshops and held thematic discussions with public managers in one Finnish municipality. To analyze the empirical data, the authors used thematic analysis and both inductive and deductive research approaches.

Findings

The analysis revealed nine managerial means that public managers use for connecting performance dialogues to decrease fragmentation. These were (1) defining the division of labor between different dialogues, (2) assigning resources for performance dialogues, (3) generating convincing narratives for promoting collaboration, (4) providing the same performance information to collaborators, (5) building joint information systems, (6) establishing integrative performance dialogue hubs, (7) naming the gatekeepers, (8) offering training for dialogues and (9) synchronizing performance dialogues. Based on our findings, most of these means can preserve, increase or decrease fragmentation depending on their design.

Originality/value

The results of the study are valuable because the performance management literature has not investigated what managerial means are used to connect performance dialogues and how these means can preserve, increase or decrease fragmentation.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Mateusz Lewandowski

Performance management is the ‘Achilles heel’ of many reforms and public management practices and requires changes. Governance in general and co-production in particular…

Abstract

Performance management is the ‘Achilles heel’ of many reforms and public management practices and requires changes. Governance in general and co-production in particular impose an organizational setting which requires rethinking performance management, which is still conceptually embedded in New Public Management paradigm. This chapter builds on the latest co-production framework and service-dominant logic and outlines new challenges for rethinking performance measurement and management. It also discusses how public service design (PSD) may interact with them. As a result the need to shift between performance control loops has been emphasized, suggesting that service design may significantly support internal ex-nunc performance management. Although it should be facilitated in addressing some of the performance challenges, an outline of a framework for appropriate method has also been proposed.

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Cross-Sectoral Relations in the Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-172-0

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2006

Andrew Gray and Bill Jenkins

It is a point of continuing debate whether the study of public administration can in any circumstances be graced by a disciplinary label. Rhodes (1996), for example, has…

Abstract

It is a point of continuing debate whether the study of public administration can in any circumstances be graced by a disciplinary label. Rhodes (1996), for example, has argued that the study of British public administration was traditionally insular, dominated for a long period by an institutionalist tradition characterized by an interest in administrative engineering, but a distaste for theory. As Rhodes also observes, this position emphasized, albeit in a traditional sense, the political and ethical context of administration public administration existed within a wider framework of accountability relationships and political and moral responsibilities. We might add to this the way government and public administration was seen as linked within a framework of administrative law, which, while not formalized in the sense of continental Europe, was important.

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Comparative Public Administration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-453-9

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Abstract

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Intellectual Capital and Public Sector Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-169-4

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Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2017

Kaidi Aher and Vilma Luoma-Aho

Change in the public sector appears to be often met with practices borrowed from the private sector. However, implementing private sector practices is challenging (Brown…

Abstract

Change in the public sector appears to be often met with practices borrowed from the private sector. However, implementing private sector practices is challenging (Brown, Waterhouse, & Flynn, 2003), as, for example, the range of stakeholders and their legitimate demands are greater in the public sector (Wæraas & Byrkjeflot, 2012; Leitch & Davenport, 2002), and due to the political nature of affairs, there is more complexity and uncertainty (Sanders & Canel, 2013). In fact, when it comes to change, the public sector can be very different from the private sector due to its often more bureaucratic processes, political nature of decisions and obligations for both transparency and equality.

This chapter focuses on three core areas of organisational change communication: organisational culture, employees and management. The chapter reports findings from a systematic literature review of articles from 1990 to 2016 using thematic analysis in order to answer three research questions: Is change in the public sector different from change in the private sector? What is the perceived role of communication for public sector change efforts? What insights can be found from previous literature about three topics connected with change communication: employees, organisational culture and management?

To begin, we ask whether it is actually true that public sector change differs from private sector change. Then we will examine the results of the literature review on each of these three aspects: (1) organisational culture, (2) public sector employees and (3) change management. We will summarise our findings and will conclude with three propositions for future studies on public sector change communication, which all highlight the rising importance of engagement.

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How Strategic Communication Shapes Value and Innovation in Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-716-4

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Issei Suzuki and Masanori Koizumi

This research focused on the management dynamics between library districts' discretion and privatization of library management. Previous research has reported conflicting…

Abstract

Purpose

This research focused on the management dynamics between library districts' discretion and privatization of library management. Previous research has reported conflicting effects of this dynamic. However, few studies have investigated privatization of library management by library districts. Additionally, previous research has accepted the premise that when public libraries change from general-purpose government to library districts, they will not implement privatization prior to forming districts. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether conflicting effects arise in the dynamics between library districts' discretion and privatization in library management.

Design/methodology/approach

To address research gaps, an in-depth case analysis was conducted of the Jackson County Library District in Oregon, where library management has been privatized both before and after library district formation. The analysis divided the study period into three phases, which differed by legal basis and operating body. To clarify the characteristics of library management in each phase, changes in finances, staff hiring and library services were analyzed.

Findings

In Phase 1, privatization was implemented in response to the financial difficulties of the public library run by the county government. In Phase 2, the library district was formed with the aim of stabilizing revenue and securing management autonomy. During Phase 3, the library district and operating body were both operated by a private company. Although the financial resources of the library district were stable, it was unable to implement autonomous library management. This demonstrates that privatization cannot facilitate autonomous management, an advantage of library districts.

Originality/value

By investigating the conflicting effects of the dynamics between library district discretion and privatization, this research contributes to greater understanding in the fields of public management and library science.

Details

Library Management, vol. 42 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Paula van Veen-Dirks and Anneke Giliam

Purpose – This study focuses on the relationship between local governments and public sector joint ventures (JVs). Public sector JVs are separate administrative entities…

Abstract

Purpose – This study focuses on the relationship between local governments and public sector joint ventures (JVs). Public sector JVs are separate administrative entities that undertake public service activities on behalf of local governments. The aim of this study is to examine the vertical management control packages that are used by local governments to control the relationship with their public sector JVs.

Design/methodology/approach – Two case studies have been conducted in two public sector JVs, owned jointly by more than 20 local governments. The analysis of the two cases is informed by an integrated conceptual framework describing how transactional and relational factors influence control, trust, and risk in the context of public sector JVs.

Findings – The case studies provide a nuanced understanding of the interplay between the vertical management control packages, trust between the parents and the public sector JVs, and risks as perceived by the local governments. The case findings not only reveal how local governments struggle with adequate outcome control but also highlight how and why they rely on behavioral control. A related finding is that while the probability of poor business performance does not have a significant impact on the design of the vertical control packages, the social impact of failure has the potential to create a sense of urgency with regard to changes in the design of vertical management control packages.

Originality/value – This study adds to the literature on interorganizational relationships by providing insight into the use of vertical management control packages in the specific, but relevant, setting of public sector JVs.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Bríd Quinn

The purpose of this chapter is to consider a public value(s) approach as a response to the challenges besetting public management and to investigate the implications of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to consider a public value(s) approach as a response to the challenges besetting public management and to investigate the implications of such an approach for management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter investigates the concepts of public value and public values and their influence on the norms and practices of public management. It then focuses on the way in which management education has responded to a changing context resulting in innovation and realignment in order to enable public managers to espouse public values and achieve public value. The chapter concludes by exploring the philosophical and practical impact of a public value(s) approach in mid-career public management education.

Findings

A public value(s) approach provides not only a relevant discursive framework for public managers but also an appropriate mode of management for the changeable context in which they work. This changes their expectations of mid-career education and influences programme content and pedagogy, enabling innovation and experimentation.

Practical implications

The chapter identifies and analyses the benefits, outcomes and challenges of the public values(s) approach in the mid-career classroom.

Details

Developing Public Managers for a Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-080-0

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