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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Karrie Ann Snyder, Alexandra Tate and Ethan Roubenoff

Encouraging patient involvement is a cornerstone of many healthcare interventions and decision-making models to ensure that treatment decisions reflect the needs, values…

Abstract

Purpose

Encouraging patient involvement is a cornerstone of many healthcare interventions and decision-making models to ensure that treatment decisions reflect the needs, values, and desires of patients. Involved patients are thought to be empowered patients who feel a sense of efficacy in regards to their own health. However, there is a lack of understanding of how patients relate to empowerment and involvement and, most importantly, how these constructs relate to one another in patients’ decision-making experiences.

Methodology/approach

Through an inductive analysis, this chapter draws on qualitative interviews of women diagnosed with breast cancer prior to 40 years of age (n = 69).

Findings

By examining the intersection of how patients define their own involvement in treatment decisions and their sense of empowerment, we find four orientations to decision-making (Advocates, Bystanders, Co-Pilots, and Downplayers) with involvement and empowerment being coupled for some respondents, but decoupled for others.

Research limitations/implications

Our findings suggest expanding what it means to be an “active” patient as respondents had multiple ways of characterizing involvement, including being informed or following their doctor’s advice. Our findings also suggest a more critical examination of the origins and potential downsides of patient empowerment as some respondents reported feeling overwhelmed or pushed into advocacy roles. The sample was disproportionately higher socioeconomic status with limited racial/ethnic diversity. Empowerment and involvement may be enacted differently for other social groups and other medical conditions.

Originality/value

By examining first-person patient narratives, we conclude that patients’ experience may not fully align with current academic or clinical discussions of patient involvement or empowerment.

Details

Gender, Women’s Health Care Concerns and Other Social Factors in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-175-5

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Adelaide Ippolito, Francesco Smaldone and Margherita Ruberto

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research framework for exploring and improving patient empowerment through the analysis of the effects produced by a satisfying…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research framework for exploring and improving patient empowerment through the analysis of the effects produced by a satisfying physician relationship on patient involvement in the healthcare process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors begin with a literature review of patient empowerment in healthcare, useful to highlight the importance of relational aspects. Then, the authors tested the hypotheses of the research through the analysis of 450 questionnaires. The results are analyzed through covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

This paper highlights how empowerment is a more complex phenomenon, needing many dimensions to be investigated. The hypotheses were tested, and correlations computed, highlighting a medium-strong positive correlation between physician relationship and patient involvement determining satisfying patient empowerment.

Research limitations/implications

The considerations conducted in the paper are restricted to physician relationship and needs further research aimed to analyze and evaluate the changes in the patient behaviors influenced by empowerment.

Practical implications

The research points offer new insight into patient empowerment and allow the healthcare provider to create new opportunities for promoting patient empowerment through the development of quality relationship for effective patient involvement.

Originality/value

The study developed contributes new insight about patient empowerment in the healthcare management literature, proving the key role of satisfying physician relationship useful for future researches.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Robyn Ouschan, Jillian Sweeney and Lester Johnson

Several trends such as improved access to health care information via the internet, the growth of self‐help groups and expenditure on alternative medicine signals…

Abstract

Purpose

Several trends such as improved access to health care information via the internet, the growth of self‐help groups and expenditure on alternative medicine signals consumers are taking an active role in their own health management. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes and asthma require a significant amount of self‐management and thus call for a collaborative patient‐physician relationship. This study explores whether empowering patient‐physician consultations measured through three patient empowerment dimensions (patient control, patient participation, physician support) enhance patients trust in and commitment to their physician.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive mail survey of adults registered with one of four different chronic illness associations in Australia was conducted to collect the data.

Findings

The structural equation modelling results show that patients are more trusting of and committed to physicians who adopt an empowering communication style with them.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the Australian healthcare context. Thus, future multinational studies should explore suitable strategies to empower healthcare consumers that build on the constraints placed by diverse healthcare systems.

Practical implications

In a managed health care and cost cutting climate where patient trust is deteriorating, these findings suggest that empowering patients presents a means to improve the patient‐physician relationship.

Originality/value

Whilst numerous marketing scholars have researched the empowerment of staff, there is a shortage of studies that address the meaning and outcomes of consumer empowerment. This study proposes a unique communication based consumer empowerment construct which is shown to impact on consumer‐service provider relationships.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Young Mee Kim and Se Young Kim

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships between structural empowerment and patient identification behaviors of nurses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships between structural empowerment and patient identification behaviors of nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study was a descriptive survey using a self-reported questionnaire, following a quality improvement project at a hospital in South Korea. The participants included 984 registered nurses, who administer medication and transfusions to patients in the hospital. Data were analyzed using the t-test, ANOVA, Scheffé’s test, Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The patient identification behaviors of nurses were significantly correlated with opportunity, support, information, resources, formal power and informal power of structural empowerment. The support, information and informal power of structural empowerment, as well as the age and gender of the participants explained 10.7 percent of the variance in the patient identification behaviors of nurses.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has some limitations. Although the data collected by the cross-sectional survey were analyzed, causal analysis could not have been conducted. Nursing managers can promote safety by creating a work environment that facilitates access to the support, information and resources needed for nurses to perform their duties effectively; providing opportunities for nurses to learn and develop professionally; acknowledging the achievements of nurses; and expanding their duties, so that nurses can demonstrate greater work flexibility. Future studies should investigate structural empowerment in multiple nursing organizations, and particularly the organizational characteristics that affect structural empowerment.

Originality/value

The present study confirms that structural empowerment influences the patient identification behaviors of nurses.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Shwadhin Sharma and Anita Khadka

Drawing on the taxonomy of patient empowerment and a sense of community (SoC), the purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that impact the intention of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the taxonomy of patient empowerment and a sense of community (SoC), the purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that impact the intention of the individual to continue using online social health support community for their chronic disease management.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was used to collect the data from multiple online social health support groups related to chronic disease management. The survey yielded a total of 246 usable responses.

Findings

The primary findings from this study indicate that the informational support – not the nurturant support such as emotional, network, and esteem support – are the major types of support people are seeking from an online social health support community. This research also found that patient empowerment and SoC would positively impact their intention to continue using the online health community.

Research limitations/implications

This study utilized a survey design method may limit precision and realism. Also, there is the self-selection bias as the respondents self-selected themselves to take the survey.

Practical implications

The findings can help the community managers or webmasters to design strategies for the promotion and diffusion of online social health group among patient of chronic disease. Those strategies should focus on patient’s empowerment through action facilitating and social support and through creating a SoC.

Originality/value

An innovative research model integrates patient empowerment and a SoC to study patient’s chronic disease management through online social health groups to fill the existing research gap.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Andrea Moretta Tartaglione, Ylenia Cavacece, Fabio Cassia and Giuseppe Russo

Nowadays, international healthcare agendas are focused on patient centeredness. Policies are aimed at improving patient’s satisfaction by enhancing patient empowerment and…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays, international healthcare agendas are focused on patient centeredness. Policies are aimed at improving patient’s satisfaction by enhancing patient empowerment and value co-creation. However, a comprehensive model addressing the relationships between these constructs has not so far been developed. The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a model which explains the effects of patient empowerment and value co-creation on patients’ satisfaction with the quality of the services they experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The links between patient satisfaction, empowerment and value co-creation are theoretically outlined via an in-depth literature review. The resulting model is tested through a survey administered to 186 chronically ill patients. The results are analyzed through covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that patient empowerment positively influences value co-creation which, in turn, is positively related to patient satisfaction. In addition, the analysis reveals that patient empowerment has no direct effects on satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Although the cross-sectional design made it possible to clearly estimate the relationships among variables, it overlooked the longitudinal dimensions of co-creation processes.

Practical implications

The study provides practitioners with suggestions to design patient-centered healthcare services by leveraging on patient knowledge, participation, responsibility in care and involvement in the value-creation process.

Originality/value

Over the last decade, healthcare management literature has shifted its focus from healthcare organizations to patients. The number of contributions about patient satisfaction, empowerment and value co-creation exponentially increased. However, these dimensions are often studied separately. This work advances available knowledge by clarifying and testing the relationships between these three constructs.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Allen C. Johnston, James L. Worrell, Paul M. Di Gangi and Molly Wasko

The purpose of this paper is to examine how participation in an online health community provides for direct benefits in the form of information utility and social support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how participation in an online health community provides for direct benefits in the form of information utility and social support and an indirect influence on perceptions of patient empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method approach was conducted involving interviews with moderators of 18 online health communities and a field survey of 153 online health community participants.

Findings

Online health community participation leads to direct benefits in the form of information utility and social support and that information utility also helps to shape perceptions of patient empowerment among community participants.

Research limitations/implications

This research calls into question the role of online health communities as a support mechanism to empower patients to take ownership over their healthcare treatment. Online health communities support the development of patient empowerment by creating and disseminating information that can be used to gain an understanding of a patient's health condition.

Practical implications

Purveyors of online health communities must be able to ensure a high level of engagement among community participants that allows for each member to elicit outcomes such as information utility, while simultaneously guarding against undesirable circumstances that may prohibit a positive experience.

Social implications

Medical professionals can utilize the results of this study to develop strategies for incorporating online health communities into patient care. Specifically, medical professionals can use these results to identify relevant communities and engage in information sharing to ensure relevant and accurate information is disseminated to patients as they seek out information concerning their health conditions.

Originality/value

As an ever growing segment of the population looks to online health communities for health information seeking and emotional support, we still know very little as to the type of support that is provided by these forums and how benefits obtained from participation help to shape patient empowerment outcomes. This study determined that information utility and social support are two benefits obtained by online health community participants and that information utility also helps to shape perceptions of patient empowerment among community participants.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2007

Nira Shalom

This paper discusses the need for health information specialists who can promote patient empowerment by tailoring the information patients receive as they cope with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the need for health information specialists who can promote patient empowerment by tailoring the information patients receive as they cope with illness. The objectives of this study are to distinguish the various stages of coping with illness, examine the informational needs of patients during these stages, explore how web information contributes to patient empowerment, and describe the potential role of the health information specialist.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to meet the study's objectives, a qualitative research method was used in which 110 in‐depth interviews were conducted with patients who told their story of coping throughout the course of illness. By distinguishing and understanding the different stages of coping with illness, we came to distinguish the distinct informational needs during the coping process, and understand how web information contributes to patient empowerment.

Findings

The process of coping with illness has four stages. In each stage, the patient's informational needs differ, as does his ability to absorb and process information. Health systems do not provide information to match the coping stage of the patient. Patients turn to professional (hospitals, universities) and unprofessional (forums, blogs) internet sites in their search for medical knowledge. The current study, integrated with other studies that show patients' difficulties using the internet, emphasizes the importance of the information specialist in the patient empowerment process.

Originality/value

The study will aid policy makers in the process of empowering patients by demonstrating patients' dynamic informational needs when coping with illness. This study proposes a role for the information specialists that will enable them to expand into the health domain. This role is the health information specialist, a professional who will, among other things, learn how health systems work, identify types of web information sources, assess medical site quality, recognize patients' coping stages, and adapt information to individual characteristics.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Rocco Palumbo, Carmela Annarumma, Paola Adinolfi and Marco Musella

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changing patterns of users’ behavior in the health care service system. Although patient engagement and health services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changing patterns of users’ behavior in the health care service system. Although patient engagement and health services’ co-production are understood as essential ingredients in the recipe for sustainable health systems, some determinants to patient involvement are still widely neglected by both policy makers and health care professionals. Among others, inadequate health literacy performs as a significant barrier to patient empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey aimed at objectively measuring health literacy-related skills was administered to a random sample of 600 Italian patients. The Italian version of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) was used to assess the ability of the respondents to deal with written health information. Moreover, the respondents were asked to self-report their ability to navigate the health system. It was presumed that inadequate health literacy as measured by the NVS is related with impaired self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies, paving the way for the inability and the unwillingness of patients to be involved in the health care provision.

Findings

About half of the sample showed inadequate health literacy. However, poor NVS scores were only slightly associated with limited self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies. In general, patients with inadequate health-related skills were not likely to be engaged in the provision of health services. Elderly, people suffering from financial deprivation and less educated individuals were found to be at special risk of living with limited health literacy.

Practical implications

Limited health literacy is a common and relevant issue among people dealing with the health care service system. The impaired ability to collect, process, and use health information produces barriers to patient engagement and prevents the evolution of patients’ behavior toward health care co-production.

Originality/value

Health literacy is a widely overlooked issue in the Italian national health system. This paper contributes in shedding light on the determinants and effects of health literacy of Italian hospital patients. Besides, some insights on the validity of the methodological tools typically used to assess health-related skills are provided.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Yusi Cheng, Wei Wei, Yunying Zhong and Lu Zhang

This paper aims to explore how hospitable telemedicine services empowered patients during the COVID-19. Expanding from the technology aspect, this research integrated the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how hospitable telemedicine services empowered patients during the COVID-19. Expanding from the technology aspect, this research integrated the philosophy of hospitality organizational culture by including factors related to human-human interaction as significant predictors for patients’ sense of empowerment (perceived competence and control) in coping with their emotional stress (anxiety and isolation).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 409 general consumers who have used video-based virtual consultation since February 2020. Stepwise multiple regression and simple linear regression analyses were used for hypotheses testing.

Findings

The results reveal that the doctors’ reliability, responsiveness and empathy significantly predict patients’ perceived competence and control. Perceived usefulness and convenience of telemedicine technology enhance patients’ perceived competence and control. Patients’ sense of empowerment significantly reduces their anxiety and sense of isolation.

Research limitations/implications

To fully understand the role of hospitality in people’s telemedicine experiences, future studies are encouraged to not only examine the patients-clinicians interactions but also explore the patients-support staff interactions.

Practical implications

Health care providers’ “bed-side” manners empower patients in managing their emotional stress. Health care providers should be trained for their empathetic ability and communication skills. Strategies such as collaborating with hospitality schools and business schools can be implemented to help build medical student’s patient-centric attitudes and skills.

Originality/value

This paper provided empirical evidence for the value of hospitality in health care and offered useful suggestions for health care providers, especially by empowering vulnerable people during catastrophic events such as COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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