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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Richard Shepherd

Food choice is influenced by a range of factors, including sensoryattributes and beliefs about the nutritional value of the foods. It isdifficult to determine the relative…

Abstract

Food choice is influenced by a range of factors, including sensory attributes and beliefs about the nutritional value of the foods. It is difficult to determine the relative importance of beliefs about nutritional and sensory attributes to foods. It is necessary to examine these within an overall framework. The attitudes model developed by Fishbein and Ajzen is presented as a framework within which such comparisons can be made. It has been shown to be useful in a variety of studies of food choice. The relative importance of different types of beliefs can be assessed within this approach by examining the relationship between individual beliefs (or groups of beliefs) and either attitude or behaviour. In a number of studies sensory attributes have been found to be more important for table salt use, snack food consumption and consumption of foods contributing highly to fat in the diet. In the case of low‐fat milk consumption, however, nutritional beliefs were found to be more important than beliefs about the sensory attributes of the milks or their suitability for different uses.

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British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Richard Shepherd

At the Institute of Food Research in Reading a new Department of Food Acceptability was formed in April 1989. This includes sections investigating sensory responses to…

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Abstract

At the Institute of Food Research in Reading a new Department of Food Acceptability was formed in April 1989. This includes sections investigating sensory responses to foods, food appearance and flavour chemistry. There is also a section devoted to investigating the reasons for people's choice of foods, that is, the psychology of food choice.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 90 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Anne de Looy and Pamela Turner

A New Centre for Food Research was created in September 1993 atQueen Margaret College, Edinburgh. Its main purpose is to promoteresearch into food choice, particularly…

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298

Abstract

A New Centre for Food Research was created in September 1993 at Queen Margaret College, Edinburgh. Its main purpose is to promote research into food choice, particularly factors influencing choice such as sensory, socio‐cultural and nutritional aspects. Research undertaken involves a multi‐disciplinary approach by bringing together expertise from various disciplines including consumer sciences, dietetics and nutrition, food science, social sciences and hospitality studies. A one‐day symposium “Food research in Europe” was held in 1994 to mark the Centre′s official launch. The symposium was well attended, with delegates representing a wide range of organizations in the UK and other EU countries. Presentations were given by eminent speakers and researchers – Dr David Lindsay, MAFF; Dr Ronan Gormley, The National Food Centre in Dublin; Dr David Kilcast, Leatherhead Food Research Association; Dr Wendy Brown and Dr Richard Shepherd, both from the Institute of Food Research, Reading. The centre′s major research interests and activities are related to fruit and vegetable consumption (sensory qualities of apples; barriers to consumption); the relationship between snacking, body weight and physical activity; healthy eating award schemes in the UK.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 95 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Paul Buckley and Richard Shepherd

The Government has recently made public its response to the FoodAdvisory Committee′s review of food labelling practices. Among theaccepted recommendations, the…

Abstract

The Government has recently made public its response to the Food Advisory Committee′s review of food labelling practices. Among the accepted recommendations, the presentation of labelling information is recognized to be of key importance. Presents a review of the ergonomic factors which affect the clarity of pack information and discusses the relevance of these findings for the design of effective food labelling.

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British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Lynn J. Frewer, Chaya Howard and Richard Shepherd

Discusses the importance of effective risk‐benefit communication about genetic engineering in food production. The consumer, industry and science are all likely to benefit…

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1646

Abstract

Discusses the importance of effective risk‐benefit communication about genetic engineering in food production. The consumer, industry and science are all likely to benefit from the creation of an “informed consumer”. There is a need to develop strategies to maximize the effectiveness of such communication, in order to reach target audiences. Risk‐benefit communication is likely to require a different approach to that which has evolved from the communication of risk information alone. Investigates future research needs and concludes that risk‐benefit communication will usefully invoke public debate about future directions for technological evolution and development.

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British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Lynn J. Frewer, Chaya Howard and Richard Shepherd

Presents experimental work which attempts to understand whatpsychological mechanisms are likely to influence consumer acceptance ofgenetically engineered food, and the…

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3999

Abstract

Presents experimental work which attempts to understand what psychological mechanisms are likely to influence consumer acceptance of genetically engineered food, and the relationship between consumer attitudes towards the technology and consumer acceptance of its products. Discusses the relationship between consumer risk perceptions and consumer reactions; the influence of public knowledge and understanding of the technology on attitudes; media impact; ethical concern; and the importance of perceived need for the technology. Concludes that the most important determinant of consumer acceptance of genetic engineering in food technology is likely to be perceptions of benefit resulting from application of the technology. Suggests that the success of communication strategies is likely to depend on effective provision of information regarding the tangible benefits of the technology, although it is important that a dialogue be established between communicators and the lay public, so that issues addressed reflect the real concerns of the public.

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British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Paul Sparks, Monique M. Raats, Moira A. Geekie, Richard Shepherd and Claire Dale

Outlines research on the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded project Communication strategies for the Promotion of Dietary Change. With a view to general…

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1602

Abstract

Outlines research on the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food‐funded project Communication strategies for the Promotion of Dietary Change. With a view to general dietary recommendations and to Health of the Nation targets, the focus of this three‐year project is the promotion of dietary change through information provision. A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the Institute of Food Research, Reading, is conducting the research, drawing on a number of different theoretical perspectives and methodological procedures. Pays special emphasis to the issue of fat consumption, summarizes the practical role of the theory of planned behaviour, the elaboration‐likelihood model and unrealistic optimism research, and outlines the development of a novel food and drink diary. Advocates a multidisciplinary, integrative approach to information‐based health promotion efforts.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Richard Shepherd, Claire M. Paisley, Paul Sparks, Annie S. Anderson, Susan Eley and Mike E.J. Lean

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their…

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3476

Abstract

Describes work carried out on a two‐year Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF)‐funded project of the constraints on freedom of dietary choice and their implications for the adoption and maintenance of healthy diets. Looks at whether there are differences in diet knowledge and preferences between people on different income levels.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Zhao Cai, Hefu Liu, Qian Huang, Yue Kang and Liang Liang

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship between psychological contract and knowledge sharing behavior in the enterprise system (ES) post-implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship between psychological contract and knowledge sharing behavior in the enterprise system (ES) post-implementation stage. The fulfillment and obligation of psychological contract are proposed as antecedents of knowledge sharing behavior performed by client firms. Additionally, entrepreneurial orientation (EO) is considered a moderator in the relationship between psychological contract and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted the questionnaire survey to collect data from 132 client firms of a focal ES provider in the garment industry of China. Hierarchical regression analysis was used for data analysis.

Findings

Psychological contract fulfillment is negatively related to knowledge sharing, whereas the positive role of psychological contract obligation is supported. EOstrengthens the role of both psychological contract fulfillment and obligation in shaping knowledge sharing behavior of client firms.

Originality/value

This study adopts forward- and backward-looking approaches in decision making as a theoretical lens to investigate how to improve client firms’ knowledge sharing behavior through psychological contract. By figuring out the roles of psychological contract and EO in influencing knowledge sharing, this research benefits both vendor and client firms in maintaining sustainable collaboration and continuous improvement of ES projects.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1945

ALEC CRAIG

For adequate bibliographical information about Baudelaire's works one must go to collected editions by no means readily available in Great Britain. Information concerning…

Abstract

For adequate bibliographical information about Baudelaire's works one must go to collected editions by no means readily available in Great Britain. Information concerning the extensive literature about Baudelaire is still farther to seek. For the English reader the bibliography in Arthur Symons's study mentioned below has not been superseded, although important editions of Baudelaire's works have been issued and much written about him since 1920.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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