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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Mika Toyota and Biao Xiang

This article aims to explain how a transnational “retirement industry” in Southeast Asia has emerged recently as a result of interplays between various national and…

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2217

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explain how a transnational “retirement industry” in Southeast Asia has emerged recently as a result of interplays between various national and transnational forces, particularly in the domain of elderly care. “Retirement industry” refers to business operations related to the relocation of foreign retirees, primarily Japanese pensioners, who seek affordable social care and alternative retirement life.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on extensive documentary studies and multi‐sited ethnographic research from 2004 to date. In‐depth interviews with retirees and relevant agencies were carried out in Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines and Indonesia.

Findings

This article delineates how demographic and economic changes in Japan create demand for the transnational retirement industry, and how Southeast Asian countries actively promote the industry as a national development strategy. As such the boundaries between nation‐state and between the market and the state are simultaneously crossed. The industry opens new transnational routes and spaces and thus further complicates the transnationalization of elderly care in Asia.

Originality/value

Current research on social welfare remains dominated by methodological nationalism, and this article calls attention to the transnational dimension in understanding recent changes in social care. By engaging the predominant paradigm of “care diamond”, the article shows that how boundaries shift between various care providers within nation states is inextricably related to how borders are crossed between nation states.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 32 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Barbara Kirsh

Using a life course perspective, this chapter examines four twentieth-century US generations and the influence of generation on women, especially related to education…

Abstract

Using a life course perspective, this chapter examines four twentieth-century US generations and the influence of generation on women, especially related to education, work life, and retirement. The Baby Boomers constitute the largest of these birth cohorts to move into retirement. A literature review and illustrative examples of trends explore whether the substantial social and legal changes, with accompanying norms and values, that influenced Baby Boomers’ earlier lives continue to characterize their approach to retirement. Social, medical, and legal changes increased access to education, work life, and longer lifespans for many Boomer women. However, substantial socioeconomic and racial inequality must be addressed to expand access to a healthy, satisfying, and financially adequate retirement stage for men and women Boomers and following generations.

Details

Gender and Generations: Continuity and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-033-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Terence Y. M. Lam and Junjie Yan

Shanghai is currently faced with a rapid increase in the ageing population and demand for elderly homes. Continuing care retirement community (CCRC) has been emerging as a…

Abstract

Purpose

Shanghai is currently faced with a rapid increase in the ageing population and demand for elderly homes. Continuing care retirement community (CCRC) has been emerging as a high-end alternative to offer specialised accommodation to the elderly in major cities. Since the first development in 2008, the industry is now still at the infancy stage. This study aims to examine the investment barriers hindering the supply and demand of CCRCs with an aim to recommend practical and senior housing policy measures to facilitate CCRC developments.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple-case study method was used to confirm whether the literature findings on investment barriers apply to the context of Shanghai. Four representative CCRC development cases in Shanghai were examined, in which qualitative data were collected from interviews with experienced CCRC development managers and quantitative data from a questionnaire survey of the CCRC residents.

Findings

Operation management experience, financial risks and government support policy were found to be the main supply barriers. Chinese traditional family-oriented culture and affordability were not the main demand barriers of CCRCs in Shanghai. Poor quality of services and living environment were identified as the main barriers suppressing the demand for CCRC.

Research limitations/implications

Although common trends and views can be drawn from the representative cases in Shanghai to provide valid results, further research should be conducted on other major cities in China so that the results can be widely applied.

Practical implications

Successful CCRC investment strategy should focus on partnering with experienced professional eldercare management companies, provisions of high-quality medical professionals and trained care personnel and delivery of flexible care service, along with intensive capital flows for land, construction and operating costs.

Social implications

Additional senior housing policy support should be established to promote the CCRC supply to address the ageing needs, particularly granting lands for CCRC developments at Tiers 1 and 2 major cities where the land cost is high.

Originality/value

This research’s practical and policy measures can be applied to enable and promote CCRC developments in Shanghai, thus benefitting both housing investors and the government. The findings also form a baseline for CCRC developments in other major cities.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

P.W. Buys

In recent times there have been major developments in the areas of digitising business information, which can impact the financial reporting supply chain. Such…

Abstract

In recent times there have been major developments in the areas of digitising business information, which can impact the financial reporting supply chain. Such developments include the eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) technology. The South African regulator of financial services and a major South African retirement fund administrator were recently the first South African organisations to embark on an XBRL proof of concept initiative as part of an attempt to enhance their financial reporting supply chain, from initial data recording, to the submission of the reports, to the analysis of the data. This paper provides highlights of this initiative against the background of current XBRL developments, the financial reporting supply chain and the digitising efforts of such supply chains.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged…

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1287

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties, and level of income influence mature aged workers' preferences to enter different retirement employment options within the contingent and the flexible work arrangements (FWA) types of bridge employment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study was collected in 2008 using a questionnaire with 31 items. A total of 144 mature aged workers from multiple firms, aged 50 years and over, working full‐time, in the construction industry participated in the study. The collected data was analysed using correlation and regression analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that the study variables have positive and negative influences on pre‐retirees' preference for the retirement employment options within the contingent and the FWA bridge employment. It was also found that while income failed to moderate, social retirement anxieties did significantly moderate the relationship between perceived financial preparedness and the different employment options within the contingent bridge employment.

Practical implications

This study clearly provides practitioners and career counsellors a new insight that the work and non‐work predictors for the retirement employment options within each of the contingent and the FWA bridge employments vary between factors of perceived financial preparedness, social retirement anxieties and level of income.

Originality/value

In contradiction to the existing literature that “comfortable” social retirement adjustment as a determinant for bridge employment, this study's findings revealed that if pre‐retirees perceive that they are not adequately financially prepared for retirement, they would opt for bridge employment irrespective of levels of social retirement anxieties.

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Le Ma and Richard Reed

As the “baby boomer” generation continues to enter their senior post-retirement years, the provision of affordable retirement housing has become increasingly important for…

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1116

Abstract

Purpose

As the “baby boomer” generation continues to enter their senior post-retirement years, the provision of affordable retirement housing has become increasingly important for the community, practitioners and policymakers. However, relatively little attention has to date been placed on identifying an effective market mechanism for the industry of the independent-living retirement villages to meet this increased and unprecedented demand. This study aims to develop an innovative and affordable retirement village development model which meets the needs of all stakeholders including seniors, retirement village residents, the retirement village industry and government.

Design/methodology/approach

The attributes of this study are as follows: structure of individual living units, retirement village characteristics, retirement village facilities and services and support mechanisms. The analysis was undertaken based on data relating to independent-living retirement villages in five Australian states. A hedonic pricing model was used where the price distributions relating to these four aspects were estimated.

Findings

The results confirmed the structures of the independent living units and the retirement village characteristics were closely related to pricing, followed by services and supports with a lesser relationship, although the facilities were not significantly related to pricing.

Research limitations/implications

This research is not able to address the entire retirement village market in Australia because the available market data are limited.

Practical implications

This research uses an innovative supply-side approach to assess retirement village attributes and values, which provides stakeholders with up-to-date market information to assist in guiding the performance of the retirement village industry.

Social implications

The market evaluations imply that seniors are reluctant to pay for village attributes that are not regarded as highly sought-after. A cost-effective strategy of new retirement village developments and upgrades can be further induced, which in turn can enhance the market efficiency and affordability of the retirement villages.

Originality/value

This pricing model for retirement village units extends previous studies into retirement villages and presents stakeholders with an innovative and reliable market-oriented model.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Krista Lewellyn

The purpose of this paper is to draw from regulatory focus theory, to examine the effects of the “gain/no gain” nature of stock options and retirement pay on the decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw from regulatory focus theory, to examine the effects of the “gain/no gain” nature of stock options and retirement pay on the decision to engage in cross-border acquisitions. The moderating effects of managerial discretion arising from the external industry context and internal organizational leadership structure are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ random effects negative binomial regression analysis with a longitudinal (2006–2016) data set of US public companies operating in four industries with differing levels of industry discretion: the oil and gas, paper and packaging, aerospace and defense, and telecommunications.

Findings

The findings indicate that both CEO in-the-money stock options and retirement pay are positively related to cross-border acquisition activity. The results also demonstrate that managerial discretion, arising from the firm’s external industry context, accentuates the positive relationship between both the value of CEO in-the-money stock options and retirement pay with cross-border acquisition activity.

Practical implications

The findings provide implication for practice as understanding how retirement pay and stock options, both of which make up a substantial portion of overall CEO pay in the USA, motivate cross-border acquisition activity, may improve decisions by executives. The evidence also provides guidance to boards of directors who are charged with the responsibility of creating CEO compensation contracts.

Originality/value

The paper fills important gaps in the existing research on the influence of compensation elements on firm outcomes, by offering a novel explanation for how in-the-money stock options and retirement pay affect CEOs’ motivations to engage in cross-border acquisitions.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Frank Ato Ato Ghansah, Ewald Kuoribo and David John Edwards

Efficient decision-making must be reinvigorated to make a good decision towards retirement by construction workers. In developing countries such as Ghana, researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

Efficient decision-making must be reinvigorated to make a good decision towards retirement by construction workers. In developing countries such as Ghana, researchers conducted investigations into the effects of investing in retirement decision-making and planning, but none has considered to examine and identify the factors/determinants influencing efficient decision-making by construction workers towards retirement. This study aims to examine and identify the determinants/factors that affect the retirement decision-making of construction workers in developing countries such as Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used primary data collected from workers of four construction companies in Ghana. The sampling technique adopted for the study was a purposive sample approach, with a survey questionnaire as a collection instrument. Means score was adopted to reveal the major determinant/factor prioritized by the respondents while binary logistic regression was used to examine and identify the effect of the retirement determinants on the retirement decision of construction workers.

Findings

The findings established the main significant determinants impacting retirement decision, namely, “financial condition,” “homeownership,” “age” and “family issues.” Among the determinants, “financial condition” was revealed as the major determinant of retirement decision-making in the construction industry of developing countries, which is an economic condition by which the workers can easily secure credit.

Practical implications

Practically, the outcome of this study serves as a base for policymakers and practitioners in making decisions concerning the retirement of workers, especially construction workers. This study also serves to provide lesson for other classifications of workers aside from the construction workers in Ghana and other developing countries.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge by filling in the lacuna in research by examining and identifying the determinants/factors that impact the efficient decision-making by construction workers in developing countries towards retirement.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Christian Kuiate and Thomas R. Noland

This paper aims to investigate whether firms strategically use retirement plans to retain employees with core competencies and whether offering these retirement plans…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether firms strategically use retirement plans to retain employees with core competencies and whether offering these retirement plans provides competitive advantages that lead to greater profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set consists of annual financial data reported to the US Department of Transportation by long haul truckload carriers. The paper uses linear regression analysis to test the hypotheses. Descriptive statistics, univariate comparisons and robustness tests are also reported.

Findings

The findings support the assertion that offering a retirement plan is positively related to the attraction and retention of skilled workers and that firms that offer retirement plans are more profitable.

Research limitations/implications

Data limitations preclude proving a definitive causal relationship. With the increasing availability of rich and timely data sets at both the firm and employee levels, future research may enhance the understanding of the role that pensions play in both labor and firm productivity.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that retirement plans may serve as a strategic tool in highly competitive industries characterized by high labor turnover. This study shows that by analyzing the degree of cost stickiness in income statement line-items, it is possible to bypass the need for more granular analyses to uncover meaningful economic relationships. Finally, this study contributes to the literature examining the implications of operating decisions for financial performance (a balanced scorecard perspective), and it shows that offering pension benefits is related to stronger financial performance.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Matt Flynn

This chapter discusses how trade union structuring and organisation in the West and Asia shapes how they respond to government and employer pressures to extend working…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how trade union structuring and organisation in the West and Asia shapes how they respond to government and employer pressures to extend working life. Class-based solidarity building in the West should lead to unions protecting employment and pension rights by mobilising members to defend the ‘right to retire’ while campaigning for protections of all older workers. Enterprise unionism in Asia, on the other hand, should mean that unions use their close relationships with government and employers to protect the job security of core employees and mobilise company-based solidarity. Drawing on the survey data, expectations and awareness of union members and non-members are compared in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong. It is shown that British union members have a greater understanding of their employment rights and retirement savings while in Hong Kong union membership correlates with better understanding of company HRM policies.

Details

Managing the Ageing Workforce in the East and the West
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-639-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 10000