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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sanghee Kim

– The purpose of this paper is to determine employee retention rates and describe factors affecting employee retention among older workers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine employee retention rates and describe factors affecting employee retention among older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts a secondary data analysis using data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing (KLoSA) of Korea Employment Information Service. The authors use data on 1,264 newly employed older workers from the 2010 KLoSA and determine their employment retention status based on data from the 2012 KLoSA.

Findings

The employee turnover rate of older workers was 37.1 per cent between 2010 and 2012, indicating that one-third of older workers stopped work within the two years under study. The factors affecting the employment retention of older workers were education level, job position, job type, work-related stress, health status, and activity limitation due to health status.

Research limitations/implications

This study concentrated on the South Korea context. Given the particular circumstances facing South Korea (as outlined in the study) it is unlikely that the findings would provide a base for informing employment retention strategies for older workers in other societies.

Practical implications

The South Korean government could use this study’s findings in formulating a policy for improving welfare in workplaces to increase the employment retention rate among older workers. Employers employing or intending to hire older workers would have a better understanding about factors affecting their retention. To reduce their work-related stress, older workers require a safe and healthy work environment that considers their health status.

Originality/value

This study is the first one to look at the factors affecting the retention of older workers in South Korea.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Bridget Rice

The purpose of this paper is to present the importance of i-deals, or idiosyncratic deals, especially for older workers in organizations.

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430

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the importance of i-deals, or idiosyncratic deals, especially for older workers in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper briefly reviews recent literature relating to the important benefits older workers bring to organizations and the elements of their work that older workers value.

Findings

Keeping older workers in the organization can have important benefits. Enhanced flexibility and autonomy is especially valued by older workers.

Research limitations/implications

As a brief review, this paper summarizes other literature.

Practical implications

I-deals, or flexible work deals, must respond to the specific needs and desires of older workers. Older workers have increasingly diverse wants and needs, and it is important that they be heard in this regard.

Social implications

As society ages, managing these challenges will become both more important and challenging.

Originality/value

This paper will be widely read and may drive practical change in organizations.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Hila Axelrad, Alexandra Kalev and Noah Lewin-Epstein

Higher pensionable age in many countries that are part of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and a shrinking pension income force older people…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher pensionable age in many countries that are part of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and a shrinking pension income force older people to postpone their retirement. Yet, age-based discrimination in employers' decisions is a significant barrier to their employment. Hence, this paper aims to explore employers' attitudes regarding the employment of workers aged 60–70, striving for a better understanding of age discrimination.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 30 managers, experts and employees in retirement age in Israel.

Findings

Findings reveal a spectrum of employers' attitudes toward the employment of older workers. The authors' analytical contribution is a conceptual typology based on employers' perceived ability to employ older workers and their stated attitudes toward the employment of older workers.

Social implications

The insights that emerge from this research are fundamental for organizational actors' ability to expand the productive, unbiased employment of older workers.

Originality/value

By understanding employers' preferences and perspectives and the implications on employers' ability and/or willingness to employ older workers, this research will help policymakers formulate and implement policy innovations that address these biases.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Bridget Rice, Nigel Martin, Peter Fieger and Taiba Hussain

Demographic changes involving a worldwide ageing population and later retirements produce a gradual ageing of the workforce and major concerns about how ageing may…

Abstract

Purpose

Demographic changes involving a worldwide ageing population and later retirements produce a gradual ageing of the workforce and major concerns about how ageing may influence the workplace. This paper aims to provide evidence relating to older workers in healthcare settings in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a secondary quantitative dataset, the authors sub-sampled a group of workers in the healthcare sector. We used linear regression arrangement with hypotheses focused on the assessment of the significance of interaction or moderation effects relating to job characteristics and age on employee satisfaction.

Findings

The authors note that older workers' job satisfaction is negatively influenced by poor perceptions of job security and autonomy in how their work is carried out. Ensuring that older workers stay in the healthcare workforce is imperative as the work force ages. This paper shows that managing their job security and offering them work autonomy enhance their job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a secondary and cross-sectional dataset has some limitations relating to endogeneity, although these have been managed and assessed. The paper is based on a representative sample of Australian workers, and is thus generalisable within the Australian context, and will be informative elsewhere.

Practical implications

The focus on elements of flexibility for older workers (enhanced autonomy) and clearer job security elements is of practical relevance in the management of older workers.

Social implications

As the overall population ages, supporting older workers in their careers will be of increasing importance. In sectors with a disproportionate share of older workers, like health care, this imperative will come sooner, and the benefits of getting arrangements right be will higher.

Originality/value

No other paper has explored these specific relationships empirically that the authors are aware of. This work is original in terms of its assessment of questions of what second-order effects exist in predicting employee satisfaction among older workers.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Todd J Maurer, Kimberly A Wrenn and Elizabeth M Weiss

A model of stereotypical beliefs that older workers have difficulty learning and developing and are not motivated to learn is presented. Three categories of antecedents of…

Abstract

A model of stereotypical beliefs that older workers have difficulty learning and developing and are not motivated to learn is presented. Three categories of antecedents of the stereotypical beliefs are addressed: (1) experience with stereotype-consistent behaviors and promulgation of the stereotype by others; (2) perceived learning and development inhibitors internal to the older worker; and (3) perceived learning and development inhibitors external to the older worker. Potential consequences of the stereotypical beliefs for older workers and employing organizations are also explored. Individuating information and knowledge of within-older-group differences are posited to attenuate the influence of group-based stereotypes. Processes and tactics within organizations that should increase this information and knowledge are presented. The proposed model provides a framework to help guide future research on this topic and also some suggestions for managing a work place where these beliefs may exist.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

John Goodwin and Henrietta O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the key themes in the area of the impact of demographic change on young workers and older workers in relation to education…

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2430

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the key themes in the area of the impact of demographic change on young workers and older workers in relation to education, skills and employment, as discussed in the papers included in this section. The authors have also drawn upon data from their project “From Young Workers to Older Workers” as a context for the papers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws out the main themes from the papers contained within this section and presents original data from interviews with 97 older workers who were interviewed at two points in time – labour market entry and labour market exit.

Findings

The selection of papers in this section is outlined, as well as offering some findings from the authors’ research on older workers.

Originality/value

The papers in this section, including this paper, offer an overview of some of the key debates in relation to the impact of demographic change on both young workers and older workers.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2019

Ting Zhang

Facing the aging workforce but older workers’ vulnerability in the labor market, this chapter empirically explores factors and policy implications to enhance older workers

Abstract

Facing the aging workforce but older workers’ vulnerability in the labor market, this chapter empirically explores factors and policy implications to enhance older workers’ entered employment rates (EER) after exiting the national workforce program. After reviewing older workers’ attributes and the unique methods to train them, the chapter examines demographic, socioeconomic, and program attributions to older workers’ EER, controlling for cyclical changes in the labor market. The chapter relies on three sets of models including logistic regression, multi-level mixed-effect regression, and multilevel mixed effect logistic regression models, as well as longitudinal Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data and Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment data. Older dislocated workers and older adults are examined separately. Some Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act training and related service combinations are identified to contribute to older adults and older dislocated workers’ EER and to inform strategic decision-making about future allocations of funds and policy efforts to serve older workers.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-192-6

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

P. Matthijs Bal and Paul G. W. Jansen

As demographic changes impact the workplace, governments, organizations, and workers are looking for ways to sustain optimal working lives at higher ages. Workplace…

Abstract

As demographic changes impact the workplace, governments, organizations, and workers are looking for ways to sustain optimal working lives at higher ages. Workplace flexibility has been introduced as a potential way workers can have more satisfying working lives until their retirement ages. This chapter presents a critical review of the literature on workplace flexibility across the lifespan. It discusses how flexibility has been conceptualized across different disciplines, and postulates a definition that captures the joint roles of employer and employee in negotiating workplace flexibility that contributes to both employee and organization benefits. Moreover, it reviews how flexibility has been theorized and investigated in relation to older workers. The chapter ends with a future research agenda for advancing understanding of how workplace flexibility may enhance working experiences of older workers, and in particular focuses on the critical investigation of uses of flexibility in relation to older workers.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-263-7

Keywords

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