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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Ruth Marciniak

Through the examination of retail space, by the end of this chapter you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:The use of space within retailing.Lefebrve’s…

Abstract

Through the examination of retail space, by the end of this chapter you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

The use of space within retailing.

Lefebrve’s spatial triad: perceived, conceived and lived within a retail context.

Disruption innovation and the use of retail space.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim and Chung Peow Chua

The unconventional concept of leasing temporary retail space has taken the retailing world by storm in the past decade. In addition to permanent retail space (in‐line…

Abstract

Purpose

The unconventional concept of leasing temporary retail space has taken the retailing world by storm in the past decade. In addition to permanent retail space (in‐line stores), many shopping centre management staff have leased temporary retail space as a form of maximizing the net lettable area of the shopping malls, thus hoping to reap better returns for the real estate investors. Using Singapore as the study area, this paper aims to investigate shoppers' perceptions of in‐line stores (permanent retail space) and comparing them to their perceptions of retail carts (temporary retail space) in shopping centres.

Design/methodology/approach

To examine shoppers' perceptions of in‐line stores and retail carts, the paper adopts a mixed method sequential design by way of qualitative/quantitative sequence.

Findings

In terms of image structures, in‐line stores and retail carts share three common image dimensions, namely, “atmosphere”, “variety of product” and “service quality”. In‐line stores recorded an additional factor, “value”. However, the shoppers displayed better perception ratings towards all retail space attributes and factors of in‐line stores relative to that of the retail carts. In addition, the data also revealed that age of the shoppers has a direct influence on shoppers' perceptions of retail carts and in‐line stores.

Originality/value

The findings not only add to the current retail literature, but will also aid retail industry players in improving their marketing and overall tenant‐mix structures for more successful leasing strategies. This will maximize the usage of retail real estate space that may in turn result in higher returns for real estate investors.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Salih Ceylan

The existence of retail spaces lies far back in history. However, retail design as an academic field of work is relatively recent and available for development. The common…

Abstract

Purpose

The existence of retail spaces lies far back in history. However, retail design as an academic field of work is relatively recent and available for development. The common points and differences between commercial spaces and retail spaces, as well as the relationship between private and public spaces, require academic attention from a retail perspective. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the academic knowledge on retail design by interpreting retail spaces according to their relationship with their surroundings and their way of defining borders.

Design/methodology/approach

The focal point of the paper lies on a case study based on built examples of retail spaces in Turkey. An actual perspective, along with the historical background of retail design, provides the theoretical framework of the study, as the term “border” is being interpreted according to encountered restrictions and intentions throughout the retail design process.

Findings

The case study conducted in the scope of this paper has shown that borders are an important component in retail design and they are affected by various factors like the limitations of the surroundings and atmospheric tools such as colours, lighting, sound or scent.

Originality/value

Although there are existing studies on retail design from various perspectives, the interpretation of retail spaces in relationship with their borders is missing in academic literature. This paper provides a definition of borders in retail design including the elements that describe them and the knowledge of borders according to different corporate tendencies.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Kim Hin David Ho and Faishal bin Ibrahim Muhammad

From the perspective of the macro‐economy and real estate sector interaction, this paper aims to examine the maturing prime retail real estate sector versus the developing…

Abstract

Purpose

From the perspective of the macro‐economy and real estate sector interaction, this paper aims to examine the maturing prime retail real estate sector versus the developing suburban retail real estate sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a highly specific dynamic computable general equilibrium model under system dynamics programming to structure the resulting system complexity within the context of Singapore.

Findings

Ex post and ex ante model estimations find that the suburban retail real estate sector is on the whole more susceptible to gross domestic product (GDP) growth policy that affects both GDP expansion and retail rents in actual and expectation terms as well as returns.

Research limitations/implications

The DCGE model ex ante estimations for the planned scenarios, under low or high GDP growth for the prime and suburban retail real estate sectors, enhances understanding of structural factors and dynamic interaction in the maturation phase of the prime retail real estate sector in Singapore.

Practical implications

In comparison, Singapore's suburban retail real estate sector is found to be in a developing phase.

Originality/value

There is limited local research on the underlying relationship between the economy and the retail real estate sector, although Singapore's retail sector and retail real estate sector form an integral part of sustainable economic expansion.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Christian Fuentes and Johan Hagberg

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the on‐going cultural turn in retail marketing by offering an overview of the interdisciplinary field of socio‐cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the on‐going cultural turn in retail marketing by offering an overview of the interdisciplinary field of socio‐cultural retailing and discussing how this body of work can contribute conceptually, methodologically and substantively to the field of retail marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a literature review of socio‐cultural retail studies in marketing, cultural geography, sociology, and anthropology. The literature is analysed in relation to the substantive, conceptual and methodological domains of retail marketing.

Findings

Drawing on the literature review, the authors argue that socio‐cultural retail studies can contribute to the field of retail marketing substantively, conceptually and methodologically, thus broadening its current scope and domains.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of an interdisciplinary field and identifies how it can contribute to the field of retail marketing. It is valuable for retailing researchers interested in socio‐cultural approaches to the study of contemporary retailing.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Adejimi Alli Adebayo, Paul Greenhalgh and Kevin Muldoon-Smith

The retail property market is constantly adopting to the continuous demand of retailers and their consumers. This paper aims to investigate retail property market dynamics…

Abstract

Purpose

The retail property market is constantly adopting to the continuous demand of retailers and their consumers. This paper aims to investigate retail property market dynamics through spatial accessibility measures of the City of York street network. It explores how spatial accessibility metrics (SAM) explain retail market dynamics (RMD) through changes in the city’s retail rental values and stock.

Design/methodology/approach

Valuation office agency (VOA) data sets (aspatial) and ordnance survey map (spatial) data form the empirical foundation for this investigation. Changes in rental value and retail stock between 2010 and 2017 VOA data sets represent the RMD variables. While, the configured street network measures of Space Syntax, namely, global integration, local integration, global choice and normalised angular choice form the SAM variables. The relationship between these variables is analysed through geo-visualisation and statistical testing using GIS and SPSS tools.

Findings

The study reveals that there has been an overall negative changes of 15 and 22% in rental value and retail stock, respectively, even though some locations within the sampled city (York, North Yorkshire, England) indicated positive changes. The study further indicated that changes in retail rental value and stock have occurred within locations with good accessibility index. It also verifies that there are spatial and statistical relationship between variables and 22% of RMD variability was jointly accounted for by SAM.

Originality/value

This research is first to investigates changes in retail property market variables through spatial accessibility measures of space syntax. It contributes to the burgeoning research field of real estate and Space Syntax.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Corinne Yap

Singapore’s retail landscape has undergone much change since the 1960s as a result of its economic growth and social change. Fuelling the transformation is the Urban…

Abstract

Singapore’s retail landscape has undergone much change since the 1960s as a result of its economic growth and social change. Fuelling the transformation is the Urban Renewal Authority (URA) whose policies have resulted in modern one‐stop shopping centres. Today’s retail market is highly cosmopolitan, complex and sophisticated with nearly every international brand and retailer found there. However, the retail market has been tough in the last few years owing to problems such as an oversupply of retail space, high labour costs and a tight labour market. Describes strategies adopted by retailers and developers to combat the problems in the industry. Among the strategies adopted by retailers are niche marketing and regionalization. They have also forged strategic alliances with other larger retailers. Developers, on the other hand, have recognized the need to find the right tenant mix as opposed to just securing the highest rents. Less competitive shopping centres have also considered converting their retail space to more sought‐after office space. The government continues to steer Singapore’s urban development with its policies. The URA’s long‐range vision is presented in its concept plan. The broad policies of the concept plan have been translated into detailed development guide plans for specific areas.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Muhammad Najib Razali, Rohana Abdul Rahman, Yasmin Mohd Adnan and Azlina Mohd. Yassin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of using information and communication technology (ICT) on retail property in Malaysia. It also examines what listed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of using information and communication technology (ICT) on retail property in Malaysia. It also examines what listed property companies perceive in terms of the implications of using ICT in the retail property sector in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from sample surveys completed by 79 property companies listed on the Bursa Malaysia (formerly known as the Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange). An ICT retail impact matrix was then developed to assess the significance of ICT on retail property in Malaysia.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that ICT would have only a minor impact on retail property in Malaysia and that there would still be a need for the traditional means of conducting a retail property business. It also found that the listed property companies were ready to implement ICT applications and that the demand for retail property would still increase in Malaysia in the future.

Research limitations/implications

Only 66 percent of listed property companies in Malaysia (the respondents) participated in the study.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to look at the impact ICT has on retail property in Malaysia. For this purpose, an ICT retail impact matrix was developed to assess this impact. As such, this study will be used as a benchmark for future ICT studies relating to retail property and the real estate sector in Malaysia.

Details

Property Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Tony Kent

This paper sets out to explore the concept of creativity in the context of the retail store environment and the function of design in shaping this environment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore the concept of creativity in the context of the retail store environment and the function of design in shaping this environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a cross‐disciplinary approach to review theoretical approaches to creativity, and their relevance to the retail industry. It subsequently assesses types of retail spaces, and then moves on to compare the concept of retail design with product design and its implications for creativity and retailers.

Findings

It demonstrates the complexity of creativity as a concept, and the opportunities to create retail spaces through design‐led approaches. It defines retail design and its engagement with stakeholders within and outside the organisation and its impact on organisational creativity.

Research limitations/implications

As a review paper it covers a number of perspectives on creativity, design and store environments. However, these are not exhaustive, and invite further discussion and scoping for future research.

Practical implications

The paper outlines ways to understand creativity in retailing, and provides guidance on how retailers can organize their organizations to engage with design projects.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely examines concepts of creativity and proposes how they might be applied to retailing. It demonstrates how creativity pervades the industry, in terms of design and the use of designed spaces. It proposes new areas for research relating to the definition of creativity in the retail industry, and the role of creativity and retailing in cultural and social contexts.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Cuneyt Eroglu, Brent D. Williams and Matthew A. Waller

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct and interaction effects of shelf space, case pack quantity, and consumer demand on shelf stockouts, i.e. stockouts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct and interaction effects of shelf space, case pack quantity, and consumer demand on shelf stockouts, i.e. stockouts at the shelf level when inventory is available in the backroom of a retail store.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses discrete‐event simulation based on data collected from the ready‐to‐eat breakfast cereal category with multiple stockkeeping units (SKUs) to model a retail supply chain consisting of a supplier, a retailer, and consumers.

Findings

The results indicate that shelf space and case pack quantity have direct effects on shelf stockouts. Furthermore, evidence is found for interactions among shelf space, case pack quantity and consumer demand. Though many retailers adopt simple heuristics for shelf space allocation, such as a multiple of case pack quantity, this study suggests that such heuristics tend to over‐ or underestimate shelf space requirements when consumer demand is ignored.

Originality/value

This study suggests that managers should allocate shelf space for SKUs on the basis of not only case pack quantity but also consumer demand.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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