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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2012

Fiona Moore

Purpose – To consider why, although it does maintain a distinct presence, ethnography still remains very much on the fringes of international business (IB) studies.…

Abstract

Purpose – To consider why, although it does maintain a distinct presence, ethnography still remains very much on the fringes of international business (IB) studies.

Methodology/Approach – This chapter involves a literature review comparing ethnography in IB studies with its position in the related disciplines of industrial relations and Japanese studies, in both of which the ethnography of business is much more prominent, and both of which have close relationships with mainstream anthropology.

Findings – The author argues that a crucial factor in achieving greater prominence for ethnography in IB studies is in fact to encourage more studies of international organisations in mainstream anthropology.

Research limitations/Implications – The review of literature is necessarily brief and should be expanded to include more disciplines to test its conclusions; however, developments in the anthropology of China and India may add further data.

Practical implications – There are a number of ways in which the three disciplines can learn from, and contribute to, each other through the medium of ethnography, which are discussed.

Originality/Value – The value of the chapter is in considering ways in which IB studies and industrial relations can learn from each other and can make more effective use of ethnography, and how mainstream anthropology can benefit from incorporating perspectives from business-focused disciplines.

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West Meets East: Building Theoretical Bridges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-028-4

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Livia Holden

This chapter explores expert witnessing in anthropology and the raison d’être of cultural expertise as an integrated socio-legal concept that accounts for the contribution…

Abstract

This chapter explores expert witnessing in anthropology and the raison d’être of cultural expertise as an integrated socio-legal concept that accounts for the contribution of social sciences to the resolution of disputes and the protection of human rights. The first section of this chapter provides a short historical outline of the occurrence and reception of anthropological expertise as expert witnessing. The second section surveys the theoretical reflections on anthropologists’ engagement with law. The third section explores the potential for anthropological expertise as a broader socio-legal notion in the common law and civil law legal systems. The chapter concludes with the opportunity and raison d’être of cultural expertise grounded on a skeptical approach to culture. It suggests that expert witnessing has been viewed mainly from a technical perspective of applied social sciences, which was necessary to set the legal framework of cultural experts’ engagement with law, but had the consequence of entrenching the impossibility of a comprehensive study of anthropological expert witnessing. While this chapter adopts a skeptical approach to culture, it also argues the advantages of an interdisciplinary approach that leads to an integrated definition of cultural expertise.

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2017

Brian McKenna

This chapter will examine ideological debates currently taking place in academics. Anthropologists – and all academic workers – are at a crossroads. They must determine…

Abstract

This chapter will examine ideological debates currently taking place in academics. Anthropologists – and all academic workers – are at a crossroads. They must determine what it means to “green the academy” in an era of permanent war, “green capitalism,” and the neoliberal university (Sullivan, 2010). As Victor Wallis makes clear, “no serious observer now denies the severity of the environmental crisis, but it is still not widely recognized as a capitalist crisis, that is, as a crisis arising from and perpetuated by the rule of capital, and hence incapable of resolution within the capitalist framework.”

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Environmental Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-377-9

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Justin A. Elardo

Purpose – Inspired by “old” institutional arguments, this chapter presents the ideas of both the “old” and “new” institutional perspective as their arguments appear in the…

Abstract

Purpose – Inspired by “old” institutional arguments, this chapter presents the ideas of both the “old” and “new” institutional perspective as their arguments appear in the economic anthropology literature following the substantivist–formalist debate of the 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach – During the 1960s the substantivist–formalist debate, otherwise known as the “Great Debate,” thrust institutional thought to the forefront of economic anthropology. By the close of the 1960s, the substantivist–formalist debate passed unresolved. Institutional economic anthropology reached a crossroad – it could continue the legacy of the substantivism as represented by “old” institutionalism or follow the path of “new” institutional economics. Against the long shadow of the “Great Debate,” this chapter identifies key epistemological ideas that are present within the recent history of the institutional economic anthropology literature.

Findings – On the basis of epistemological arguments, the chapter suggests that if the substantivist–formalist debate, often times referred to as the “Great Debate,” is ever to achieve closure, then practitioners of institutional economic anthropology would benefit by moving beyond “new” institutional thought.

Originality/value – This chapter provides a unique evaluation of the institutional perspective within the history of economic anthropology. Residing within this history are clear and poignant distinctions between the “old” and “new” institutional perspectives. As a result, this chapter seeks to bring to social scientists interested in institutional economists, important insights from economic anthropology that may have otherwise gone unnoticed.

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Political Economy, Neoliberalism, and the Prehistoric Economies of Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-059-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

Marilyn L. Haas

If the bibliographic apparatus is the measure of a discipline's maturity, anthropology has come of age. Anthropology now has at least one entry in nearly all of the…

Abstract

If the bibliographic apparatus is the measure of a discipline's maturity, anthropology has come of age. Anthropology now has at least one entry in nearly all of the standard library reference formats — abstracts, annuals, atlases, dictionary‐encyclopedia, directories (to serials, biographical information, and academic departments), guides to the field, handbooks, indexes, library catalogs, and literature reviews. Some titles do not pigeon‐hole neatly into these categories, and some are beginning efforts, but it is important to know that they do at least exist.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Ellen Sutton and Lori Foulke

Librarians increasingly encounter decisions related to the use and/or purchase of an expanding body of bibliographic databases. This article examines the coverage of…

Abstract

Librarians increasingly encounter decisions related to the use and/or purchase of an expanding body of bibliographic databases. This article examines the coverage of anthropology literatures in major academic indexes widely available in electronic format. Eight databases were selected for comparison, including three subject‐specific indexes, two multidisciplinary social sciences indexes, and three general academic indexes. Indexes were compared for their coverage of a core list of 135 anthropology journals as well as journals relevant to anthropology in other social science disciplines. In addition to journal coverage, several index characteristics were also compared: years of coverage; timeliness; extent of indexing; record structure; search software; and availability of controlled vocabulary, abstracts and full text. It is concluded that each database has relative merits and weaknesses and that these multiple factors must be considered within the context of local conditions in order to determine which database products are appropriate for meeting local information needs.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Fred J. Hay

Anthropology was a late‐comer to the Caribbean and only after World War II did the study of Caribbean culture and societies become less exceptional. Early in this century…

Abstract

Anthropology was a late‐comer to the Caribbean and only after World War II did the study of Caribbean culture and societies become less exceptional. Early in this century when anthropology was first making itself over as an ethnographic science, anthropologists concentrated on tribal peoples. For most of the post‐Columbian era, the Caribbean region, with a few minor exceptions, was without indigenous tribal societies. Even after anthropology turned its attention to the study of peasantries, Caribbean peasantries were ignored in favor of more stable and tradition‐oriented peasant societies in other parts of Latin America. When anthropologists began to study Caribbean peoples in a more serious and systematic fashion, they found that they had to develop new concepts to explain the variation, flexibility, and heterogeneity that characterized regional culture. These concepts have had a significant impact on social and cultural theory and on the broader contemporary dialogue about cultural diversity and multiculturalism.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Deborah Kane

The study of psychological anthropology represents the interworkings of the theories, concepts, empirical findings, and methodologies of psychology and anthropology. This…

Abstract

The study of psychological anthropology represents the interworkings of the theories, concepts, empirical findings, and methodologies of psychology and anthropology. This discussion of resources is written from the point of view of an anthropologist, not a psychologist. The psychologists have a related, though not identical, discipline called cross‐cultural psychology. As no scholar nor group of scholars can afford to live in a void, we find the works of members of both disciplines appearing in the same publications. This fact will be evident in the description of resources to follow.

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Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Fred Luthans, Ivana Milosevic, Beth A. Bechky, Edgar H. Schein, Susan Wright, John Van Maanen and Davydd J. Greenwood

This collection of commentaries on the reprinted 1987 article by Nancy C. Morey and Fred Luthans, “Anthropology: the forgotten behavioral science in management history”…

Abstract

Purpose

This collection of commentaries on the reprinted 1987 article by Nancy C. Morey and Fred Luthans, “Anthropology: the forgotten behavioral science in management history”, aims to reflect on the treatment of the history of anthropological work in organizational studies presented in the original article.

Design/methodology/approach

The essays are invited and peer‐reviewed contributions from scholars in organizational studies and anthropology.

Findings

The scholars invited to comment on the original article have seen its value, and their contributions ground its content in contemporary issues and debates.

Originality/value

The original article was deemed “original” for its time (1987), anticipating as it did considerable reclamation of ethnographic methods in organizational studies in the decades that followed it. It was also deemed of value for our times and, in particular, for readers of this journal, as an historical document, but also as one view of the unsung role of anthropology in management and organizational studies.

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Larry Stephen Perry

Anthropology, and archaeology, a subdivision of anthropology, traditionally defined as the study of man and his cultures, has greatly expanded its scope of interest in…

Abstract

Anthropology, and archaeology, a subdivision of anthropology, traditionally defined as the study of man and his cultures, has greatly expanded its scope of interest in recent years. These interests are now much more contemporary and therefore less arcane to the average layman.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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